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Reverted reference to klogind. Minor reformating.

git-svn-id: svn://anonsvn.mit.edu/krb5/trunk@25652 dc483132-0cff-0310-8789-dd5450dbe970
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commit eb516d1d59f77e47ada0bae858917988f7914deb 1 parent 5c5a979
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82 doc/rst_source/krb_admins/install_kdc/slave_install.rst
@@ -1,20 +1,19 @@
.. _slave_host_key_label:
-
-
Setting up slave KDCs
========================================
Prep work on the master side.
-------------------------------------------
-Each KDC needs a *host* keys in the Kerberos database.
-These keys are used for mutual authentication when propagating the database *dump* file
-from the master KDC to the secondary KDC servers.
+Each KDC needs a *host* keys in the Kerberos database.
+These keys are used for mutual authentication when propagating the database
+*dump* file from the master KDC to the secondary KDC servers.
-On the master KDC connect to administrative interface and create the new principals for each of the KDCs *host* service.
-For example, if the master KDC were called *kerberos.mit.edu*, and you had slave KDC named *kerberos-1.mit.edu*,
-you would type the following::
+On the master KDC connect to administrative interface and create
+the new principals for each of the KDCs *host* service.
+For example, if the master KDC were called *kerberos.mit.edu*, and you had
+slave KDC named *kerberos-1.mit.edu*, you would type the following::
shell% /usr/local/bin/kadmin
kadmin: addprinc -randkey host/kerberos.mit.edu
@@ -26,14 +25,16 @@ you would type the following::
Principal "host/kerberos-1.mit.edu@ATHENA.MIT.EDU" created.
-It is not actually necessary to have the master KDC server in the Kerberos database, but it can be handy if:
+It is not actually necessary to have the master KDC server in the Kerberos
+database, but it can be handy if:
- anyone will be logging into the machine as something other than *root*
- - you want to be able to swap the master KDC with one of the slaves if necessary.
+ - you want to be able to swap the master KDC with one of the slaves if necessary.
-Next, extract *host* random keys for all participating KDCs and store them in the default keytab file
-which is needed to decrypt tickets. Ideally, you should extract each keytab locally on its own KDC.
-If this is not feasible, you should use an encrypted session to send them across the network.
+Next, extract *host* random keys for all participating KDCs and store them
+in the default keytab file which is needed to decrypt tickets.
+Ideally, you should extract each keytab locally on its own KDC.
+If this is not feasible, you should use an encrypted session to send them across the network.
To extract a keytab on a KDC called *kerberos.mit.edu*, you would execute the following command::
kadmin: ktadd host/kerberos.mit.edu
@@ -46,30 +47,34 @@ To extract a keytab on a KDC called *kerberos.mit.edu*, you would execute the fo
kadmin:
-Move the file /tmp/krb5.keytab (via scp) onto the slave KDC (*kerberos-1.mit.edu*)
-into exactly the same location as on the master (default is */etc/krb5.keytab*).
-Remove the temporary copy /tmp/krb5.keytab from the master.
+Move the file /tmp/krb5.keytab (via scp) onto the slave KDC (*kerberos-1.mit.edu*)
+into exactly the same location as on the master (default is */etc/krb5.keytab*).
+Remove the temporary copy /tmp/krb5.keytab from the master.
Configuring the slave
-------------------------
-By default, the propagation is done on the entire content of the master's database.
-That is, even special principals (like *K/M\@FOOBAR.COM*) will be dumped and copied to the slave KDCs.
-Pay attention there: it means that configuration files, as also specific files
+By default, the propagation is done on the entire content of the master's database.
+That is, even special principals (like *K/M\@FOOBAR.COM*) will be dumped and
+copied to the slave KDCs.
+Pay attention there: it means that configuration files, as also specific files
(like ACLs and :ref:`stash_definition`) must be copied to the slave hosts too.
-Copying only a part of it will result in a bulky situation. If you forget to copy the stash file for example,
-the KDC daemon on the slave host will not be able to access the propagated database because of missing master key.
-Before connecting to the slave, you will copy all minimum required files from the master for the slave system to work.
-Initially, it concerns ( See :ref:`mitK5defaults` for the recommended default locations for these files):
+Copying only a part of it will result in a bulky situation.
+If you forget to copy the stash file for example,
+the KDC daemon on the slave host will not be able to access the propagated
+database because of missing master key.
+Before connecting to the slave, you will copy all minimum required files
+from the master for the slave system to work. Initially, it concerns
+(See :ref:`mitK5defaults` for the recommended default locations for these files):
• krb5.conf
• kdc.conf
• kadm5.acl
• master key stash file
-Connect to the slave, *kerberos-1.mit.edu*. Move the copied files into their appropriate directories
-(exactly like on the master KDC).
+Connect to the slave, *kerberos-1.mit.edu*. Move the copied files into their
+appropriate directories (exactly like on the master KDC).
You will now initialize the slave database::
@@ -78,14 +83,17 @@ You will now initialize the slave database::
.. caution:: You will use :ref:`kdb5_util(8)` but without exporting the stash file (-s argument), i
thus avoiding the obliteration of the one you just copied from the master.
-When asking for the database Master Password, type in anything you want.
+When asking for the database Master Password, type in anything you want.
The whole dummy database will be erased upon the first propagation from master.
-The database is propagated from the master KDC to the slave KDCs via the :ref:`kpropd(8)` daemon.
-You must explicitly specify the clients that are allowed to provide Kerberos dump updates on the slave machine with a new database.
+The database is propagated from the master KDC to the slave KDCs via
+the :ref:`kpropd(8)` daemon.
+You must explicitly specify the clients that are allowed to provide Kerberos
+dump updates on the slave machine with a new database.
The *kpropd.acl* file serves as the access control list for the *kpropd* service.
-This file is typically resides in *krb5kdc* local directory.
-Since in our case the updates should only come from *kerberos.mit.edu* server, then the file's contents would be::
+This file is typically resides in *krb5kdc* local directory.
+Since in our case the updates should only come from *kerberos.mit.edu* server,
+then the file's contents would be::
host/kerberos.mit.edu@ATHENA.MIT.EDU
@@ -94,11 +102,14 @@ Since in our case the updates should only come from *kerberos.mit.edu* server,
*kpropd.acl* files on *all* of these servers.
-Then, add the following line to */etc/inetd.conf* file on each KDC (Adjust the path to *kpropd*)::
+Then, add the following line to */etc/inetd.conf* file on each KDC
+(Adjust the path to *kpropd*)::
krb5_prop stream tcp nowait root /usr/local/sbin/kpropd kpropd
+ eklogin stream tcp nowait root /usr/local/sbin/klogind klogind -5 -c -e
-You also need to add the following lines to */etc/services* on each KDC (assuming that default ports are used)::
+You also need to add the following lines to */etc/services* on each KDC
+(assuming that default ports are used)::
kerberos 88/udp kdc # Kerberos authentication (udp)
kerberos 88/tcp kdc # Kerberos authentication (tcp)
@@ -116,17 +127,14 @@ if the default locations must be overridden,::
waiting for a kprop connection
-Now that the slave KDC is able to accept database propagation, you’ll need to propagate the database from the master server.
+Now that the slave KDC is able to accept database propagation,
+you’ll need to propagate the database from the master server.
NOTE: Do not start slave KDC - you still do not have a copy of the master's database.
-
------------
Feedback:
Please, provide your feedback or suggest a new topic at krb5-bugs@mit.edu?subject=Documentation___install_kdc
-
-
-
View
10 doc/rst_source/krb_users/user_commands/k5identity.rst
@@ -4,19 +4,19 @@
DESCRIPTION
-------------
-The *.k5identity* file, which resides in a user's home directory,
-contains a list of rules for selecting a client principals based on
-the server being accessed. These rules are used to choose a credential
+The *.k5identity* file, which resides in a user's home directory,
+contains a list of rules for selecting a client principals based on
+the server being accessed. These rules are used to choose a credential
cache within the cache collection when possible.
Blank lines and lines beginning with '#' are ignored. Each line has the form:
principal field=value ...
-If the server principal meets all of the field constraints, then principal
+If the server principal meets all of the field constraints, then principal
is chosen as the client principal. The following fields are recognized:
-**realm**
+**realm**
If the realm of the server principal is known, it is matched
against *value*, which may be a pattern using shell wildcards.
For host-based server principals, the realm will generally only
View
22 doc/rst_source/krb_users/user_commands/k5login.rst
@@ -4,11 +4,11 @@
DESCRIPTION
--------------
-The *.k5login* file, which resides in a user's home directory,
+The *.k5login* file, which resides in a user's home directory,
contains a list of the Kerberos principals.
-Anyone with valid tickets for a principal in the file is allowed host access
-with the UID of the user in whose home directory the file resides.
-One common use is to place a *.k5login* file in root's home directory,
+Anyone with valid tickets for a principal in the file is allowed host access
+with the UID of the user in whose home directory the file resides.
+One common use is to place a *.k5login* file in root's home directory,
thereby granting system administrators remote root access to the host via Kerberos.
EXAMPLES
@@ -18,8 +18,8 @@ Suppose the user *alice* had a *.k5login* file in her home directory containing
bob\@FOOBAR.ORG
-This would allow *bob* to use any of the Kerberos network applications,
-such as telnet(1), rlogin(1), rsh(1), and rcp(1),
+This would allow *bob* to use any of the Kerberos network applications,
+such as telnet(1), rlogin(1), rsh(1), and rcp(1),
to access *alice*'s account, using *bob*'s Kerberos tickets.
Let us further suppose that *alice* is a system administrator.
@@ -31,14 +31,14 @@ in root's *.k5login* file on each host:
joeadmin/root\@BLEEP.COM
This would allow either system administrator to log in to these hosts
-using their Kerberos tickets instead of having to type the root password.
-Note that because *bob* retains the Kerberos tickets for his own principal,
-"bob\@FOOBAR.ORG", he would not have any of the privileges that require *alice*'s tickets,
-such as root access to any of the site's hosts,
+using their Kerberos tickets instead of having to type the root password.
+Note that because *bob* retains the Kerberos tickets for his own principal,
+"bob\@FOOBAR.ORG", he would not have any of the privileges that require *alice*'s tickets,
+such as root access to any of the site's hosts,
or the ability to change *alice*'s password.
SEE ALSO
-----------
-telnet(1), rlogin(1), rsh(1), rcp(1), ksu(1), telnetd(8)
+telnet(1), rlogin(1), rsh(1), rcp(1), ksu(1), telnetd(8), klogind(8)
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