This MySQL daemon plugin provides a job queue to which SQL queries can be submitted. These will then be executed according to priority and number of already running queries.
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INSTALL
README
install_qqueue.sql
uninstall_qqueue.sql

README

MySQL Query Job Queue
---------------------
(C) 2012, 2013 Adrian M. Partl, eScience Group AIP Potsdam

This MySQL daemon plugin provides a job queue to which SQL queries can
be submitted. These will then be executed according to priority and 
number of already running queries. 

The main use of such a job queue is to manage queries that take long
times to run. This is especially needed for queries requiring full
table scans on large tables. It is possible to limit the concurrent
execution of such large queries and provide all the I/O throughput
to only a handfull of queries. 

Further the job queue provides the possibility to define maximum 
execution times after which a job will be killed by the daemon.

It is possible to define user groups and queues with different execution
priorities. Each query needs to be submitted to a queue and the jobs
priority is calculated according to the user group and queue. However
the queue itself does not provide any user management, this facillity
needs to be provided else where.

The main design goals have been to connect the queue to our Big Data
Webframework DAIQUIRI. If the queue might seem usefull to you in a
different context, just contact the authors. It should not be too hard
to make the queue fit for different use cases.

And please note that this plugin "injects" into the MySQL server code.
Any bug this plugin has, can bring down the whole server. YOU HAVE BEEN
WARNED, so don't blame us if you use this in a productive environment 
where harm can arrise...


To install
----------

1) Download the mysql source corresponding to your installed
   version. Building mysql from scratch is recommended.

   Note: ONLY MYSQL VERSION 5.5 AND ABOVE ARE CURRENTLY 
   	 SUPPORTED

2) edit CMakeList.txt accordingly to point to the directory 
   where mysql is installed.

3) edit CMakeList.txt accordingly to point to the directory
   of the mysql sources

4) edit CMakeList.txt accordingly, if you are using MariaDB

5) edit CMakeList.txt accordingly, if you want the queue to behave as follows:
      Default behaviour:     Whenever a job is killed/timed out in the queue, the queue
                             waits until the job has been successfully killed and starts
                             the next job afterwards.

                             In certain cases (especially with buggy storage engines or functions
                             that don't handle MySQL KILL properly), this will lock up the queue if
                             a MySQL thread cannot be killed. To prevent this, uncomment the approperiate
                             option in CMakeLists.txt

      Alternative behaviour: Whenever a job is killed/timed out in the queue, the queue starts
                             the next job as soon as the kill request has been issued to the MySQL thread.
                             The queue does not wait on the job to properly exit.

4) mkdir build
   cd build

5) cmake ..

6) make

7) make install

8) log into mysql server as root and execute the commands in 
   install_qqueue.sql

   This will setup the neccessary tables, install the plugin
   and create all the UDFs needed to administer the queue.

9) Create user groups using "select qqueue_addUsrGrp(name, priority)

10) Create queue using "select qqueue_addQueue(name, priority, timeout)

11) adjust global valiables 
    qqueue_numQueriesParallel and 
    qqueue_intervalSec
    to your liking...

    show variables like '%qqueue%';

12) DONE

GENERAL WARNING!
----------------

Up to now, jobs are always executed as ROOT users! No security
context change is performed.

--------------------------------------------------------------
|     IT IS THEREFORE YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE,      |
|     	   	    ALL JOBS ARE KOSCHER!!!!                     |
|                                                            |
|              DONT BLAME US, YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!          |
--------------------------------------------------------------

Usage UDF
---------

Please always administer the queue through the provided UDFs.
Direct manipulation of the system tables is possible, however
no consistency checks are then performed, no timestamps are
set and priorities are not calculated...

User Groups table:

The user table holds information about various user groups that
can be defined. Basically this alters the overall priority of a
job which is the product of the user group priority and the queue
priority. Higher number means higher priority...

mysql.qqueue_usrGrps

qqueue_addUsrGrp(string usrGrp_name, int usrGrp_priority)
qqueue_updateUsrGrp(int usrGrp_id, string usrGrp_name, int usrGrp_priority)
qqueue_flushUsrGrps()

(to delete, use SQL on system table and flush the groups)


Queues table:

The queues table allow the definition of various queues (like in
PBS/Torque). Queues have a priority and a timeout. If a query in
a given queue exceeds its timelimit, the query queue daemon will
kill the query! Time is given in seconds!

mysql.qqueue_queues

qqueue_addQueue(string queue_name, int queue_priority, int queue_timeout)
qqueue_updateQueue(int queue_id, string queue_name, int queue_priority,
                    int queue_timeout)
qqueue_flushQueues()

(to delete, use SQL on system table and flush the groups)


Pending Job table:

Table containing the submitted jobs that are still pending or running.
The userId is not used by the queue and can be used for reference in
a user management level. The paqu_flag (parallel query flag) informs
the query daemon, that the query should be run as is and no 

CREATE TABLE foo SELECT ....

is added to the provided query on the last SELECT statement. If paqu_flag
is 0, then the CREATE TABLE statement is added to the last SELECT 
statement in the query. Multi queries are supported and are run under one
MySQL connection/thread. Temporary tables and variables should be conserved.

delJob will delete the job if it is still pending and will kill the job
if it is already running.

mysql.qqueue_jobs

qqueue_addJob(int jobId, int userId, string usrGrpName, string queueName,
              string query, string result_db, string result_table,
              string comment, int paqu_flag, (optional) string actualQuery)
qqueue_delJob(int jobId)

Comment on certain options in qqueue_addJob:
 - jobId: You can set the jobId to a value of your choice (it is your responsibility
          that the jobId is unique), or set this to "NULL" for generation by the queue

 - paqu_flag: If you set the paqu_flag (mainly intendet for use with the paqu parallel
              query facility), the string given in query is not parsed and no "CREATE
              TABLE" statement is added. The query holds the original query. It is up to
              the user to provide a correctly "CREATE TABLE" escaped query in actualQuery.


History Job table:

After any job execution terminates due to whatever reason, the job is
moved to the qqueue_history table.

mysql.qqueue_history

Usage Stored Procedures
-----------------------

If you have fully run "install_qqueue.sql", two stored procedures have been
installed in the "mysql" database:

qqueue_clean_history():

By running "CALL qqueue_clean_history();" in the mysql database, you can set
all jobs in the history as DELETED, that have no corresponding result table
anymore. This should be run as root, that mysql has full access to the complete
information_schema.tables table.

qqueue_wipe_history():

By running "CALL qqueue_wipe_history();" in the mysql database, all jobs are deleted
that have no corresponding result table anymore. This should be run as root, that 
mysql has full access to the complete information_schema.tables table.