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Better support for non-latin font fallbacks #59

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melchoyce opened this Issue Sep 11, 2016 · 49 comments

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melchoyce commented Sep 11, 2016

One thing Twenty Sixteen really wanted to do but ran out of time to do was really rock-solid support for non-latin alphabets. I’d love, love if any polyglots and i18n folks could help us figure out a way to make that happen!

https://github.com/impallari/Libre-Franklin has super great language support, but as far as I can tell, it's limited to latin alphabets.

In an ideal world, if characters aren't supported by Libre Franklin, we'd be able to specify an alternate default font for those languages that looks great.

Off the top of my head, I’d REALLY love Twenty Seventeen to have good font fallbacks for Cyrillic, Arabic, Vietnamese, Thai, Japanese, and Chinese. If there are other languages with non-latin alphabets you think need to be included, please chime in.


9/30 Edit

List of alphabets we want to try support:

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There is also Hindi and Korean which have a different script. I suppose Urdu and Persian are covered with the Arabic script.

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grappler commented Sep 11, 2016

There is also Hindi and Korean which have a different script. I suppose Urdu and Persian are covered with the Arabic script.

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vijayaraghavanramanan Sep 11, 2016

If there are other languages with non-latin alphabets you think need to be included, please chime in.

Greek.

A lot of sites which use mathematical expressions/equations need it. Mathy people use Greek alphabets as symbols.

vijayaraghavanramanan commented Sep 11, 2016

If there are other languages with non-latin alphabets you think need to be included, please chime in.

Greek.

A lot of sites which use mathematical expressions/equations need it. Mathy people use Greek alphabets as symbols.

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acosmin Sep 11, 2016

Maybe we can add two or three fonts as a select option (for both body text and headings) in the Customizer and add styles for each of those fonts, like line-height, word/letter spacing.

acosmin commented Sep 11, 2016

Maybe we can add two or three fonts as a select option (for both body text and headings) in the Customizer and add styles for each of those fonts, like line-height, word/letter spacing.

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petyaraykovska Sep 11, 2016

Mel, thanks so much for the early consideration of this.

Based on http://wordpress.org/about/stats and the overall stats for world languages (some of which have just been completed or are close to 100% for WordPress, so adoption should raise from 4.7 on), here are some of the languages/scripts that are not on the list that I think should be supported or have a fall back font.

  • Hebrew
  • Greek
  • Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, some of the other languages of India that are actively worked on right now use Devanagari script

Thank you, let me know if I can help with anything else - happy to help with testing all these when the time comes.

petyaraykovska commented Sep 11, 2016

Mel, thanks so much for the early consideration of this.

Based on http://wordpress.org/about/stats and the overall stats for world languages (some of which have just been completed or are close to 100% for WordPress, so adoption should raise from 4.7 on), here are some of the languages/scripts that are not on the list that I think should be supported or have a fall back font.

  • Hebrew
  • Greek
  • Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, some of the other languages of India that are actively worked on right now use Devanagari script

Thank you, let me know if I can help with anything else - happy to help with testing all these when the time comes.

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BharatKaravadra Sep 11, 2016

The Gujarati language of India should be considered and seem to use Gujarati script.

I speak but do not read or write Gujarati, but should be able to find someone to help if required.

BharatKaravadra commented Sep 11, 2016

The Gujarati language of India should be considered and seem to use Gujarati script.

I speak but do not read or write Gujarati, but should be able to find someone to help if required.

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vijayaraghavanramanan Sep 11, 2016

@melchoyce

Is this something that might interest you?

https://www.google.com/get/noto/

When text is rendered by a computer, sometimes characters are displayed as “tofu”. They are little boxes to indicate your device doesn’t have a font to display the text.

Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel. Noto is Google’s answer to tofu. The name noto is to convey the idea that Google’s goal is to see “no more tofu”. Noto has multiple styles and weights, and is freely available to all. The comprehensive set of fonts and tools used in our development is available in our GitHub repositories.

vijayaraghavanramanan commented Sep 11, 2016

@melchoyce

Is this something that might interest you?

https://www.google.com/get/noto/

When text is rendered by a computer, sometimes characters are displayed as “tofu”. They are little boxes to indicate your device doesn’t have a font to display the text.

Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel. Noto is Google’s answer to tofu. The name noto is to convey the idea that Google’s goal is to see “no more tofu”. Noto has multiple styles and weights, and is freely available to all. The comprehensive set of fonts and tools used in our development is available in our GitHub repositories.

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@petyaraykovska Do you know if polyglots team have any developers who might be interested in exploring the best way to tackle this problem from a technical standpoint?

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melchoyce commented Sep 11, 2016

@petyaraykovska Do you know if polyglots team have any developers who might be interested in exploring the best way to tackle this problem from a technical standpoint?

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petyaraykovska Sep 12, 2016

@melchoyce There are several people that might be able to help, given they have availability. I'll reach out.

petyaraykovska commented Sep 12, 2016

@melchoyce There are several people that might be able to help, given they have availability. I'll reach out.

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slaFFik Sep 20, 2016

Also please consider Cyrillic.

slaFFik commented Sep 20, 2016

Also please consider Cyrillic.

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nukaga Sep 21, 2016

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Japanese font

font-family: "Yu Gothic", YuGothic, "Hiragino angle Gore-Pro", "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro", "Meiryo", Meiryo;
  font-weight: 500;

YuGothic is Beautiful font. But Windows 8.1 only becomes thinner. So font-weight: 500; you will need.
If you are distributed each language, we want you to adopt the YuGothic.

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nukaga commented Sep 21, 2016

Japanese font

font-family: "Yu Gothic", YuGothic, "Hiragino angle Gore-Pro", "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro", "Meiryo", Meiryo;
  font-weight: 500;

YuGothic is Beautiful font. But Windows 8.1 only becomes thinner. So font-weight: 500; you will need.
If you are distributed each language, we want you to adopt the YuGothic.

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Sorry,
Japanese font

font-family: "游ゴシック", "Yu Gothic", YuGothic, 'ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3', "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro", "メイリオ", Meiryo, sans-serif;
font-weight: 500;

I tried the Japanese of Twenty Seventeen.
I think this will be good.

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nukaga commented Sep 21, 2016

Sorry,
Japanese font

font-family: "游ゴシック", "Yu Gothic", YuGothic, 'ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3', "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro", "メイリオ", Meiryo, sans-serif;
font-weight: 500;

I tried the Japanese of Twenty Seventeen.
I think this will be good.

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naokomc Sep 23, 2016

Seconding what Petya said. Mel, thanks for bringing this up!

To add a little more information to @nukaga's comment - if you are going to be specifying Japanese fonts based on the UI language of the frontend, we think including Yu Gothinc (which is the same as 游ゴシック) is a good idea. If we do this though, we also need font-weight: 500 to avoid an issue with Win 8.1.

However, if the application is not language speicific, here is an alternative which doesn't tneed the font-weight speicification.

font-family: "ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3", "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro", "メイリオ", Meiryo, sans-serif;

naokomc commented Sep 23, 2016

Seconding what Petya said. Mel, thanks for bringing this up!

To add a little more information to @nukaga's comment - if you are going to be specifying Japanese fonts based on the UI language of the frontend, we think including Yu Gothinc (which is the same as 游ゴシック) is a good idea. If we do this though, we also need font-weight: 500 to avoid an issue with Win 8.1.

However, if the application is not language speicific, here is an alternative which doesn't tneed the font-weight speicification.

font-family: "ヒラギノ角ゴ Pro W3", "Hiragino Kaku Gothic Pro", "メイリオ", Meiryo, sans-serif;

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woraperth Sep 24, 2016

Hello, I just test Twenty Seventeen for Thai content. Font size and line-height looks great, but letter-spacing on headings could be removed to make it more suitable for Thai language :)

This is the screenshot of current Twenty Seventeen: http://file.designil.com/19Ub2
This is the screenshot of Twenty Seventeen after removing letter-spacing: http://file.designil.com/K3dz

Please take it into consideration :)

woraperth commented Sep 24, 2016

Hello, I just test Twenty Seventeen for Thai content. Font size and line-height looks great, but letter-spacing on headings could be removed to make it more suitable for Thai language :)

This is the screenshot of current Twenty Seventeen: http://file.designil.com/19Ub2
This is the screenshot of Twenty Seventeen after removing letter-spacing: http://file.designil.com/K3dz

Please take it into consideration :)

imnok added a commit to imnok/twentyseventeen that referenced this issue Sep 24, 2016

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Thinking about implementation...

What I'd really like to do is figure out from WordPress core itself what Site Language a user has set, and then load separate fonts for those languages. However, that could be weird if someone is using WordPress in a different language, but writing in English. I'm not sure how often that happens? Would love some input here.

The other idea I have (which isn't ideal since it's a manual process) is to have a theme setting that lets you select language, and then we load a different font stack (probably using system fonts) based on your language selection. This is probably the easiest way to approach better i18n support.

Does anyone have any other technical suggestions for implementing this? I admit my ideas are very much limited by my own development experience and WordPress knowledge.

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melchoyce commented Sep 24, 2016

Thinking about implementation...

What I'd really like to do is figure out from WordPress core itself what Site Language a user has set, and then load separate fonts for those languages. However, that could be weird if someone is using WordPress in a different language, but writing in English. I'm not sure how often that happens? Would love some input here.

The other idea I have (which isn't ideal since it's a manual process) is to have a theme setting that lets you select language, and then we load a different font stack (probably using system fonts) based on your language selection. This is probably the easiest way to approach better i18n support.

Does anyone have any other technical suggestions for implementing this? I admit my ideas are very much limited by my own development experience and WordPress knowledge.

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I'd ping @justintadlock for ideas on technical suggestions on this one.

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samikeijonen commented Sep 24, 2016

I'd ping @justintadlock for ideas on technical suggestions on this one.

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justintadlock Sep 24, 2016

I've been trying some different things with non-Latin (and just non-English in general) languages. It depends on the theme, but some of the things I've done:

  • I have a script that allows far more specific stylesheets than core's locale style.
  • In my latest theme that uses Google Fonts, I have some fallbacks to their Noto Sans fonts. This is filterable.
  • I've got several scripts that just extend theme functionality based on locale. Just depends on what we're looking for.

It'd be particularly easy to set up language-based font stacks and grab the locale. Match up the locale to the font stack. Then, allow people to filter.

How things are implemented really comes down, at least to me, to whether you're going with system fonts or Google Fonts.

Then, it comes down to where you define the CSS:

  • Add to wp_head.
  • Locale-specific stylesheets.
  • Drop everything into style.css.

I usually design my themes with a non-Latin foreign language enabled from early on so that I don't forget that English-first users are just a small part of my audience. If you take that approach with theme building, solutions will happen naturally.

justintadlock commented Sep 24, 2016

I've been trying some different things with non-Latin (and just non-English in general) languages. It depends on the theme, but some of the things I've done:

  • I have a script that allows far more specific stylesheets than core's locale style.
  • In my latest theme that uses Google Fonts, I have some fallbacks to their Noto Sans fonts. This is filterable.
  • I've got several scripts that just extend theme functionality based on locale. Just depends on what we're looking for.

It'd be particularly easy to set up language-based font stacks and grab the locale. Match up the locale to the font stack. Then, allow people to filter.

How things are implemented really comes down, at least to me, to whether you're going with system fonts or Google Fonts.

Then, it comes down to where you define the CSS:

  • Add to wp_head.
  • Locale-specific stylesheets.
  • Drop everything into style.css.

I usually design my themes with a non-Latin foreign language enabled from early on so that I don't forget that English-first users are just a small part of my audience. If you take that approach with theme building, solutions will happen naturally.

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joyously Sep 27, 2016

Couldn't it be as simple as this?

html {font-family: /*whatever the default font stack is */}
html[lang=nl-be] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Dutch is */}
html[lang=ka-ge] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Georgian is */}
html[lang=hi-in] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Hindi is */}
html[lang=he-il] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Hebrew is */}

etc. for all the languages that need something besides the default font stack.

joyously commented Sep 27, 2016

Couldn't it be as simple as this?

html {font-family: /*whatever the default font stack is */}
html[lang=nl-be] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Dutch is */}
html[lang=ka-ge] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Georgian is */}
html[lang=hi-in] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Hindi is */}
html[lang=he-il] {font-family: /*whatever the font stack for Hebrew is */}

etc. for all the languages that need something besides the default font stack.

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I had no idea you could specify lang in CSS and honestly that is super, super cool.

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melchoyce commented Sep 27, 2016

I had no idea you could specify lang in CSS and honestly that is super, super cool.

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joyously Sep 27, 2016

You can use HTML attributes as selectors. Just make sure that the lang attribute is output on the html tag, which is typical.

joyously commented Sep 27, 2016

You can use HTML attributes as selectors. Just make sure that the lang attribute is output on the html tag, which is typical.

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woraperth Sep 27, 2016

I suggest adding an option to select language of the content (apart from language of admin backend). Because most of the time many people I know use English backend because they are used to it, and write content in another language :)

woraperth commented Sep 27, 2016

I suggest adding an option to select language of the content (apart from language of admin backend). Because most of the time many people I know use English backend because they are used to it, and write content in another language :)

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You will need a plugin for this. Either to set the admin language to English or save the post language. This is either plugin or core territory.

Related discussions:
https://github.com/glueckpress/wordpress-post-language
https://make.wordpress.org/core/2015/06/29/wordcamp-europe-2015-multilingual-discussion/

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grappler commented Sep 27, 2016

You will need a plugin for this. Either to set the admin language to English or save the post language. This is either plugin or core territory.

Related discussions:
https://github.com/glueckpress/wordpress-post-language
https://make.wordpress.org/core/2015/06/29/wordcamp-europe-2015-multilingual-discussion/

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woraperth Sep 27, 2016

Thank you @grappler ! That's neat.
Then something like html[lang=xxx] which @joyously mentioned would be sufficient :)

woraperth commented Sep 27, 2016

Thank you @grappler ! That's neat.
Then something like html[lang=xxx] which @joyously mentioned would be sufficient :)

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vijayaraghavanramanan Sep 27, 2016

Is this server side?

The only simple way as far as I know about having as much language support as possible is via CSS unicode-range.

There are some issues with browser support as browsers such as Safari 9 and Edge will download fonts even if not needed.

Another way: Typekit uses javascript to figure out all the unicode glyphs needed in a page and then downloads custom font files.

vijayaraghavanramanan commented Sep 27, 2016

Is this server side?

The only simple way as far as I know about having as much language support as possible is via CSS unicode-range.

There are some issues with browser support as browsers such as Safari 9 and Edge will download fonts even if not needed.

Another way: Typekit uses javascript to figure out all the unicode glyphs needed in a page and then downloads custom font files.

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See also the :lang CSS pseudo-class: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/:lang

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ntwb commented Sep 27, 2016

See also the :lang CSS pseudo-class: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/:lang

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waviaei Sep 28, 2016

I don't think it will be as simple as:

html {font-family: /_whatever the default font stack is */}
html[lang=nl-be] {font-family: /_whatever the font stack for Dutch is */}
...

At least in Japanese, you will need to finely adjust line-height, font-size, font-weight, etc. I am sure there are other languages out there where simply specifying different font-family is not a good-enough solution. You can, of course, code everything, but that means we will be loading lots of language specific styles that might not be needed at all.

EDIT
Some discussions has been happening on Japanese Slack. I am sure @nukaga or @naokomc will report some feedbacks of that :-)

waviaei commented Sep 28, 2016

I don't think it will be as simple as:

html {font-family: /_whatever the default font stack is */}
html[lang=nl-be] {font-family: /_whatever the font stack for Dutch is */}
...

At least in Japanese, you will need to finely adjust line-height, font-size, font-weight, etc. I am sure there are other languages out there where simply specifying different font-family is not a good-enough solution. You can, of course, code everything, but that means we will be loading lots of language specific styles that might not be needed at all.

EDIT
Some discussions has been happening on Japanese Slack. I am sure @nukaga or @naokomc will report some feedbacks of that :-)

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woraperth Sep 28, 2016

@ntwb I second that. The browser support is great. :D

@waviaei I agree. I think we can add the code like @imnok did here:
imnok@47e6964

woraperth commented Sep 28, 2016

@ntwb I second that. The browser support is great. :D

@waviaei I agree. I think we can add the code like @imnok did here:
imnok@47e6964

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vijayaraghavanramanan Sep 28, 2016

Is there a demo for this?

vijayaraghavanramanan commented Sep 28, 2016

Is there a demo for this?

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For folks who read in any of the alphabets list in #59 (comment), what websites do you visit in those alphabets that you find professional looking and easy to read? Looking for font-stack inspiration.

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melchoyce commented Oct 10, 2016

For folks who read in any of the alphabets list in #59 (comment), what websites do you visit in those alphabets that you find professional looking and easy to read? Looking for font-stack inspiration.

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NateWr Oct 11, 2016

The script for Urdu is very similar to that which would be used for Arabic, Farsi and Pashto, and I'd expect things like workable font sizes and line heights to be the same. The BBC has font variations available for each.

Another consideration for languages based on Arabic script is that text-transform: uppercase is meaningless. I'm not sure if this is used in TwentySeventeen but it's something worth noting.

NateWr commented Oct 11, 2016

The script for Urdu is very similar to that which would be used for Arabic, Farsi and Pashto, and I'd expect things like workable font sizes and line heights to be the same. The BBC has font variations available for each.

Another consideration for languages based on Arabic script is that text-transform: uppercase is meaningless. I'm not sure if this is used in TwentySeventeen but it's something worth noting.

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yoavf Oct 13, 2016

I've just checked a few of my favorite Hebrew sites. Most good ones use web fonts. An exception would be newspaper site Haaretz with "Open Sans Hebrew","Helvetica Neue",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif

(Note: Edited the section below after some feedback from ranh.)

Some personal preferences for Hebrew (web) typography:

  • System serif fonts typically don't look good on the web, especially when combined with non-serif fonts. Matching serif/non serif requires some expertise.
  • Italic text shouldn't be used, unless the font includes a native slanted weight with the Hebrew characters. One alternative for quotes is to use a cursive (i.e handwritten) font, or a monospaced font.

yoavf commented Oct 13, 2016

I've just checked a few of my favorite Hebrew sites. Most good ones use web fonts. An exception would be newspaper site Haaretz with "Open Sans Hebrew","Helvetica Neue",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif

(Note: Edited the section below after some feedback from ranh.)

Some personal preferences for Hebrew (web) typography:

  • System serif fonts typically don't look good on the web, especially when combined with non-serif fonts. Matching serif/non serif requires some expertise.
  • Italic text shouldn't be used, unless the font includes a native slanted weight with the Hebrew characters. One alternative for quotes is to use a cursive (i.e handwritten) font, or a monospaced font.
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melchoyce Oct 13, 2016

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Unfortunately, Open Sans is a web font. :/

Of these three options, is one better looking and more legible than the other?

https://cloudup.com/cuLKAB2FjXl

Thanks @yoavf (and ranh)!

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melchoyce commented Oct 13, 2016

Unfortunately, Open Sans is a web font. :/

Of these three options, is one better looking and more legible than the other?

https://cloudup.com/cuLKAB2FjXl

Thanks @yoavf (and ranh)!

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ranh Oct 13, 2016

There are some artifacts at the top here, but otherwise Arial Hebrew is the best of the three: https://cloudup.com/iULLfSZpZPt

Here Helvetica is requested but since it doesn't have Hebrew characters, Arial is used for those chars as a fallback. However some chars are available in Helvetica, like double quotes, so Helvetica is still used for those. So mostly it's the same excpet for a few bad chars (and not having the artifacts at the top): https://cloudup.com/iaAoOKKjzeS

Incidentally, this is not the behavior I would expect for OS X, it should be Lucida Grande as the fallback Hebrew font. But maybe it varies between browsers and locale settings. Arial is probably the fallback under Windows.

Tahoma is not commonly used in Hebrew: https://cloudup.com/iAVuX9tgBJu

AFAIK, Arial is the only "safe" font for Hebrew.

Also AFAIK, it should be specified as "Arial Hebrew", Arial, to work correctly across macos and Windows.

ranh commented Oct 13, 2016

There are some artifacts at the top here, but otherwise Arial Hebrew is the best of the three: https://cloudup.com/iULLfSZpZPt

Here Helvetica is requested but since it doesn't have Hebrew characters, Arial is used for those chars as a fallback. However some chars are available in Helvetica, like double quotes, so Helvetica is still used for those. So mostly it's the same excpet for a few bad chars (and not having the artifacts at the top): https://cloudup.com/iaAoOKKjzeS

Incidentally, this is not the behavior I would expect for OS X, it should be Lucida Grande as the fallback Hebrew font. But maybe it varies between browsers and locale settings. Arial is probably the fallback under Windows.

Tahoma is not commonly used in Hebrew: https://cloudup.com/iAVuX9tgBJu

AFAIK, Arial is the only "safe" font for Hebrew.

Also AFAIK, it should be specified as "Arial Hebrew", Arial, to work correctly across macos and Windows.

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Thank you @ranh! That's super helpful.

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melchoyce commented Oct 13, 2016

Thank you @ranh! That's super helpful.

laurelfulford added a commit to laurelfulford/twentyseventeen that referenced this issue Oct 15, 2016

laurelfulford added a commit to laurelfulford/twentyseventeen that referenced this issue Oct 15, 2016

davidakennedy added a commit that referenced this issue Oct 15, 2016

Merge pull request #355 from melchoyce/update/languages
Tidy up and reorder languages alphabetically.

See #59.
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re: Vietnamese, Libre Franklin introduced support in impallari/Libre-Franklin@b57e464. I pinged the font designer on Twitter to ask if that support would be rolled out to Google Fonts, and he said yes, soon.

So, what I'm wondering is — should we adjust the font-stack now and then un-adjust it later when the Google Fonts version updates, or should we leave it?

Here's what it looks with the current Google version of the font:

screen shot 2016-10-16 at 2 37 53 pm

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melchoyce commented Oct 16, 2016

re: Vietnamese, Libre Franklin introduced support in impallari/Libre-Franklin@b57e464. I pinged the font designer on Twitter to ask if that support would be rolled out to Google Fonts, and he said yes, soon.

So, what I'm wondering is — should we adjust the font-stack now and then un-adjust it later when the Google Fonts version updates, or should we leave it?

Here's what it looks with the current Google version of the font:

screen shot 2016-10-16 at 2 37 53 pm

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davidakennedy Oct 17, 2016

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@melchoyce Re: Vietnamese – any alternatives? Time is running out. 😞

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davidakennedy commented Oct 17, 2016

@melchoyce Re: Vietnamese – any alternatives? Time is running out. 😞

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melchoyce Oct 17, 2016

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@davidakennedy What are your opinions on the options I laid out?

  1. Leave it and wait for the eventual Google Fonts update
  2. Create an alternative font-stack, and then delete it when Google Fonts is updated (if we notice 😕)
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melchoyce commented Oct 17, 2016

@davidakennedy What are your opinions on the options I laid out?

  1. Leave it and wait for the eventual Google Fonts update
  2. Create an alternative font-stack, and then delete it when Google Fonts is updated (if we notice 😕)
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Chatted with @davidakennedy and decided to leave Vietnamese, pending the font update on Google Fonts. It'll be a much more tailored experience, and we won't have to worry about redoing anything afterwards. With that, I think we can close out this issue. If anyone thinks we should support additional languages, please make a new issue. :)

Thanks for everyone's help and input here! Please keep testing in other languages.

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melchoyce commented Oct 17, 2016

Chatted with @davidakennedy and decided to leave Vietnamese, pending the font update on Google Fonts. It'll be a much more tailored experience, and we won't have to worry about redoing anything afterwards. With that, I think we can close out this issue. If anyone thinks we should support additional languages, please make a new issue. :)

Thanks for everyone's help and input here! Please keep testing in other languages.

@melchoyce melchoyce closed this Oct 17, 2016

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mayukojpn Oct 21, 2016

Hi! I talked with @KienTrong from @FameThemes, one of vietnamese theme distributor and he would like to help this issue. Can we make a ticket on trac? Or is it too late?

mayukojpn commented Oct 21, 2016

Hi! I talked with @KienTrong from @FameThemes, one of vietnamese theme distributor and he would like to help this issue. Can we make a ticket on trac? Or is it too late?

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Can definitely make a trac ticket! Be sure to put it in the "Bundled Themes" with "4.7" as the milestone.

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melchoyce commented Oct 21, 2016

Can definitely make a trac ticket! Be sure to put it in the "Bundled Themes" with "4.7" as the milestone.

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impallari Nov 15, 2016

Hi Guys, sorry to arrive late to the party.
Some good news: Libre Franklin v1.015 was just released. It fixes a small bug in the italic double-quotes, adds support and coverage to lots of languages (including Vietnamese), and the kerning was greatly improved. I'm very happy that you are using it for this awesome new theme. Thanks!
I will ping the guys at googlefonts so they can make it public asap.
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impallari commented Nov 15, 2016

Hi Guys, sorry to arrive late to the party.
Some good news: Libre Franklin v1.015 was just released. It fixes a small bug in the italic double-quotes, adds support and coverage to lots of languages (including Vietnamese), and the kerning was greatly improved. I'm very happy that you are using it for this awesome new theme. Thanks!
I will ping the guys at googlefonts so they can make it public asap.
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Thank you so much @impallari! Super excited to use Libre Franklin :)

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melchoyce commented Nov 16, 2016

Thank you so much @impallari! Super excited to use Libre Franklin :)

@naokomc naokomc referenced this issue Sep 14, 2018

Open

Better support for localized fonts #9891

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