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Minor various tweaks to markup; partial conversion to smart quotes

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1 parent a5e1c47 commit a4ec70fd7215ad5245aaf2956d93f2eab93d0b73 Zearin committed Jul 12, 2013
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
<article
xmlns="http://docbook.org/ns/docbook"
xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"
- xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"
+ xmlns:xl="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"
version="5.0">
<title>About</title>
@@ -15,28 +15,28 @@
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
- <para>Comments about the website: webmaster@xmlpatterns.com</para>
+ <para>Comments about the website: <link xl:href="mailto:webmaster@xmlpatterns.com">webmaster@xmlpatterns.com</link></para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para>Comments about the patterns: patterns@xmlpatterns.com</para>
+ <para>Comments about the patterns: <link xl:href="mailto:patterns@xmlpatterns.com">patterns@xmlpatterns.com</link></para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para>General comments and inquiries, advertising information: info@xmlpatterns.com</para>
+ <para>General comments and inquiries, advertising information: <link xl:href="mailto:info@xmlpatterns.com">info@xmlpatterns.com</link></para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</section>
<section>
<title>What They Are Saying About Us</title>
- <para>"A very interesting approach to designing/developing XML documents. I would say that it is a must-read for any serious XML developer, not to mention a very interesting concept!!!!!" (XMLPitstop)</para>
- <para>"XMLPatterns has really helped me get a handle on the conceptual structure of data" Derrick Bell (Secrets of the XML developer elite)</para>
- <para>"I recently came across an oustanding reference site on design patterns for creating good XML. The site is XMLPatterns.com. The content has already been very helpful to me and I recommend this as a useful reference link." (CSharpener's Weblog)</para>
+ <para>A very interesting approach to designing/developing XML documents. I would say that it is a must-read for any serious XML developer, not to mention a very interesting concept!!!!! (XMLPitstop)</para>
+ <para>XMLPatterns has really helped me get a handle on the conceptual structure of data Derrick Bell (Secrets of the XML developer elite)</para>
+ <para>I recently came across an oustanding reference site on design patterns for creating good XML. The site is <uri xl:href="http://xmlpatterns.com">XMLPatterns.com</uri>. The content has already been very helpful to me and I recommend this as a useful reference link. (CSharpeners Weblog)</para>
</section>
<section>
<title>Privacy Statement</title>
<para>Our basic privacy policy is simple. We will not rent, sell, or share personal information that we collect about you.</para>
- <para>At XMLPatterns.com, we recognize that privacy of your personal information is important. Here is information on what types of personal information we receive and collect when you use and visit XMLPatterns.com, and how we safeguard your information. We never sell your personal information to third parties.</para>
+ <para>At <uri xl:href="http://xmlpatterns.com">XMLPatterns.com</uri>, we recognize that privacy of your personal information is important. Here is information on what types of personal information we receive and collect when you use and visit <uri xl:href="http://xmlpatterns.com">XMLPatterns.com</uri>, and how we safeguard your information. We never sell your personal information to third parties.</para>
</section>
<section>
<title>Log Files</title>
@@ -45,12 +45,12 @@
<section>
<title>Cookies and Web Beacons</title>
<para>We do use cookies to store information, such as your personal preferences when you visit our site. This could include only showing you a popup once in your visit, or the ability to login to some of our features, such as forums.</para>
- <para>We also use third party advertisements on XMLPatterns.com to support our site. Some of these advertisers may use technology such as cookies and web beacons when they advertise on our site, which will also send these advertisers (such as Google through the Google AdSense program) information including your IP address, your ISP , the browser you used to visit our site, and in some cases, whether you have Flash installed. This is generally used for geotargeting purposes (showing New York real estate ads to someone in New York, for example) or showing certain ads based on specific sites visited (such as showing cooking ads to someone who frequents cooking sites).</para>
+ <para>We also use third party advertisements on <uri xl:href="http://xmlpatterns.com">XMLPatterns.com</uri> to support our site. Some of these advertisers may use technology such as cookies and web beacons when they advertise on our site, which will also send these advertisers (such as Google through the Google AdSense program) information including your IP address, your ISP , the browser you used to visit our site, and in some cases, whether you have Flash installed. This is generally used for geotargeting purposes (showing New York real estate ads to someone in New York, for example) or showing certain ads based on specific sites visited (such as showing cooking ads to someone who frequents cooking sites).</para>
</section>
<section>
<title>DoubleClick DART cookies</title>
- <para>We also may use DART cookies for ad serving through Google's DoubleClick, which places a cookie on your computer when you are browsing the web and visit a site using DoubleClick advertising (including some Google AdSense advertisements). This cookie is used to serve ads specific to you and your interests (“interest based targeting”). The ads served will be targeted based on your previous browsing history (For example, if you have been viewing sites about visiting Las Vegas, you may see Las Vegas hotel advertisements when viewing a non-related site, such as on a site about hockey). DART uses "non personally identifiable information". It does NOT track personal information about you, such as your name, email address, physical address, telephone number, social security numbers, bank account numbers or credit card numbers. You can opt-out of this ad serving on all sites using this advertising by visiting <link xlink:href="http://www.doubleclick.com/privacy/dart_adserving.aspx">http://www.doubleclick.com/privacy/dart_adserving.aspx</link>.</para>
+ <para>We also may use DART cookies for ad serving through Google’s DoubleClick, which places a cookie on your computer when you are browsing the web and visit a site using DoubleClick advertising (including some Google AdSense advertisements). This cookie is used to serve ads specific to you and your interests (“interest based targeting”). The ads served will be targeted based on your previous browsing history (For example, if you have been viewing sites about visiting Las Vegas, you may see Las Vegas hotel advertisements when viewing a non-related site, such as on a site about hockey). DART uses "non personally identifiable information". It does NOT track personal information about you, such as your name, email address, physical address, telephone number, social security numbers, bank account numbers or credit card numbers. You can opt-out of this ad serving on all sites using this advertising by visiting <link xl:href="http://www.doubleclick.com/privacy/dart_adserving.aspx">http://www.doubleclick.com/privacy/dart_adserving.aspx</link>.</para>
<para>You can chose to disable or selectively turn off our cookies or third-party cookies in your browser settings, or by managing preferences in programs such as Norton Internet Security. However, this can affect how you are able to interact with our site as well as other websites. This could include the inability to login to services or programs, such as logging into forums or accounts.</para>
<para>Deleting cookies does not mean you are permanently opted out of any advertising program. Unless you have settings that disallow cookies, the next time you visit a site running the advertisements, a new cookie will be added.</para>
<para>We have relationships with other companies that we allow to place ads on our Web pages. As a result of your visit to our site, ad server companies may collect information such as your domain type, your IP address and clickstream information and may be placing and reading cookies on your browser. If you wish to disable cookies, you may do so through your browser options.</para>
@@ -22,16 +22,18 @@
<para>A pattern language brings together a number of these patterns in one particular field. It is an attempt to reproduce all of the knowledge needed to create quality items in that field. A pattern language for buildings gives one the power to create building which people will want to live in, a pattern language for software design gives the power to create software which is usable and maintainable. Just as spoken language give people the ability to create an infinite variety of sentences, pattern languages give people the power to create an infinite variety of document types. We just need to create a common vocabulary so we can make useful sentences.</para>
<para>This site is an attempt to start to produce an XML Structural Pattern language. This pattern language gives one the power to create document types for XML, which describe documents that are useful, maintainable, easy to author, and easy to process. This pattern language will be most useful if it is shared across the whole XML community. Because of this, your feedback into this process is very important.</para>
</article>
- <article>
+
+ <article>
<title>History</title>
- <para>The concept of patterns was originated by Christopher Alexander. Alexander was an architect. He used patterns to design building and towns. His patterns deal with subjects such as entry ways, gardens and roadways. In the late 1980s people started applying his concept to object oriented software design. The first to do so were Ward Cunningham and Kent Beck, who in 1987 wrote a paper entitled "<link xl:href="http://c2.com/doc/oopsla87.html">Using Pattern Languages for Object-Oriented Programs</link>", which described five patterns that discussed problems in designing Smalltalk windows.</para>
- <para>The object oriented community quickly recognized the power of patterns and started writing patterns that appeared in articles, workshops and books. The breakthrough work was the "<link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0201633612">Design Patterns</link>" book, which brought wide scale acceptance of patterns to the object-oriented world. Work has also been done in the areas of analysis patterns, process patterns, and organizational patterns. This site is an attempt to apply the concept of patterns to XML Structural Design.</para>
+ <para>The concept of patterns was originated by Christopher Alexander. Alexander was an architect. He used patterns to design building and towns. His patterns deal with subjects such as entry ways, gardens and roadways. In the late 1980s people started applying his concept to object oriented software design. The first to do so were Ward Cunningham and Kent Beck, who in 1987 wrote a paper entitled “<link xl:href="http://c2.com/doc/oopsla87.html">Using Pattern Languages for Object-Oriented Programs</link>”, which described five patterns that discussed problems in designing Smalltalk windows.</para>
+ <para>The object oriented community quickly recognized the power of patterns and started writing patterns that appeared in articles, workshops and books. The breakthrough work was the “<link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0201633612">Design Patterns</link>” book, which brought wide scale acceptance of patterns to the object-oriented world. Work has also been done in the areas of analysis patterns, process patterns, and organizational patterns. This site is an attempt to apply the concept of patterns to XML Structural Design.</para>
</article>
- <article>
+
+ <article>
<title>Pattern Forms</title>
- <para>There are many different ways to write patterns. Different authors have different way of organizing the ideas presented. Alexander's original patterns were presented in a fairly informal, narrative style. The patterns presented in "<link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0201633612">Design Patterns</link>" book were much more fine grained, decomposing each pattern into many sections. The structure used depends on several factors. Each author has his or own preferences. Different subject matters may influence the structure. For example more technical subject areas can call for patterns with more structure. Different audiences may call for different structures as well, novice readers may prefer a more prosy style, while more experienced readers may prefer a more structured approach. The form chosen for this site is a middle of the road one, not as prosy as Alexander's patterns in <link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0195019199">A Pattern Language</link>, yet not as structured as "<link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0201633612">Design Patterns</link>" book either.</para>
+ <para>There are many different ways to write patterns. Different authors have different way of organizing the ideas presented. Alexander’s original patterns were presented in a fairly informal, narrative style. The patterns presented in “<link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0201633612">Design Patterns</link>” book were much more fine grained, decomposing each pattern into many sections. The structure used depends on several factors. Each author has his or own preferences. Different subject matters may influence the structure. For example more technical subject areas can call for patterns with more structure. Different audiences may call for different structures as well, novice readers may prefer a more prosy style, while more experienced readers may prefer a more structured approach. The form chosen for this site is a middle of the road one, not as prosy as Alexander’s patterns in <link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0195019199">A Pattern Language</link>, yet not as structured as “<link xl:href="books/books.part.xml#0201633612">Design Patterns</link>” book either.</para>
<para>What matters is that there is a consistent structure so patterns are easier to understand and compare.</para>
<para>Most people would agree that there must be at least five elements in every pattern: a name; a problem description; the context of the problem; the solution; and the rational for the solution. This web site uses the following sections for each pattern:</para>
@@ -107,7 +109,8 @@
</glossentry>
</glossary>
</article>
- <article>
+
+ <article>
<title>Good Design</title>
<para>The purpose of XML Structural Patterns are to help create document types that are designed well. The goal of a design can be thought of a balancing of forces. There are many competing forces that the designer of a document type must deal with simultaneously. In non-trivial problems, it is impossible for all of the forces to be eliminated completely, so compromises must be made.</para>
@@ -37,13 +37,13 @@
<varlistentry>
<term>Introduction to XML Design patterns</term>
<listitem>
- <para>Ian Graham and Liam Quin's site which contains 4 patterns, Running Text, Generated Text, Footnote, and Text Blocks.</para>
+ <para>Ian Graham and Liam Quins site which contains 4 patterns, Running Text, Generated Text, Footnote, and Text Blocks.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Architectural Design Patterns for XML Documents</term>
<listitem>
- <para>Kyle Downey's article attempts to document a few whole-document design patterns.</para>
+ <para>Kyle Downeys article attempts to document a few whole-document design patterns.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@
<para>Links to pages about patterns in area other than XML.</para>
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
- <term>TheServerSide.com's Pattern Collection</term>
+ <term>TheServerSide.coms Pattern Collection</term>
<listitem>
<para>A pattern repository focusing on patterns that can be used with Java middleware technologies. They are inviting site visitors to contribute patterns.</para>
</listitem>
@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@
<varlistentry>
<term>Patterns and Software: Essential Concepts and Terminology</term>
<listitem>
- <para>Brad Appleton's excellent page about patterns in the field of object-oriented software.</para>
+ <para>Brad Appletons excellent page about patterns in the field of object-oriented software.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@
<varlistentry>
<term>Elements vs. Attributes</term>
<listitem>
- <para>Robin Cover's page covering the element vs. attributes debate. When should you use an element? When should you use an attribute? Check this page for some good references.</para>
+ <para>Robin Covers page covering the element vs. attributes debate. When should you use an element? When should you use an attribute? Check this page for some good references.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
@@ -115,11 +115,11 @@
<varlistentry>
<term>The XML Catalog</term>
<listitem>
- <para>Oasis' catalog of XML specifications.</para>
+ <para>Oasis catalog of XML specifications.</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
- <term>Robin Cover's Listing of XML Applications</term>
+ <term>Robin Covers Listing of XML Applications</term>
<listitem>
<para>A comprehensive listing of XML applications and announced industry initiatives.</para>
</listitem>
@@ -113,8 +113,6 @@
]]></programlisting>
</example>
-
-
<para>In this example the Collection Element was needed to establish a context for the
exchange data. Without a collection element, this information would have to be
duplicated in every Stock element.</para>
@@ -140,7 +138,7 @@
<section>
<title>Known Uses</title>
- <para>The DocBook DTD has a <tag>OrderedList</tag> Element, whose only sub-children can be
- one or more ListItem elements.</para>
+ <para>The DocBook DTD has a <tag class="element">OrderedList</tag> Element, whose only sub-children can be
+ one or more <tag class="element">ListItem</tag> elements.</para>
</section>
</section>
@@ -55,9 +55,9 @@
]]></programlisting>
- <para>The above document describes a computer&apos;s configuration. If however processing
+ <para>The above document describes a computers configuration. If however processing
software was only interested in the hardware aspects of the configuration it would need
- to check all of the elements and extract the RAM and HardDriveSize elements. Compare
+ to check all of the elements and extract the RAM and <tag class="element">HardDriveSize</tag> elements. Compare
this to the following:</para>
<programlisting language="xml"><![CDATA[
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@
to each type.</para>
<para>The <link xl:href="/patterns/metadata/head-body.xml">Head-Body pattern</link> uses two specific types of Container Elements, one for metadata
and one for content.</para>
- <para>The Collection Element is a container for single type of element.</para>
+ <para>The <tag class="element">Collection</tag> Element is a container for single type of element.</para>
</section>
<section>
@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@
<title>Known Uses</title>
<para>All document types are full of Domain Elements.</para>
- <para>XHTML is used for markup of documents to be displayed so it contains elements for
+ <para><acronym>XHTML</acronym> is used for markup of documents to be displayed so it contains elements for
things such as titles, headings, and paragraphs.</para>
<para>The Information and Content Exchange (ICE) Protocol is used for distributing web
content, so it contains elements such as sender, receiver, request and response.</para>
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