Unlock code that have sequence / ordering requirements
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
gradle/wrapper
src
.gitignore
.travis.yml
LICENCE
README.md
build.gradle
gradlew
gradlew.bat
settings.gradle

README.md

Ordered Scheduler ![Build Status] (https://travis-ci.org/Ullink/ordered-scheduler.svg?branch=master)

Unlock code that have sequence / ordering requirements

Inspired by the article Exploiting Data Parallelism in Ordered Data Streams from the Intel Guide for Developing Multithreaded Applications.

This implementation brings a lightweight solution for unlocking code that it only synchronized because of ordered/sequential requirements.

Use case

// called by multiple threads (e.g. thread pool)
public void execute()
{
  FooInput input;
  synchronized (this)
  {
    // this call needs to be synchronized along the write() to guarantee same ordering
    input = read();
    // this call is therefore not executed conccurently (#1)
    BarOutput output = process(input);
    // both write calls need to done in the same order as the read(),
    // forcing them to be under the same lock
    write(output);
  }
}

Performance drawbacks:

  • even though process() call may be thread-safe, it's not executed concurrently

Ordered Scheduler

OrderedScheduler scheduler = new OrderedScheduler()

public void execute()
{
  long ticket;
  FooInput input;
  synchronized (this)
  {
    input = read();

    // read() is successful. No exceptions. Let's take the ticket.
    // ticket will "record" the ordering of read() calls, and use it to guarantee same write() ordering
    ticket = getNextTicket();
  }
  
  try
  {
    // this will be executed concurrently (obviously needs to be thread-safe)
    BarOutput output = process(input);
  }
  catch(Exception e)
  {
    // Important to trash the ticket in case of a problem during the processing
    // otherwise scheduler.run() will wait infinitely
    scheduler.trash(ticket);
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  }
  
  // Let run the write() in the ticket order
  scheduler.run(ticket, () => { write(output); } );
}

Or, abstracting the OrderedScheduler usage with the provided Pattern classes:

GetInputProcessPushPattern<FooInput,BarOutput> pattern = new GetInputProcessPushPattern<>()

public void execute()
{
  pattern.execute(
            () => { read() },
            (input) => { process(input) },
            (output) => { write(output) } );
}

Performance benefits:

  • critical section has been reduced to the minimum (read() ordering)
  • process() is executed concurrently by the incoming threads
  • no extra thread/pool introduced (uses only the incoming/current ones)
  • no calls to kernel for lock or thread notifications
  • implementation is fast: lock-free and wait-free

Drawbacks:

  • a bit more user code
  • exceptions need to be handled in a separate callback