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peseta glyph #117

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srl295 opened this Issue Dec 23, 2015 · 12 comments

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@srl295

srl295 commented Dec 23, 2015

  • U+20A7, in SourceCodePro shows as "P" overstruck with "—" in SourceCodePro. It looks similar to U+20B1, "₱" but with one dash instead of two.
  • apparently, this was a glyph variation going back to Unicode 1.0.0
  • But as in L2-00/013 the charts reflect "Change glyph shape of U-20A7 PESETA SIGN to “Pts” - noted in minutes L2-00/005
  • current charts as for 8.0 refolect the "Pts" shape.
  • Note, this symbol is for the obsolete currency ESP

Also, SCP isn't alone in this usage. Other fonts on my mac have the "old" shape instead of the "Pts".

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pauldhunt commented Jan 6, 2016

@srl295 so for an obsolete currency sign, is it ok to use an obsolete glyph design?

@pauldhunt pauldhunt added the question label Jan 6, 2016

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frankrolf commented Jan 6, 2016

The struck P-symbol ist often preferred since it allows currency symbols to have the same width as the tabular figures (which is common practice). Much more difficult to do that with a combination of letters like Pts.

@fitojb

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fitojb commented Jan 6, 2016

Oh! That would explain why the Roboto font has Pt instead of Pts as the symbol for this currency, so that the symbol can be narrow…

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codeman38 commented Jan 6, 2016

Incidentally, this is equivalent to character 0x9E in MS-DOS code page 437, for which most video cards and printers went with the Pt rendering--though this was likely due to the limited resolution. (I vaguely recall having seen one or two printer fonts, and possibly a screen font, that went with Pts instead, but maybe my memory is playing tricks on me?)

@pauldhunt pauldhunt closed this Jan 8, 2016

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srl295 commented Jan 8, 2016

@pauldhunt well, the codepoint isn't obsolete, just the currency. I hit this because we have CLDR data which contains this point.

@frankrolf yes but there's for that - U+20B1. That was added 16 years ago now.

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pauldhunt commented Jan 9, 2016

@srl295 so is there a proposal for this issue? or is it just an FYI? (i never implied that the codepoint was obsolete, just that the currency and the current glyph form in Source Sans were).

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srl295 commented Jan 9, 2016

@pauldhunt sure, I would propose that the glyph is changed to Pts reflecting current Unicode charts for U+20A7

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pauldhunt commented Jan 9, 2016

I’ll look into making the Pt version work in the next revision (but not Pts, that’s where I draw the line, or remove the line, or whatever).

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srl295 commented Jan 9, 2016

@pauldhunt different strokes for different folks… so to speak

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frankrolf commented Feb 29, 2016

I just came across this document:

[…] the Spanish Peseta has two possible forms. One is an uppercase 'P' with a horizontal bar traveling through the upper bowl of the 'P'. The second and most common design supplied in fonts is the 'Pts' form of a ligature made from the uppercase 'P' lowercase 't' and lowercase 's'.

https://www.microsoft.com/typography/developers/fdsspec/monetary.htm

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moyogo commented Feb 29, 2016

@frankrolf that page is from 1998. L2-00/013 is from 2000. Unicode was fixed, Microsoft should fix that page.

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frankrolf commented Mar 1, 2016

@moyogo Hah. Good eye.
At least it says “last updated 26 February 2001” ;-)

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