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Wormwhole is a streaming message queue system for Node.JS focused on performance.

branch: master

Merge branch 'benchmark'

* benchmark:
  updating benchmarks to work on .4.x too and just be cooler
  commiting broken benchmarks

Conflicts:
	examples/benchmark_recv.js
	examples/others/senddata.js
latest commit 8cf9cc7e0e
Daniel Ennis authored October 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 examples Merge branch 'benchmark' October 20, 2013
Octocat-spinner-32 lib v3.0.0: MAJOR UPDATE - New "Channels" Support. FD Send Support, Error… September 24, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 test Adding a missing test case for * events and multi event handlers. September 24, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 .gitignore updating testrunner so it checks for vows, and cleaning up .gitignore September 13, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 .npmignore updating npmignore April 17, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 LICENSE Initial project import. March 26, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 README.markdown fixing typo in __error__ channel name. kudos htoothrot. October 12, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 index.js Initial project import. March 26, 2011
Octocat-spinner-32 package.json v3.0.0: MAJOR UPDATE - New "Channels" Support. FD Send Support, Error… September 24, 2011
README.markdown

Wormhole

About

Wormhole is a message passing stream parser for Node.JS.

Wormhole is extremely simple and only has 1 main exported function. Once a stream has been passed to Wormhole, it takes over all data events and updates the write function to automatically encode all data given to it.

Install

Wormhole is ready to be installed from NPM, but may also be manually added to your project with git submodules. First CD to your project root. Ensure a directory named node_modules exists.

  • Install with NPM:

    • npm install wormhole
  • Install with GIT:

    • As a submodule:
      • git submodule add git://github.com/aikar/wormhole node_modules/wormhole
      • git submodule update --init --recursive

Update from 2.x to 3.x

If your coming from 2.x, part of the 2.x update added error as the first param to the callbacks.

This has been reverted in 3.x due to the introduction of channels, and now errors fire on the '__error__' channel.

You also now need to pass a channel to Wormhole init call, AND to write() calls, see below.

Usage

Wormhole(stream, channel, callback)

To use Wormhole, simply require it and pass it an instance of net.Stream, a channel to receive events on (call Wormhole multiple times to specify multiple channels) and what function to execute for that channel.

and a callback for messages with function fn(message).

var Wormhole = require('wormhole');
var stdin = process.stdin;
stdin.resume();
Wormhole(stdin, 'channelToReceiveOn', function(msg, fd) {
  // Messages here
});

stream.write(channel, message)

To write data, pass a channel and the message (objects is fine)

var Wormhole = require('wormhole');

net.createServer(function (client) {
    Wormhole(client, 'chat', function (msg) {
        // All messages received from client over chat channel, such as
        // {hello: 'World'}
    });

    Wormhole(client, 'auth', function (msg) {
        // All messages received from client, such as
        // {hello: 'World'}
        if (msg.user == 'foo' && msg.pass == 'bar') {
           client.write('auth', {auth: 'Thank you for logging in'});
        }
    });

    // client.write now overloaded to encode data.
    client.write('auth', {auth: 'Please login!'});
    client.write('chat', {greet: 'Welcome to our server!'});
}).listen(2122);
var client = net.createConnection(2122, function() {
    Wormhole(client, 'chat', function (err, msg) {
        // Messages received from server, such as
        // {greet: 'Welcome to our server!'}
    });
    Wormhole(client, 'auth', function (err, msg) {
        // Messages received from server on auth channel, such as
        // {auth: 'Please login!'}
        // {auth: 'Thank you for logging in!'}
    });
    client.write('auth', {user: 'foo', pass: 'bar'});
    client.write('chat', {hello: 'World'});
});

If you do not expect to receive messages, you still must call Wormhole with the net.Stream but you do not need to pass it a callback or channel, like so:

var Wormhole = require('wormhole');
var client = net.Stream(1); // stream to STDOUT;
Wormhole(client);
client.write('foobar', {foo: 'bar'});

The Wormhole function overwrites the .write function to encode the data.

stream.writeFd(channel, data, fd)

You may also send a file descriptor over a unix socket. This is the same as write(), except that your callback will have a 2nd argument

process.stdin.resume();
var Wormhole = require('wormhole');
Wormhole(process.stdin, "clients", function(msg, fd) {
    console.log("Info about this client:", conn);
    var conn = new net.Socket(fd);
    conn.resume();
    Wormhole(conn);
    conn.write('foo', 'bar');
});

Now you can do this in a parent process

var net = require('net');
var netb = process.binding('net');
var pair = netb.socketpair();
var cp = require('child_process');
var child = cp.spawn(process.execPath,
    ['foo.js'],  // filename for above.
    {
        customFds: [pair[1], -1, -1]
    }
);

child.stdin = new net.Stream(pair[0], 'unix');
child.stdin.resume();

Wormhole(child.stdin);

child.stdin.write("fdchannel", {foo:'bar'}, )

net.createServer(function(conn) {
    child.stdin.write("clients", conn, conn.fd);
}).listen(1020);

Now anytime someone connects to port 1020 on the parent process, the CHILD will receive the FD and be able to send messages directly over the connection without having to do IPC to the parent.

Multiple Receiving Callbacks

Wormhole also has the ability to register more than 1 function per channel. It will execute them in the order they were defined, and stop if any function returns a truthy value.

Wormhole(recv, 'foo', function(msg) {
    console.log("msg handler 1")
});

Wormhole(recv, 'foo', function(msg) {
    console.log("msg handler 2")
    return 1;
});

Wormhole(recv, 'foo', function(msg) {
    console.log("msg handler 3")
});


// send some data to recv on channel foo

This will print msg handler 1, msg handler 2, but not print msg handler 3.

you will likely always want to return true if you know youve processed the message.

Special Channels

__error__

2.x introduced the node style fn(err, ...) callback style. This has been removed in 3.x and gone back to fn(msg) style, with errors now firing on their own channel.

All errors will fire on the __error__ channel, so listen like this:

Wormhole(stream, '__error__', function(err) {
    console.error("Error received: ", err.msg);
    console.error(err.stack);
});

__unknown__

If you receive data on a channel you have not set up a callback function for, it will be sent to the __unknown__ channel. It acts as a catch all for unknows.

To better debug what channel was sent, the channel is passed as the 3rd argument

Wormhole(stream, '__unknown__', function(msg, fd, channel) {
    console.log("Received message on unknown channel", channel,":", msg);
});

*

If you pass * as a channel name, this function will catch ALL messages, including ones already processed by another function or __unknown__channel!

As stated above in the "Multiple Receive Callbacks" section, return true from a function to not execute any more functions if the data is truely processed!

Tests

Wormhole uses the Vows test suite, but is designed to be triggered with my test runner.

npm install testrunner -g then type runtest

Benchmarks

There is a benchmark script in the examples folder to benchmark receiving messages.

Sending bottlenecks the current benchmark, but on a 3.4ghz CPU using 3 cores (2 sending, 1 receiving), with a small message I was able to get up to 310k messages per second.

Contributing

If you would like to contribute, please fork the project on github, make changes and submit pull requests back to me.

Please follow my same coding styles (spaces, no tabs!) and add new test for new functionality.

Please note, that changes may not affect the performance of Wormhole or it will not be accepted!

License

The MIT License

Copyright (c) 2011 Daniel Ennis aikar@aikar.co

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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