Wrapper class for MySQLi prepared statements to make your code concise.
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
.gitignore
CHANGELOG.md
LICENSE
README.md
composer.json
simple-mysqli.php

README.md

Simple MySQLi - MySQLi Wrapper

Using MySQLi prepared statements is a great way to prevent against SQL injection, but it can start feeling tedious after a while. I thought this could be improved a little, which is why wanted to create an easy to use MySQLi database wrapper, while also ensuring that the SQL queries aren't broken up into proprietary syntactic sugar chaining. This way, so you can have extremely concise code, while still keeping your SQL syntax intact. The purpose of this class is to make using plain SQL queries as enjoyable as possible, without being an ORM. In a lot of ways, I modeled this class after what I believe the general syntax for vanilla MySQLi/PDO should be.

I specifically chose MySQLi over PDO to have the versatiliy to use MySQL-specific features. Currently, the only ones I'm using are mysqli::info and proper closing/freeing methods. Unfortunately, asynchronous queries don't have support for prepared statements yet, so I'll wait until they do to implement them.

On a side note, if you'd like to know how to use MySQLi the "vanilla way", check out this tutorial on MySQLi Prepared Statements.

Why Should I Use Simple MySQLi?

  • Concise Code
  • Awesome fetch modes
  • SQL queries are the vanilla
  • Accounts for most common uses
  • Variable type is optional
  • Bind variables and values (not sure how useful this is though)

Why Not Use It?

  • No named parameters
  • If you need to use some of the more obscure MySQLi functions, then this is certainly not the right fit for you.
  • Only supports MySQL and MariaDB

The purpose of this class is to keep things as simple as possible, while accounting for the most common uses. If there's something you'd like me to add, feel free to suggest it or send a pull request.

Supported Versions

PHP 7.1+

Install

Click here to view changes to each version.

Composer

composer require websitebeaver/simple-mysqli

Then include or require the file in your php page.

require 'vendor/autoload.php';

Git

Clone either the latest version or by tag.

//Get by version number
git clone https://github.com/WebsiteBeaver/Simple-MySQLi/tree/{your version number}

//Get the latest
git clone https://github.com/WebsiteBeaver/Simple-MySQLi.git

Then include or require the file in your php page.

require 'simple-mysqli.php';

Table of Contents

Examples

Let's get straight to the point! The best way to learn is by examples.

Create a New MySQL Connection

One of the aspects of MySQLi I actually like a lot is the fact that error reporting is automatically turned off. Unfortunately I wasn't able to replicate this, as I throw an excpetion on the the constructor, therefore potentially exposing the parameter values. This is why I turned on mysqli reporting by doing mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT) — since you'll be wrapping it in a try/catch block anyway. So you must either wrap it around in a try/catch block or create your own custom handler. Make sure you use $e->getMessage() and not $e so your password isn't exposed. Either way, you must solely report your errors in your error log. To do this, make sure your php.ini file has the following settings in production: display_errors = Off and log_errors = On. Keep in mind that using echo, die or exit to print the error message is extremely dangerous as well.

Try/Catch

try {
  $mysqli = new SimpleMySQLi("localhost", "username", "password", "dbName", "utf8mb4", "assoc");
} catch(Exception $e) {
  error_log($e->getMessage());
  exit('Someting weird happened'); //Should be a message a typical user could understand
}

Custom Exception Handler

This is pretty neat, since you can avoid nesting. It is commonly used to redirect to a single error page, but can be used like the following as well. You can reassign this to give specific messages on your AJAX pages as well. This will catch all of your exceptions on each page this is used on. So you'll either have to call set_exception_handler() on each page or use restore_exception_handler() to revert to the previous one.

set_exception_handler(function($e) {
  error_log($e->getMessage());
  exit('Someting weird happened'); //Should be a message a typical user could understand
});
$mysqli = new SimpleMySQLi("localhost", "username", "password", "dbName", "utf8mb4", "assoc");

Insert, Update, Delete

Insert

$insert = $mysqli->query("INSERT INTO myTable (name, age) VALUES (?, ?)", [$_POST['name'], $_POST['age']]);
echo $insert->affectedRows();
echo $insert->insertId();

Update

$update = $mysqli->query("UPDATE myTable SET name = ? WHERE id = ?", [$_POST['name'], $_SESSION['id']]);
echo $update->affectedRows();

Delete

$delete = $mysqli->query("DELETE FROM myTable WHERE id = ?", [$_SESSION['id']]);
echo $delete->affectedRows();

Update Same Values

The problem with affectedRows() is that it will literally just tell you if any rows are affected. So if it returned 0, you wouldn't know if that means that the WHERE clause didn't match or that you updated the row with the same values. One solution Simple MySQLi offers is to use info(), which utilizes mysqli::info and converts the result string to an array. You can use this in other queries it supports as well.

$update = $mysqli->query("UPDATE myTable SET name = ? WHERE id = ?", [$_POST['name'], $_SESSION['id']]);
echo $update->affectedRows();
var_export($update->info()); //For more specific version

Here's what info() would print. This could be useful for checking if you updated your values with the exact same as the old ones.

['Rows matched' => 1, 'Changed' => 0, 'Warnings' => 0]

This is nice and all, but it might be more convenient in some cases to just change the behavior of affectedRows() to use rows matched, rather than rows changed.

$update = $mysqli->query("UPDATE myTable SET name = ? WHERE id = ?", [$_POST['name'], $_SESSION['id']]);
echo $update->rowsMatched(); //Rows Matched: 1
echo $update->affectedRows(); //Rows Changed: 0

Select

You can either fetch your entire result in an array with fetchAll() or loop through each row individually with fetch(), if you're planning on modifying the array. You could obviously use fetchAll() for any scenario, but using fetch() is more efficient memory-wise if you're making changes to the array, as it will save you from having to loop through it a second time. However, from my experience, most queries don't need any modifications, so fetchAll() should primarily be used. If you just need one row, then obviously fetch() should be used.

Fetch Associative Array

$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [4])->fetchAll("assoc");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[
  ['id' => 24 'name' => 'Jerry', 'age' => 14],
  ['id' => 201 'name' => 'Alexa', 'age' => 22]
]

Fetch Array of Objects

$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [4])->fetchAll("obj");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[
  stdClass Object ['id' => 24 'name' => 'Jerry', 'age' => 14],
  stdClass Object ['id' => 201 'name' => 'Alexa', 'age' => 22]
]

You can even fetch into a new instance of a class.

class myClass {}
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [4])->fetchAll("obj", "myClass");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[
  myClass Object ['id' => 24 'name' => 'Jerry', 'age' => 14],
  myClass Object ['id' => 201 'name' => 'Alexa', 'age' => 22]
]

Fetch Single Row

$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [12])->fetch("assoc");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

['id' => 24 'name' => 'Jerry', 'age' => 14]

Fetch Single Row Like bind_result()

$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM myTable WHERE name = ?", [$_POST['name']])->fetchAll("num"); //must use number array to use in list
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
list($id, $name, $age) = $arr;
echo $age; //Output 34

Fetch Scalar (Single Value)

This is an ideal way of fetching a scalar. Using the MySQL COUNT function gives you a number, so you can easily check for truthiness, as no rows would give you a value of 0.

$count = $mysqli->query("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE name = ?", [$_POST['name']])->fetch("col");
if(!$count) exit('No rows');
echo $count; //Output: 284

But what if you were to fetch a single value from your database in scenario where the column could have a boolean value, like NULL or 0? This would make it impossible to distinguish between no rows or a falsy values. This is why I'd suggest using numRows() in every other case instead.

$favoriteSport = $mysqli->query("SELECT favorite_sport FROM myTable WHERE id = ?", [23])->fetch("col");
if($favoriteSport->numRows() < 1) exit('No rows');
echo $favoriteSport; //Output: 'basketball'

Fetch Single Column as Array

$heights = $mysqli->query("SELECT height FROM myTable WHERE id < ?", [500])->fetchAll("col");
if(!$heights) exit('No rows');
var_export($heights);

Output:

[78, 64, 68, 54, 58, 63]

Fetch Each Column as Separate Array Variable

$result = $mysqli->query("SELECT name, email, number FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [450]);
while($row = $result->fetch("assoc")) {
  $names[] = $row['name'];
  $emails[] = $row['email'];
  $numbers[] = $row['number'];
}
if(!isset($names) || !isset($emails) || !isset($numbers)) exit('No rows');
var_export($names);

Output:

['Bobby', 'Jessica', 'Victor', 'Andrew', 'Mallory']

Fetch Key/Value Pair

//First column must be unique, like a primary key; can only select 2 columns
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name FROM myTable WHERE age <= ?", [25])->fetchAll("keyPair");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[7 => 'Jerry', 10 => 'Bill', 29 => 'Bobby']

Fetch Key/Value Pair Array

//First column must be unique, like a primary key
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, max_bench, max_squat FROM myTable WHERE weight < ?", [205])->fetchAll("keyPairArr");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[
  17 => ['max_bench' => 230, 'max_squat' => 175],
  84 => ['max_bench' => 195, 'max_squat' => 235],
  136 => ['max_bench' => 135, 'max_squat' => 285]
]

Fetch in Groups

//First column must be common value to group by
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT eye_color, name, weight FROM myTable WHERE age < ?", [29])->fetchAll("group");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[
  'green' => [
    ['name' => 'Patrick', 'weight' => 178],
    ['name' => 'Olivia', 'weight' => 132]
  ],
  'blue' => [
    ['name' => 'Kyle', 'weight' => 128],
    ['name' => 'Ricky', 'weight' => 143]
  ],
  'brown' => [
    ['name' => 'Jordan', 'weight' => 173],
    ['name' => 'Eric', 'weight' => 198]
  ]
]

Fetch in Groups, One Column

//First column must be common value to group by
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT eye_color, name FROM myTable WHERE age < ?", [29])->fetchAll("groupCol");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Output:

[
  'green' => ['Patrick', 'Olivia'],
  'blue' => ['Kyle', 'Ricky'],
  'brown' => ['Jordan', 'Eric']
]

Fetch in Groups, Object Array

//First column must be common value to group by
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT eye_color, name, weight FROM myTable WHERE age < ?", [29])->fetchAll("groupObj");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

You can even pass in a class name, like you would with 'obj'.

$mysqli->query("SELECT eye_color, name, weight FROM myTable WHERE age < ?", [29])->fetchAll("groupObj", "myClass");

Output:

[
  'green' => [
    stdClass Object ['name' => 'Patrick', 'weight' => 178],
    stdClass Object ['name' => 'Olivia', 'weight' => 132]
  ],
  'blue' => [
    stdClass Object ['name' => 'Kyle', 'weight' => 128],
    stdClass Object ['name' => 'Ricky', 'weight' => 143]
  ],
  'brown' => [
    stdClass Object ['name' => 'Jordan', 'weight' => 173],
    stdClass Object ['name' => 'Eric', 'weight' => 198]
  ]
]

Like

$search = "%{$_POST['search']}%";
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE name LIKE ?", [$search])->fetchAll();
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Where In Array

$inArr = [12, 23, 44];
$clause = $mysqli->whereIn($inArr); //Create question marks
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT event_name, description, location FROM events WHERE id IN($clause)", $inArr)->fetchAll();
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

With Other Placeholders

$inArr = [12, 23, 44];
$clause = $mysqli->whereIn($inArr); //Create question marks
$fullArr = array_merge($inArr, [5]); //Merge WHERE IN values with rest of query
$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT event_name, description, location FROM events WHERE id IN($clause) AND id < ?", $fullArr)->fetchAll();
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
var_export($arr);

Transactions

This is probably my favorite aspect of this class, since the difference in terms of lines of code is absurd. This will also automatically rollback if affectedRows() is less than one, in case zero rows are affected, which wouldn't trigger an exception. If any error occurs, it will append the message to your error log. Additionally, it will throw any exception if affectedRows() equals zero.

$sql[] = "INSERT INTO myTable (name, age) VALUES (?, ?)";
$sql[] = "UPDATE myTable SET name = ? WHERE id = ?";
$sql[] = "UPDATE myTable SET name = ? WHERE id = ?";
$arrOfValues = [[$_POST['name'], $_POST['age']], ['Pablo', 34], [$_POST['name'], $_SESSION['id']]];
$mysqli->atomicQuery($sql, $arrOfValues);

Same Template, Different Values

$sql = "INSERT INTO myTable (name, age) VALUES (?, ?)";
$arrOfValues = [[$_POST['name'], $_POST['age']], ['Pablo', 34], [$_POST['name'], 22]];
$mysqli->atomicQuery($sql, $arrOfValues);

Transactions with Callbacks

The regular way of doing transactions in Simple MySQLi with atomicQuery() is exceedingly concise and can be used in most cases. However, sometimes you might want a little more control. For instance, under the hood, it only checks if each query's affectedRows() is greater than one. This isn't suitable for a query like INSERT multiple or DELETE/UPDATE query that affects multiple rows.

There's also no need to start the transaction, nor deal with rollbacks. If you want to rollback, simply throw an exception, and it'll rollback for you, while printing the exception solely in the error log. Execute allows you to efficiently reuse your prepared statement with different values.

$mysqli->transaction(function($mysqli) {
  $insert = $mysqli->query("INSERT INTO myTable (sender, receiver) VALUES (?, ?)", [28, 330]);
  if($insert->affectedRows() < 1) throw new Exception('Error inserting');
  echo $insert->insertId();
  $insert->execute([243, 49]); //reuse same insert query
  $delete = $mysqli->query("DELETE FROM myTable WHERE max_bench < ?", [125]);
});

Error Exception Handling

Either wrap all your queries with one try/catch or use the set_exception_handler() function to either redirect to a global error page or a separate one for each page. Don't forget to take out echo in production, as you obviously do not need the client to see this information.

Gotcha with Exception Handling

For some reason, mysqli_sql_exception doesn't correctly convert errors to exceptions when too many bound variables or types on bind_param(). This is why you should probably set a global error handler to convert this error to an exception. I'm showing how to convert all errors to exceptions, but it should be noted that a lot of programmers view this as controversial. In this case you only really have to worry about E_WARNING anyway.

set_error_handler(function($errno, $errstr, $errfile, $errline) {
  throw new Exception("$errstr on line $errline in file $errfile");
});

Try/Catch

//include mysqli_connect.php
try {
  $insert = $mysqli->query("INSERT INTO myTable (name, age) VALUES (?, ?)", [$_POST['name'], $_POST['age']]);
} catch (Exception $e) {
  error_log($e);
  exit('Error inserting');
}

Custom Exception Handler

//include mysqli_connect.php
set_exception_handler(function($e) {
  error_log($e);
  exit('Error inserting');
});
$insert = $mysqli->query("INSERT INTO myTable (name, age) VALUES (?, ?)", [$_POST['name'], $_POST['age']]);

Freeing and Closing

Freeing the result and closing the prepared statement is very simple.

$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [4])->fetchAll("assoc");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
$mysqli->freeResult(); //Free result
$mysqli->closeStmt(); //Close statement
$mysqli->close(); //Close connection

You can even chain them.

$arr = $mysqli->query("SELECT id, name, age FROM events WHERE id <= ?", [4])->fetchAll("assoc");
if(!$arr) exit('No rows');
$mysqli->freeResult()->closeStmt()->close();

Documentation

Constructor

new SimpleMySQLi(string $host, string $username, string $password, string $dbName, string $charset = 'utf8mb4', string $defaultFetchType = 'assoc')

Parameters

  • string $host - Hostname or an IP address, like localhost or 127.0.0.1
  • string $username - Database username
  • string $password - Database password
  • string $dbName - Database name
  • string $charset = 'utf8mb4' (optional) - Default character encoding
  • string defaultFetchType = 'assoc' (optional) - Default fetch type. Can be:
    • 'assoc' - Associative array
    • 'obj' - Object array
    • 'num' - Number array
    • 'col' - 1D array. Same as PDO::FETCH_COLUMN

Throws

  • SimpleMySQLiException if $defaultFetchType specified isn't one of the allowed fetch modes
  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

query()

function query(string $sql, array|string|int $values = [], string $types = ''): self

Description

All queries go here. If select statement, needs to be used with either fetch() for single row and loop fetching or fetchAll() for fetching all results.

Parameters

  • string $sql - SQL query
  • array|string|int $values = [] (optional) - values or variables to bind to query; can be empty for selecting all rows
  • string $types = '' (optional) - variable type for each bound value/variable

Returns

$this

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

execute()

function execute(array $values = [], string $types = ''): self

Description

Used in order to be more efficient if same SQL is used with different values. Is really a re-execute function

Parameters

  • array $values = [] (optional) - values or variables to bind to query; can be empty for selecting all rows
  • string $types = '' (optional) - variable type for each bound value/variable

Returns

$this

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

whereIn()

function whereIn(array $inArr): string

Description

Create correct number of questions marks for WHERE IN() array.

Parameters

  • array $inArr - array used in WHERE IN clause

Returns

string Correct number of question marks

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

numRows()

function numRows(): int

Description

Get number of rows from SELECT.

Returns

  • int $mysqli->num_rows

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

affectedRows()

function affectedRows(): int

Description

Get affected rows. Can be used instead of numRows() in SELECT

Returns

  • int $mysqli->affected_rows

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

info()

function info(): array

Description

A more specific version of affectedRows() to give you more info what happened. Uses $mysqli::info under the hood. Can be used for the following cases

Returns

  • array Associative array converted from result string

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

rowsMatched()

function rowsMatched(): int

Description

Get rows matched instead of rows changed. Can strictly be used on UPDATE. Otherwise returns false

Returns

  • int Rows matched

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

insertId()

function insertId(): int

Description

Get the latest primary key inserted

Returns

  • int $mysqli->insert_id

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

fetch()

function fetch(string $fetchType = '', string $className = 'stdClass', array $classParams = [])

Description

Fetch one row at a time

Parameters

  • string $fetchType = '' (optional) - This overrides the default fetch type set in the constructor. Check here for possible values
  • string $className = 'stdClass' (optional) - Class name to fetch into if 'obj' $fetchType
  • array $classParams = [] (optional) - Array of constructor parameters for class if 'obj' $fetchType

Returns

  • 1 array row of $fetchType specified
  • Scalar If 'col' type selected
  • NULL if at the end of loop (same behavior as vanilla MySQLi)

Throws

  • SimpleMySQLiException
    • If $fetchType specified isn't one of the allowed fetch modes
    • If fetch mode specification is violated
  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

fetchAll()

function fetchAll(string $fetchType = '', string $className = 'stdClass'): array

Description

Fetch all results in array

Parameters

  • string $fetchType = '' (optional) - This overrides the default fetch type set in the constructor. Check here for possible values. fetchAll() also has additional fetch modes:
    • 'keyPair' - Unique key (1st column) to single value (2nd column). Same as PDO::FETCH_KEY_PAIR
    • 'keyPairArr' - Unique key (1st column) to array. Same as PDO::FETCH_UNIQUE
    • 'group' - Group by common values in the 1st column into associative subarrays. Same as PDO::FETCH_GROUP
    • 'groupCol' - Group by common values in the 1st column into 1D subarray. Same as PDO::FETCH_GROUP | PDO::FETCH_COLUMN
    • 'groupObj' - Group by common values in the first column into object subarrays. Same as PDO::FETCH_GROUP | PDO::FETCH_CLASS
  • string $className = 'stdClass' (optional) - Class name to fetch into if 'obj' $fetchType
  • array $classParams = [] (optional) - Array of constructor parameters for class if 'obj' $fetchType

Returns

  • array Full array of $fetchType specified
  • array [] if no results

Throws

  • SimpleMySQLiException
    • If $fetchType specified isn't one of the allowed fetch modes
    • If fetch mode specification is violated
  • mysqli_sql_exception If any mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

atomicQuery()

function atomicQuery(array|string $sql, array $values, array $types = []): void

Description

Just a normal transaction that will automatically rollback and print your message to your error log. Will also rollback if affectedRows() is less than 1.

Parameters

  • array|string $sql - SQL query; can be array for different queries or a string for the same query with different values
  • array $values - Values or variables to bind to query
  • array $types = [] (optional) - Array of variable type for each bound value/variable

Throws

  • SimpleMySQLiException If there is a mismatch in parameter values, parameter types or SQL
  • mysqli_sql_exception If transaction failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

transaction()

function transaction(callable $callback($this)): void

Description

Do stuff inside of transaction

Parameters

  • callable $callback($this) - Closure to do transaction operations inside. Parameter value is $this

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If transaction failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

freeResult()

function freeResult(): self

Description

Frees MySQL result

Returns

$this

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

closeStmt()

function closeStmt(): self

Description

Closes MySQL prepared statement

Returns

$this

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

close()

function close(): void

Description

Closes the MySQL connections

Throws

  • mysqli_sql_exception If mysqli function failed due to mysqli_report(MYSQLI_REPORT_ERROR | MYSQLI_REPORT_STRICT)

Changelog

Changelog can be found here