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Creating your first plugin

So you've decided to take the plunge and create your first Velocity plugin? That's awesome! This page will help you get you going.

Set up your environment

You're going to need the JDK and an IDE (we like IntelliJ IDEA, but any IDE will work).

I know how to do this. Give me what I need!

Maven repository

Name velocity
URL https://repo.velocitypowered.com/snapshots/

Dependency

Group ID com.velocitypowered
Artifact ID velocity-api
Version 1.0-SNAPSHOT

Setting up your first project

If you need help setting up your project, don't worry!

Set up your build system

You will need to set up a build system before you continue. Discussing how to set up a build system for your project is out of scope for this page, but you can look at the Gradle or Maven documentation for assistance.

Setting up the dependency with Gradle

Add the following to your build.gradle:

repositories {
    maven {
        name 'velocity'
        url 'https://repo.velocitypowered.com/snapshots/'
    }
}

dependencies {
    compile 'com.velocitypowered:velocity-api:1.0-SNAPSHOT'
}

Note

As of Gradle 5, you must also specify the API dependency as an annotation processor, otherwise plugin annotations won't be processed into the velocity-info.json file.

dependencies {
    compile 'com.velocitypowered:velocity-api:1.0-SNAPSHOT'
    annotationProcessor 'com.velocitypowered:velocity-api:1.0-SNAPSHOT'
}

Setting up the dependency with Maven

Add the following to your pom.xml:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>velocity</id>
        <url>https://repo.velocitypowered.com/snapshots/</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.velocitypowered</groupId>
        <artifactId>velocity-api</artifactId>
        <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
        <scope>provided</scope>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

Create the plugin class

Create a new class (let's say com.example.velocityplugin.VelocityTest and paste this in:

package com.example.velocityplugin;

import com.google.inject.Inject;
import com.velocitypowered.api.plugin.Plugin;
import com.velocitypowered.api.proxy.ProxyServer;
import org.slf4j.Logger;

@Plugin(id = "myfirstplugin", name = "My First Plugin", version = "1.0-SNAPSHOT",
        description = "I did it!", authors = {"Me"})
public class VelocityTest {
    private final ProxyServer server;
    private final Logger logger;

    @Inject
    public VelocityTest(ProxyServer server, Logger logger) {
        this.server = server;
        this.logger = logger;

        logger.info("Hello there, it's a test plugin I made!");
    }
}

What did you just do there? There's quite a bit to unpack, so let's focus on the Velocity-specific bits:

@Plugin(id = "myfirstplugin", name = "My First Plugin", version = "1.0-SNAPSHOT",
        description = "I did it!", authors = {"Me"})
public class VelocityTest {

This tells Velocity that this class contains your plugin (myfirstplugin) so that it can be loaded once the proxy starts up. Velocity will detect where the plugin will reside when you compile your plugin.

@Inject
public VelocityTest(ProxyServer server, Logger logger) {
    this.server = server;
    this.logger = logger;

    logger.info("Hello there, it's a test plugin I made!");
}

This looks like magic! How is Velocity doing this? The answer lies in the @Inject, which indicates that Velocity should inject a ProxyServer and the Logger when constructing your plugin. These two interfaces will help you out as you begin working with Velocity. We won't talk too much about dependency injection: all you need to know is that Velocity will do this.

All you need to do is build your plugin, put it in your plugins/ directory, and try it! Isn't that nice? In the next section you'll learn about how to use the API.