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Fix typos

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jwilk authored and YorickPeterse committed Mar 3, 2017
1 parent 4f832a8 commit 87842ae295c2283d8e02d951781189486a7cc970
Showing with 3 additions and 3 deletions.
  1. +2 −2 doc/code_analysis.md
  2. +1 −1 doc/configuration.md
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@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ The full code of this exercise looks like the following:
## Conditional Analysis
In some cases you want to use a certain analysis class but only enable it if a
-certain condition is met. In order to do so a analysis class should define a
+certain condition is met. In order to do so, an analysis class should define a
class method called `analyze?` that returns a boolean that indicates if the
class should be used or not. The basic signature of this method can be seen at
{RubyLint::Analysis::Base.analyze?}.
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ By default all analysis classes are enabled.
## Registering Analysis Classes
-In order for a analysis class to become available in {RubyLint::Configuration}
+In order for an analysis class to become available in {RubyLint::Configuration}
objects, either via the CLI or via Ruby directly, you must register the
analysis class. This can be done by calling the class method
{RubyLint::Analysis::Base.register}:
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@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
# Configuration
The default configuration of ruby-lint should be suitable for most people.
-However, depending on your code base you may get an usual amount of false
+However, depending on your code base you may get an unusual amount of false
positives. In particular the class {RubyLint::Analysis::UndefinedMethods} can
produce a lot of false positives.

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