Idiomatic asyncio utilties
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
docs
examples
src/aiotools
tests
.editorconfig
.gitignore
.readthedocs.yml
.travis.yml
CHANGES.md
CONTRIBUTORS.txt
LICENSE
README.md
requirements-ci.txt
requirements-dev.txt
requirements-docs.txt
requirements.txt
setup.cfg
setup.py

README.md

aiotools

PyPI release version Supported Python versions Build Status Code Coverage

Idiomatic asyncio utilties

NOTE: This project is under early stage of developement. The public APIs may break version by version.

Modules

Examples

Async Context Manager

This is an asynchronous version of contextlib.contextmanager to make it easier to write asynchronous context managers without creating boilerplate classes.

import asyncio
import aiotools

@aiotools.actxmgr
async def mygen(a):
   await asyncio.sleep(1)
   yield a + 1
   await asyncio.sleep(1)

async def somewhere():
   async with mygen(1) as b:
       assert b == 2

Note that you need to wrap yield with a try-finally block to ensure resource releases (e.g., locks), even in the case when an exception is ocurred inside the async-with block.

import asyncio
import aiotools

lock = asyncio.Lock()

@aiotools.actxmgr
async def mygen(a):
   await lock.acquire()
   try:
       yield a + 1
   finally:
       lock.release()

async def somewhere():
   try:
       async with mygen(1) as b:
           raise RuntimeError('oops')
   except RuntimeError:
       print('caught!')  # you can catch exceptions here.

You can also create a group of async context managers, which are entered/exited all at once using asyncio.gather().

import asyncio
import aiotools

@aiotools.actxmgr
async def mygen(a):
   yield a + 10

async def somewhere():
   ctxgrp = aiotools.actxgroup(mygen(i) for i in range(10))
   async with ctxgrp as values:
       assert len(values) == 10
       for i in range(10):
           assert values[i] == i + 10

Async Server

This implements a common pattern to launch asyncio-based server daemons.

import asyncio
import aiotools

async def echo(reader, writer):
   data = await reader.read(100)
   writer.write(data)
   await writer.drain()
   writer.close()

@aiotools.server
async def myworker(loop, pidx, args):
   server = await asyncio.start_server(echo, '0.0.0.0', 8888,
       reuse_port=True, loop=loop)
   print(f'[{pidx}] started')
   yield  # wait until terminated
   server.close()
   await server.wait_closed()
   print(f'[{pidx}] terminated')

if __name__ == '__main__':
   # Run the above server using 4 worker processes.
   aiotools.start_server(myworker, num_workers=4)

It handles SIGINT/SIGTERM signals automatically to stop the server, as well as lifecycle management of event loops running on multiple processes.

Async Timer

import aiotools

i = 0

async def mytick(interval):
   print(i)
   i += 1

async def somewhere():
   t = aiotools.create_timer(mytick, 1.0)
   ...
   t.cancel()
   await t

t is an asyncio.Task object. To stop the timer, call t.cancel(); await t. Please don't forget await-ing t because it requires extra steps to cancel and await all pending tasks. To make your timer function to be cancellable, add a try-except clause catching asyncio.CancelledError since we use it as a termination signal.

You may add TimerDelayPolicy argument to control the behavior when the timer-fired task takes longer than the timer interval. DEFAULT is to accumulate them and cancel all the remainings at once when the timer is cancelled. CANCEL is to cancel any pending previously fired tasks on every interval.

import asyncio
import aiotools

async def mytick(interval):
   await asyncio.sleep(100)  # cancelled on every next interval.

async def somewhere():
   t = aiotools.create_timer(mytick, 1.0, aiotools.TimerDelayPolicy.CANCEL)
   ...
   t.cancel()
   await t