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Practical 3 - CIFAR10.ipynb
Practical 3 - Dog Breeds.ipynb
Practical 3 - MNIST.ipynb
README.md
requirements.txt

README.md

Practical 3: Classifying Dog Breeds (or Objects/Digits)

Due: 11. April (23:59)

Image from here.

Overview

Due to difficulty in training convolutional neural networks, for this practical you will have three options for image classification tasks each decreasing in difficulty. However to motivate students to do the more difficult options, extra credit will be awarded to each respectively.

Option 1: Dog Breed Classification

Identifying the breed of a dog is often a tedious process when the owner isn't nearby. You have to follow a classification tree of the dog's features one by one which is an arduous process. As a deep learning student, you realize that with your new found knowledge of convolutional neural networks, you can automate this process entirely. People can simply take a picture of the dog and your model can output what it thinks the breed of the dog is. Luckily, Udacity even has trianing data for this exact task that you can use.

Keep in mind that this option is the most difficult option and unless you have access to extremely powerful computational resources (Hint: AWS), it will take forever to train your model. As a result, I reccomend you follow what we've learnt about transfer learning to speed up the training. A good article on how to do it with Keras can be found here.

Extra Credit: Due to the difficult of this option, up to 15 extra credit points will be awarded if you successfully build a model that performs well on this dataset. If your model performs well, you get 10 extra points and in addition to those 10, you can get 5 more points for using transfer learning.

Option 2: CIFAR-10 Object Classification

CIFAR-10 is a famous image object dataset commonly used to train image classification models on. It consists of 10 classes (airplane, dog, deer, cat, automobile, bird, frog, horse, ship, truck). The classes are completely mutually exclusive. There is no overlap between automobiles and trucks. The goal of your model is to be able to accurately label each image given to you. The images are of size 32x32x3.

Keep in mind that while then number of classes is much less than the dog breed dataset (10 vs 133) there are a lot of training examples so it still takes some time to train. However, this dataset is much less computationally intensive so you should be able to train a shallow model from scratch. Using AWS is reccomended here to speed up the training time. Using transfer learning here is also a good option. In addition, you should include a confusion matrix in your analysis to give insight into where the model misclassifies certain digits. More information about the CIFAR-10 dataset can be found here.

Extra Credit: Due to the difficult of this option, up to 10 extra credit points will be awarded if you successfully build a model that performs well on this dataset. If your model performs well, you get 5 extra points and in addition to those 5, you can get 5 more points for using transfer learning.

Option 3: MNIST Digit Classification

MNIST is a famous dataset containing 28x28x1 (note it is black and white images) of handwritten digits from 0-9. The goal is to build a model that can classify the digit based on the image given. This dataset is incredibly small and due to the simplicity of the data, you should be able to achieve a super high accuracy (95%+ easily).

This option is the easiest and requires no use of AWS nor transfer learning. As a result, no extra credit will be awarded if you choose this option. In addition, you should include a confusion matrix in your analysis to give insight into where the model misclassifies certain digits. More information about the MNIST dataset can be found here.

Submission

Please only submit 1 notebook based on the option you chose. You will turn in the assigment using the submit server. Please make sure your zip file follows the format project_N_firstname_lastname.zip. Where N is the project number, firstname is your first name, and lastname is your last name. Failing to follow this will result in a 5 point deduction.

Assignment

Using what you've learnt in the class, build a convolutional neural network model that accomplishes this. It should output 133 values which sum up to 1 and are each the probability that the dog is of the respective breed. As you can guess, this is a multi-class classification problem. You can take advantage of Keras and any other preprocessing or data libraries in your code.

Notes

Since convolutional neural networks train on images, they take significantly longer to train than the standard neural nets we have dealt with before. To speed up trianing time, either resize images to a smaller size (try not to go below 32x32), train your models using AWS or Google Colab, or use transfer learning (extra credit). We didn't talk much about transfer learning in class due to time constraints but you can learn more about it here:

Downloading the Dog Breed Data

This project uses data provided by Udacity that is too large to upload to GitHub. To download the data, download the dogImages zip file from here and extract it to your project directory. Make sure that the dogImages directory is in the project directory and contains the train, test, and validation directories.

Coding (35 points):

This project is more open ended for implementation as in the real world you won't be given templates to fill your code in. We do however provide a Jupyter Notebook Practical 2 Code.ipynb containing a framework for implementing the code that you should follow. All of your code should be written in the Jupyter notebook.

Tne provided notebook is split into 4 different sections for each of the following tasks with each section titled "Section 1", "Section 2", etc. Make sure at the top of the section under the header, you give an explanation (minimum of 3 sentences) explaining what you did. The four sections are:

  1. Loading the data: Nothing to code.
  2. Building the model: Fill in at least two data augmentation methods to be used when training the model. An example of flipping the image has already been completed for you.
  3. Training the model: Nothing to code.
  4. Testing the model and results: In this section you will train the model and compute the accuracy of your model on the test data from Section 0. Make sure you very clearly have a cell that outputs and prints the percentage accuracy of your model. You will also include any code used to analyze the results here.

WARNING: We keep have a list of all the implementations and tutorials building models for this on the web. Copying code from them is considered academic dishonesty and will result in a report to the student honor council. However, please feel free to understand the logic behind their code and emulate it yourself. If you do this, please cite any articles in the README.md.

Analysis (15 points):

  1. What were the results of your model? Report any scores or figures you feel neccessary to explain your point. Solely reporting the accuracy will result in a minimal grade. We highly reccomend using figures, additional scores, and data analysis (e.g. which features are the best?).
  2. How did you decide on the best data augmentations for your model?
  3. How did you choose the parameters for your model (e.g. parameter sweep)?
  4. Did you notice anything interesting about the model performance?
  5. What challenges did you face when completing this task?

What to turn in

  1. Your Practical 3 Code.ipynb Jupyter notebook file containing your code. Please make sure you run all your cells before submitting so I don't have to run them on my end.
  2. Your model.h5 and model.json files that are saved after training.
  3. A README.md listing any extra packages that I need to run your code. Also contains any blogs or tutorials you looked at.
  4. An analysis.pdf file
    • pictures are better than text
    • include your name at the top of the PDF

Hints

  1. Follow the notebooks posted on the class webpage as a framework for how to load the data, process it, etc.
  2. Library documentation is your friend.
Thanks to Udacity for the Dog Breed Dataset and code to load it available here.
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