Permalink
cc8c6a2 Feb 3, 2015
@dcommander @CendioOssman @astrand @bphinz
524 lines (369 sloc) 17.4 KB
*******************************************************************************
** Building TigerVNC
*******************************************************************************
================================
Build Requirements (All Systems)
================================
-- CMake (http://www.cmake.org) v2.8 or later
-- zlib
-- FLTK 1.3.3 or later
-- If building TLS support:
* GnuTLS 3.x
* See "Building TLS Support" below.
-- If building native language support (NLS):
* Gnu gettext 0.14.4 or later
* See "Building Native Language Support" below.
-- libjpeg-turbo
* "Normal" libjpegv6 is also supported, although it is not
recommended as it is much slower.
=========================
Build Requirements (Unix)
=========================
-- Non-Mac platforms:
* X11 development kit
-- If building Xvnc/libvnc.so:
* Xorg server source code, 1.7 or never
* All build requirements Xorg imposes (see its documentation)
============================
Build Requirements (Windows)
============================
-- MinGW or MinGW-w64
-- Inno Setup (needed to build the TigerVNC installer)
Inno Setup can be downloaded from http://www.jrsoftware.org/isinfo.php.
You also need the Inno Setup Preprocessor, which is available in the
Inno Setup QuickStart Pack.
Add the directory containing iscc.exe (for instance,
C:\Program Files\Inno Setup 5) to the system or user PATH environment
variable prior to building TigerVNC.
=========================
Build Requirements (Java)
=========================
-- Sun/Oracle JDK v5 or later or OpenJDK
-- See "Building Java Support" below.
==================
Out-of-Tree Builds
==================
Binary objects, libraries, and executables are generated in the same directory
from which cmake was executed (the "binary directory"), and this directory need
not necessarily be the same as the TigerVNC source directory. You can create
multiple independent binary directories, in which different versions of
TigerVNC can be built from the same source tree using different compilers or
settings. In the sections below, {build_directory} refers to the binary
directory, whereas {source_directory} refers to the TigerVNC source directory.
For in-tree builds, these directories are the same.
=================
Building TigerVNC
=================
Building the TigerVNC Viewer on Unix/Mac Systems
------------------------------------------------
The following procedure will build the TigerVNC Viewer on Linux and Unix
systems. On 64-bit systems, this will build a 64-bit version of TigerVNC. See
"Build Recipes" for specific build instructions for building a 32-bit version
of TigerVNC on 64-bit systems.
cd {build_directory}
cmake -G "Unix Makefiles" [additional CMake flags] {source_directory}
make
Building the TigerVNC Server on Modern Unix/Linux Systems
---------------------------------------------------------
Building the TigerVNC Server (Xvnc) is a bit trickier. On newer systems
containing Xorg 7.4 or later (such as Fedora), Xvnc is typically built to use
the X11 shared libraries provided with the system. The procedure for this is
system-specific, since it requires specifying such things as font directories,
but the general outline is as follows (this procedure assumes that the viewer
has already been built, per above.)
> cd {build_directory}
If performing an out-of-tree build:
> mkdir unix
> cp -R {source_directory}/unix/xserver unix/
> cp -R {xorg_source}/* unix/xserver/
(NOTE: {xorg_source} is the directory containing the Xorg source for the
machine on which you are building TigerVNC. The most recent versions of
Red Hat/CentOS/Fedora, for instance, provide an RPM called
"xorg-x11-server-source", which installs the Xorg source under
/usr/share/xorg-x11-server-source.)
> cd unix/xserver/
> patch -p1 < {source_directory}/unix/xserver{version}.patch
(where {version} matches the X server version you are building, such as
"17" for version 1.7.x.)
> autoreconf -fiv
> ./configure --with-pic --without-dtrace --disable-static --disable-dri \
--disable-xinerama --disable-xvfb --disable-xnest --disable-xorg \
--disable-dmx --disable-xwin --disable-xephyr --disable-kdrive \
--disable-config-dbus --disable-config-hal --disable-config-udev \
--disable-dri2 --enable-install-libxf86config --enable-glx \
--with-default-font-path="catalogue:/etc/X11/fontpath.d,built-ins" \
--with-fontdir=/usr/share/X11/fonts \
--with-xkb-path=/usr/share/X11/xkb \
--with-xkb-output=/var/lib/xkb \
--with-xkb-bin-directory=/usr/bin \
--with-serverconfig-path=/usr/lib[64]/xorg \
--with-dri-driver-path=/usr/lib[64]/dri \
{additional configure options}
(NOTE: This is merely an example that works with Red Hat Enterprise/CentOS
6 and recent Fedora releases. You should customize it for your particular
system. In particular, it will be necessary to customize the font, XKB,
and DRI directories.)
> make TIGERVNC_SRCDIR={source_directory}
Building the TigerVNC Server on Legacy Unix/Linux Systems
---------------------------------------------------------
Those using systems with older versions of Xorg must build a "legacy-friendly"
version of the TigerVNC Server. This is accomplished by downloading and
building the more recent Xorg modules in a local directory and then building
Xvnc such that it links against the local build of these libraries, not the X11
libraries installed on the system. The "build-xorg" script in the TigerVNC
source distribution (located under contrib/xorg/) automates this process.
The following procedure will build both the TigerVNC Viewer and a
"legacy-friendly" version of the TigerVNC Server:
cd {build_directory}
sh {source_directory}/contrib/xorg/build-xorg init
sh {source_directory}/contrib/xorg/build-xorg build [additional CMake flags]
build-xorg generates a version of Xvnc that has no external dependencies on the
X11 shared libraries or any other distribution-specific shared libraries. This
version of Xvnc should be transportable across multiple O/S distributions.
build-xorg should work on Red Hat Enterprise 4, its contemporaries, and later
systems. It probably will not work on older systems. It has not been tested
on non-Linux systems (yet).
build-xorg can also be used to rebuild just the TigerVNC Server and Viewer,
once the X11 modules and other dependencies have been built for the first time.
This is convenient for testing changes that just apply to the TigerVNC source
code. To accomplish this, run:
sh {source_directory}/contrib/xorg/build-xorg rebuild [additional make flags]
For instance,
sh {source_directory}/contrib/xorg/build-xorg rebuild clean
will clean both the Xvnc and vncviewer builds without destroying any of the
build configuration or module dependencies.
Building the Windows TigerVNC Viewer with MinGW
-----------------------------------------------
If building the Windows version of TigerVNC on a Windows build system, use
the following procedure.
cd {build_directory}
cmake -G "MSYS Makefiles" [additional CMake flags] {source_directory}
make
If cross-compiling on a Unix/Linux system, then see the "Build Recipes" section
below.
Debug Build
-----------
Add "-DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Debug" to the CMake command line.
Portable (semi-static) Build
----------------------------
TigerVNC can under favourble circumstances be built in a way that allows
the resulting binaries to run on any system without having to also install
all the dynamic libraries it depends on. Enable this mode by adding:
-DBUILD_STATIC=1
to the CMake command line.
Note that the method used to achieve this is very fragile and it may be
necessary to tweak cmake/StaticBuild.cmake to make things work on your
specific system.
=====================
Building Java Support
=====================
TigerVNC includes a Java version of the TigerVNC Viewer, which can be used on
any platform that has a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) installed. The Java
viewer works similarly to the native viewer, but with lower performance.
To build the Java TigerVNC Viewer, add
-DBUILD_JAVA=1
to the CMake or build-xorg command line. The build system will attempt to find
an installed Java Development Kit (JDK) and determine the appropriate paths for
the Java compiler (javac) and the JAR creation utility (jar). You can override
these paths by setting the Java_JAVAC_EXECUTABLE and Java_JAR_EXECUTABLE CMake
variables. You can also override the default flags that are passed to javac
by setting the JAVACFLAGS CMake variable. The build system will look for
keytool and jarsigner in the same directory as Java_JAR_EXECUTABLE. These
tools are needed to sign the JAR file, which is necessary to enable certain
functionality (such as clipboard transfers) when the Java viewer is used as an
applet.
If the Java viewer is built along with the Windows TigerVNC Server (WinVNC),
then the build system will embed the Java viewer into WinVNC4.exe so that it
will automatically be served up using WinVNC's built-in HTTP server.
Similarly, if the Java viewer is built along with the Unix TigerVNC Server
(Xvnc), then the build system will include the Java viewer in the server
tarball.
By default, a self-signed certificate will be generated and used to sign the
jar file. By specifying the following command line arguments to the CMake
command line, an alternate certificate may be used for signing.
-DJAVA_KEYSTORE=${keystore_location_or_url}
-DJAVA_KEYSTORE_TYPE=${keystore_type} (Default: "jks")
-DJAVA_KEY_ALIAS=${keytore_key_alias}
-DJAVA_STOREPASS=${keystore_password}
-DJAVA_KEYPASS=${keystore_entry_password}
-DJAVA_TSA_URL=${url_of_timestamping_authority}
The values of the JAVA_STOREPASS and JAVA_KEYPASS arguments may optionally be
read from file or environment variables by prefixing the value with ":env "
or ":file " (see the jarsigner documentation for more info):
export StorePass=tigervnc
export KeyPass=tigervnc
cmake \
...
-DJAVA_STOREPASS=":env StorePass"
-DJAVA_KEYPASS=":env KeyPass"
======================================
Building TLS Support
======================================
TLS requires GnuTLS, which is supplied with most Linux distributions and
with MinGW for Windows and can be built from source on OS X and other
Unix variants. However, GnuTLS versions > 2.12.x && < 3.3.x should be
avoided because of potential incompatibilities during initial handshaking.
You can override the GNUTLS_LIBRARY and GNUTLS_INCLUDE_DIR CMake variables
to specify the locations of libgnutls and any dependencies. For instance,
adding
-DGNUTLS_INCLUDE_DIR=/usr/local/include \
-DGNUTLS_LIBRARY=/usr/local/lib/libgnutls.a
to the CMake command line would link TigerVNC against a static version of
libgnutls located under /usr/local.
======================================
Building Native Language Support (NLS)
======================================
NLS requires gettext, which is supplied with most Linux distributions and
with MinGW for Windows and which can easily be built from source on OS X and
other Unix variants.
You can override the ICONV_LIBRARIES and LIBINTL_LIBRARY CMake variables to
specify the locations of libiconv and libintl, respectively. For instance,
adding
-DLIBINTL_LIBRARY=/opt/gettext/lib/libintl.a
to the CMake command line would link TigerVNC against a static version of
libintl located under /opt/gettext. Adding
-DICONV_INCLUDE_DIR=/mingw/include \
-DICONV_LIBRARIES=/mingw/lib/libiconv.a \
-DGETTEXT_INCLUDE_DIR=/mingw/include \
-DLIBINTL_LIBRARY=/mingw/lib/libintl.a
to the CMake command line would link TigerVNC against the static versions of
libiconv and libintl included in the MinGW Developer Toolkit.
===================
Installing TigerVNC
===================
You can use the build system to install TigerVNC into a directory of your
choosing. To do this, add:
-DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX={install_directory}
to the CMake command line. Then, you can run 'make install' to build and
install it.
If you don't specify CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX, then the default is
c:\Program Files\TigerVNC on Windows and /usr/local on Unix.
=========================
Creating Release Packages
=========================
The following commands can be used to create various types of release packages:
Unix
----
make tarball
Create a binary tarball containing the TigerVNC Viewer
make servertarball
Create a binary tarball containing both the TigerVNC Server and Viewer
make dmg
Create Macintosh disk image file that contains an application bundle of the
TigerVNC Viewer
make udmg
On 64-bit OS X systems, this creates a version of the Macintosh package and
disk image which contains universal i386/x86-64 binaries. You should first
configure a 32-bit out-of-tree build of TigerVNC, then configure a 64-bit
out-of-tree build, then run 'make udmg' from the 64-bit build directory. The
build system will look for the 32-bit build under {source_directory}/osxx86
by default, but you can override this by setting the OSX_X86_BUILD CMake
variable to the directory containing your configured 32-bit build. Either
the 64-bit or 32-bit build can be configured to be backward compatible by
using the instructions in the "Build Recipes" section.
Windows
-------
make installer
Create a Windows installer using Inno Setup. The installer package
(TigerVNC[64].exe) will be located under {build_directory}.
=============
Build Recipes
=============
32-bit Build on 64-bit Linux/Unix (including OS X)
--------------------------------------------------
Set the following environment variables before building TigerVNC.
CFLAGS='-O3 -m32'
CXXFLAGS='-O3 -m32'
LDFLAGS=-m32
If you are building the TigerVNC Server on a modern Unix/Linux system, then
you will also need to pass the appropriate --host argument when configuring the
X server source (for instance, --host=i686-pc-linux-gnu).
64-bit Backward-Compatible Build on 64-bit OS X
-----------------------------------------------
Add
-DCMAKE_OSX_SYSROOT=/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.5.sdk \
-DCMAKE_OSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET=10.5
to the CMake command line. The OS X 10.5 SDK must be installed.
32-bit Backward-Compatible Build on 64-bit OS X
-----------------------------------------------
Set the following environment variables:
CC=gcc-4.0
CXX=g++-4.0
CFLAGS='-O3 -m32'
CXXFLAGS='-O3 -m32'
LDFLAGS=-m32
and add
-DCMAKE_OSX_SYSROOT=/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.4u.sdk \
-DCMAKE_OSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET=10.4
to the CMake command line. The OS X 10.4 SDK must be installed.
64-bit MinGW Build on Cygwin
----------------------------
cd {build_directory}
CC=/usr/bin/x86_64-w64-mingw32-gcc CXX=/usr/bin/x86_64-w64-mingw32-g++ \
RC=/usr/bin/x86_64-w64-mingw32-windres \
cmake -G "Unix Makefiles" -DCMAKE_SYSTEM_NAME=Windows \
-DCMAKE_AR=/usr/bin/x86_64-w64-mingw32-ar \
-DCMAKE_RANLIB=/usr/bin/x86_64-w64-mingw32-ranlib {source_directory}
make
This produces a 64-bit build of TigerVNC that does not depend on cygwin1.dll or
other Cygwin DLL's. The mingw64-x86_64-gcc-core and mingw64-x86_64-gcc-g++
packages (and their dependencies) must be installed.
32-bit MinGW Build on Cygwin
----------------------------
cd {build_directory}
CC=/usr/bin/i686-w64-mingw32-gcc CXX=/usr/bin/i686-w64-mingw32-g++ \
RC=/usr/bin/i686-w64-mingw32-windres \
cmake -G "Unix Makefiles" -DCMAKE_SYSTEM_NAME=Windows \
-DDCMAKE_AR=/usr/bin/i686-w64-mingw32-ar \
-DCMAKE_RANLIB=/usr/bin/i686-w64-mingw32-ranlib {source_directory}
make
This produces a 32-bit build of TigerVNC that does not depend on cygwin1.dll or
other Cygwin DLL's. The mingw64-i686-gcc-core and mingw64-i686-gcc-g++
packages (and their dependencies) must be installed.
MinGW-w64 Build on Windows
--------------------------
This produces a 64-bit build of TigerVNC using the "native" MinGW-w64 toolchain
(which is faster than the Cygwin version):
cd {build_directory}
CC={mingw-w64_binary_path}/x86_64-w64-mingw32-gcc \
CXX={mingw-w64_binary_path}/x86_64-w64-mingw32-g++ \
RC={mingw-w64_binary_path}/x86_64-w64-mingw32-windres \
cmake -G "MSYS Makefiles" \
-DCMAKE_AR={mingw-w64_binary_path}/x86_64-w64-mingw32-ar \
-DCMAKE_RANLIB={mingw-w64_binary_path}/x86_64-w64-mingw32-ranlib \
{source_directory}
make
MinGW Build on Linux
--------------------
cd {build_directory}
CC={mingw_binary_path}/i386-mingw32-gcc \
CXX={mingw_binary_path}/i386-mingw32-g++ \
RC={mingw_binary_path}/i386-mingw32-windres \
cmake -G "Unix Makefiles" -DCMAKE_SYSTEM_NAME=Windows \
-DCMAKE_AR={mingw_binary_path}/i386-mingw32-ar \
-DCMAKE_RANLIB={mingw_binary_path}/i386-mingw32-ranlib \
{source_directory}
make
===============================
Distribution-Specific Packaging
===============================
RPM Packages for RHEL / CentOS
------------------------------
The RPM spec files and patches used to create the nightly builds
and releases can be found in the "contrib/rpm/el{5,6}" directories
of the TigerVNC subversion trunk. All external source tarballs
must be fetched manually and placed into the 'SOURCES' directory
under the rpmbuild root. Additonally, the following macros need
to be defined:
EL6:
%debug_package %{nil}
EL5:
%dist .el5
%_smp_mflags -j3
%debug_package %{nil}
%__arch_install_post /usr/lib/rpm/check-rpaths /usr/lib/rpm/check-buildroot
Debian packages for Ubuntu 12.04LTS
-----------------------------------
The debian folder used to create the nightly builds and releases
can be found in the "contrib/deb/ubuntu-precise" directory of the
TigerVNC subversion trunk.