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\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
@c %**start of header
@setfilename muse.info
@settitle Muse
@c %**end of header
@dircategory Emacs
@direntry
* Muse: (muse). Authoring and publishing environment for Emacs.
@end direntry
@syncodeindex fn cp
@copying
This manual is for Emacs Muse version 3.03.
Copyright @copyright{} 2004, 2005, 2006,
2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or
any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no
Invariant Sections, with the Front-Cover texts being ``A GNU
Manual'', and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below. A copy of the
license is included in the section entitled ``GNU Free Documentation
License'' in this manual.
(a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: ``You have freedom to copy and modify
this GNU Manual, like GNU software. Copies published by the Free
Software Foundation raise funds for GNU development.''
This document is part of a collection distributed under the GNU Free
Documentation License. If you want to distribute this document
separately from the collection, you can do so by adding a copy of the
license to the document, as described in section 6 of the license.
All Emacs Lisp code contained in this document may be used, distributed,
and modified without restriction.
@end quotation
@end copying
@titlepage
@title Muse manual
@subtitle an authoring and publishing environment
@subtitle for GNU Emacs and XEmacs
@c The following two commands
@c start the copyright page.
@page
@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
@insertcopying
@end titlepage
@c So the toc is printed at the start
@contents
@ifnottex
@node Top, Preface, (dir), (dir)
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@top Muse
@insertcopying
@end ifnottex
@menu
* Preface:: About the documentation.
* Introduction:: What is Muse?
* Obtaining Muse:: How to get Muse releases and development
changes.
* Installation:: Compiling and installing Muse.
* Getting Started:: Setting up Muse and editing files.
* Projects:: Creating and managing Muse projects.
* Keystroke Summary:: Keys used in Muse mode.
* Markup Rules:: Rules for using markup.
* Publishing Styles:: Publishing various types of documents.
* Extending Muse:: Making your own publishing styles.
* Getting Help and Reporting Bugs::
* History:: History of this document.
* Contributors:: Contributors to this documentation.
* GNU Free Documentation License:: The license for this documentation.
* Concept Index:: Search for terms.
@detailmenu
--- The Detailed Node Listing ---
How to Get Muse Releases and Development Changes
* Releases:: Released versions of Muse.
* Development:: Latest unreleased development changes.
Getting Started
* Loading Muse:: How to load Muse.
* Using Muse Mode:: How to edit files in Muse.
* Publishing Files Overview:: Publishing a single file or project.
* File Extensions:: Using a different file extension.
Creating and Managing Muse Projects
* Single Project:: A single-project example.
* Multiple Projects:: A multiple-project example.
* Projects and Subdirectories:: Publishing subdirectories in projects.
* Options for Projects:: Listing of available options for projects.
Rules for Using Markup
* Paragraphs:: Paragraphs: centering and quoting.
* Headings:: Levels of headings.
* Directives:: Directives at the beginning of a
document.
* Emphasizing Text:: Bold, italicized, and underlined text.
* Footnotes:: Making notes to be shown at the end.
* Verse:: Indicating poetic stanzas.
* Lists:: Lists of items.
* Tables:: Generation of data tables.
* Explicit Links:: Hyperlinks and email addresses with
descriptions.
* Implicit Links:: Bare URLs, WikiNames, and InterWiki
links.
* Images:: Publishing and displaying images.
* Horizontal Rules and Anchors:: Inserting a horizontal line or anchor.
* Embedded Lisp:: Evaluating Emacs Lisp code in documents
for extensibility.
* Comments:: Lines to omit from published output.
* Tag Summary:: Tags that Muse recognizes.
Publishing Various Types of Documents
* Blosxom:: Integrating Muse and pyblosxom.cgi.
* Book:: Publishing entries into a compilation.
* DocBook:: Publishing in DocBook XML form.
* HTML:: Publishing in HTML or XHTML form.
* Journal:: Keeping a journal or blog.
* LaTeX:: Publishing LaTeX documents.
* Poem:: Publish a poem to LaTex or PDF.
* Texinfo:: Publish entries to Texinfo format or PDF.
* XML:: Publish entries to XML.
Integrating Muse and pyblosxom.cgi
* Blosxom Requirements:: Other tools needed for the Blosxom style.
* Blosxom Entries:: Format of a Blosxom entry and automation.
* Blosxom Options:: Blosxom styles and options provided.
Making your own publishing styles
* Common Elements:: Common functionality shared by styles.
* Deriving Styles:: Deriving a new style from an existing
one.
Common functionality shared by styles
* Markup Functions:: Specifying functions to mark up text.
* Markup Regexps:: Markup rules for publishing.
* Markup Strings:: Strings specific to a publishing style.
* Markup Tags:: Tag specifications for special markup.
* Style Elements:: Parameters used for defining styles.
@end detailmenu
@end menu
@node Preface, Introduction, Top, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter About the documentation
This document describes Muse, which was written by John Wiegley and is
now maintained by Michael Olson. Several versions of this manual are
available on-line.
@itemize @bullet
@item PDF: http://mwolson.org/static/doc/muse.pdf
@item HTML (single file): http://mwolson.org/static/doc/muse.html
@item HTML (multiple files): http://mwolson.org/static/doc/muse/
@end itemize
@node Introduction, Obtaining Muse, Preface, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter What is Muse?
Emacs Muse is an authoring and publishing environment for Emacs. It
simplifies the process of writing documents and publishing them to
various output formats.
Muse consists of two main parts: an enhanced text-mode for authoring
documents and navigating within Muse projects, and a set of publishing
styles for generating different kinds of output.
What makes Muse distinct from other text-publishing systems is a modular
environment, with a rather simple core, in which "styles" are derived
from to create new styles. Much of Muse's overall functionality is
optional. For example, you can use the publisher without the
major-mode, or the mode without doing any publishing; or if you don't
load the Texinfo or LaTeX modules, those styles won't be available.
The Muse codebase is a departure from emacs-wiki.el version 2.44. The
code has been restructured and rewritten, especially its publishing
functions. The focus in this revision is on the authoring and
publishing aspects, and the "wikiness" has been removed as a default
behavior (available in the optional @file{muse-wiki} module). CamelCase
words are no longer special by default.
One of the principal aims in the development of Muse is to make it very
easy to produce good-looking, standards-compliant documents.
@node Obtaining Muse, Installation, Introduction, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter How to Get Muse Releases and Development Changes
@menu
* Releases:: Released versions of Muse.
* Development:: Latest unreleased development changes.
@end menu
@node Releases, Development, Obtaining Muse, Obtaining Muse
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Released versions of Muse
Choose to install a release if you want to minimize risk.
Errors are corrected in development first. User-visible changes will be
announced on the @email{muse-el-discuss@@gna.org} mailing list.
@xref{Getting Help and Reporting Bugs}.
@cindex releases, Debian package
@cindex Debian package for Muse
Debian users can get Muse via apt-get. The @file{muse-el} package is
available both at Michael Olson's APT repository and the official Debian
repository. To make use of the former, add the following line to your
@file{/etc/apt/sources.list} file and run @code{apt-get install muse}.
@example
deb http://mwolson.org/debian/ ./
@end example
@cindex releases, Ubuntu package
@cindex Ubuntu package for Muse
Ubuntu users can also get Muse via apt-get. The @file{muse-el} package
is available both at Michael Olson's APT repository and the official
Ubuntu repository. To make use of the former, add the following line to
your @file{/etc/apt/sources.list} file and run @code{apt-get install
muse}.
@example
deb http://mwolson.org/ubuntu/ ./
@end example
The reason for making separate Debian and Ubuntu packages is that this
manual is under the GFDL, and Debian will not allow it to be distributed
in its main repository. Ubuntu, on the other hand, permits this manual
to be included with the @file{muse-el} package.
@cindex releases, from source
Alternatively, you can download the latest release from
@uref{http://mwolson.org/static/dist/muse/} .
@node Development, , Releases, Obtaining Muse
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Latest unreleased development changes
@cindex development
Choose the development version if you want to live on the bleeding edge
of Muse development or try out new features before release.
@cindex arch revision control system, using
The Arch revision control system allows you to retrieve previous
versions and select specific features and bug fixes. If you would like
to contribute to Muse development, it is highly recommended that you use
Arch, but this is not a requirement.
If you are new to Arch, you might find this tutorial helpful:
@uref{http://mwolson.org/projects/ArchTutorial.html}.
Downloading the Muse module with Arch and staying up-to-date involves
the following steps.
@enumerate
@item Install arch
@itemize @bullet
@item Debian and Ubuntu: @kbd{apt-get install tla}.
@item Other distributions: see @uref{http://www.gnuarch.org/gnuarchwiki/Getting_Arch}.
@end itemize
@item Register the archive.
@example
tla register-archive -f http://mwolson.org/archives/2006
@end example
You might ask why there is a mention of the year ``2006'' in the name of
the archive. This year is not very significant---it only means that I
created this archive in 2006. I used to create a new archive every
year, but this was a hassle for people who were trying to track
development of Muse, so I have stopped doing it.
@item Download the Muse package.
@example
# Download Muse into the @file{muse} directory.
tla get mwolson@@gnu.org--2006/muse--main--1.0 muse
@end example
@item List upstream changes that are missing from your local copy.
Do this whenever you want to see whether new changes have been committed
to Muse.
@example
# Change to the source directory you are interested in.
cd muse/
# Display the summary of changes
tla missing --summary
@end example
@cindex updating Muse with Arch
@item Update to the latest version by replaying missing changes.
@example
cd muse
tla update
@end example
@end enumerate
There are other ways to interact with the Muse archive.
@itemize
@item Browse arch repository: @uref{http://archzoom.mwolson.org/}
@item Latest development snapshot: @uref{http://mwolson.org/static/dist/muse-latest.tar.gz}
@item Latest development snapshot (zip file): @uref{http://mwolson.org/static/dist/muse-latest.zip}
@end itemize
The latest development snapshot will be kept up-to-date since it is
updated at the same time as the Arch repository.
@node Installation, Getting Started, Obtaining Muse, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Compiling and Installing Muse
Muse may be compiled and installed on your machine.
@subheading Compilation
This is an optional step, since Emacs Lisp source code does not
necessarily have to be byte-compiled. Byte-compilation may yield a very
slight speed increase.
A working copy of Emacs or XEmacs is needed in order to compile Emacs
Muse. By default, the program that is installed with the name
@command{emacs} will be used.
If you want to use the @command{xemacs} binary to perform the
compilation, you would need to edit @file{Makefile.defs} in the
top-level directory as follows. You can put either a full path to an
Emacs or XEmacs binary or just the command name, as long as it is in the
@env{PATH}.
@example
EMACS = xemacs
SITEFLAG = -no-site-file
@end example
Running @code{make} in the top-level directory should compile the Muse
source files in the @file{lisp} directory, and generate an autoloads
file in @file{lisp/muse-autoloads.el}.
@subheading Installation
Muse may be installed into your file hierarchy by doing the following.
Edit the @file{Makefile.defs} file so that @env{ELISPDIR} points to
where you want the source and compiled Muse files to be installed and
@env{INFODIR} indicates where to put the Muse manual. As mentioned
earlier, you will want to edit @env{EMACS} and @env{SITEFLAG} as shown
in the Compilation section if you are using XEmacs.
If you are installing Muse on a Debian or Ubuntu system, you might want
to change the value of @env{INSTALLINFO} as specified in
@file{Makefile.defs}.
If you wish to install Muse to different locations than the defaults
specify, edit @file{Makefile.defs} accordingly.
Run @code{make} as a normal user.
Run @code{make install} as the root user if you have chosen installation
locations that require root permissions.
@node Getting Started, Projects, Installation, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Getting Started
@cindex settings
@menu
* Loading Muse:: How to load Muse.
* Using Muse Mode:: How to edit files in Muse.
* Publishing Files Overview:: Publishing a single file or project.
* File Extensions:: Using a different file extension.
@end menu
@node Loading Muse, Using Muse Mode, Getting Started, Getting Started
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section How to Load Muse
@cindex settings, init file
To use Muse, add the directory containing its files to your
@code{load-path} variable, in your @file{.emacs} file. Then, load in
the authoring mode, and the styles you wish to publish to. An example
follows.
@lisp
(add-to-list 'load-path "<path to Muse>")
(require 'muse-mode) ; load authoring mode
(require 'muse-html) ; load publishing styles I use
(require 'muse-latex)
(require 'muse-texinfo)
(require 'muse-docbook)
(require 'muse-project) ; publish files in projects
@end lisp
An easy way of seeing which settings are available and changing settings
is to use the Muse customization interface. To do this, type
@kbd{M-x customize-group muse RET}. Each of the options has its own
documentation. Options are grouped logically according to what effect
they have.
@node Using Muse Mode, Publishing Files Overview, Loading Muse, Getting Started
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section How to Edit Files in Muse
@cindex editing Muse files
Muse Mode should automatically be activated when you visit a file with a
``.muse'' extension. One such file is @file{QuickStart.muse}, which is
available in the @file{examples} directory of the Muse distribution.
You can tell that Muse Mose has been activated by checking for the text
``Muse'' in your mode line. If Muse Mode has not been activated, you
may activate it by type @kbd{M-x muse-mode RET}.
You will notice that Muse files are highlighted very simply. Links are
colored blue, headings are large and bold text, and @verb{|<example>|}
tags are colored in grey.
There are several different ways to edit things like links, which hide
the underlying Muse markup. One way is to toggle font-locking off by
hitting @kbd{C-c C-l}, which is also @kbd{M-x font-lock-mode}, make
changes, and then hit @kbd{C-c C-l} again to toggle font-locking back
on. Another way is just to move into the text and edit it. Markup can
also be removed by normal deletion methods, though some side effects
might require a second deletion.
For the particular case of editing links, it is easiest to move to the
link and do @kbd{C-c C-e}, which is also @kbd{M-x
muse-edit-link-at-point}. This prompts you for the link and its
description, using the previous contents of the link as initial values.
A link to another Muse file may be created by hitting @kbd{C-c TAB l}.
A link to a URL may be created by hitting @kbd{C-c TAB u}. Links may be
followed by hitting @kbd{RET} on them.
If you want to add a new list item, this may by accomplished by hitting
@kbd{M-RET}. This will put a dash and some spaces on the screen. The
dash is the Muse markup that indicates a list item. It is also possible
to created ``nested'' lists with this command, by adjusting the number
of spaces in front of the dashes. If you have lists with long lines,
you can move to a list item and hit @kbd{M-q} to wrap it onto multiple
lines.
@node Publishing Files Overview, File Extensions, Using Muse Mode, Getting Started
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing a Single File or Project
@cindex editing Muse files
The command @kbd{M-x muse-project-publish-this-file} will publish the
current document to any available publishing style (a publishing style
is an output format, like HTML or Docbook), placing the output in the
current directory. If you are in Muse Mode, this command will be bound
to @kbd{C-c C-t}. If the file has been published recently, and its
contents have not changed, running @kbd{C-c C-t} again will not publish
the file. To force publishing in this case, do @kbd{C-u C-c C-t}.
If you have set up projects and are visiting a file that is part of a
project, then @kbd{C-c C-t} will restrict the output formats to those
which are used by the project, and will automatically publish to the
output directory defined by the project. If you want to publish to a
different directory or use a different format, then use @kbd{C-c M-C-t},
which is also @kbd{M-x muse-publish-this-file}.
If the currently opened file is part of a defined project in
@code{muse-project-alist}, it (and the rest of the changed files in a
project) may be published using @kbd{C-c C-p}.
@node File Extensions, , Publishing Files Overview, Getting Started
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Using a Different File Extension
@cindex file extension, specifying
By default, Muse expects all project files to have the file extension
@file{.muse}. Files without this extension will not be associated with
Muse mode and will not be considered part of any project, even if they
are within a project directory.
If you don't want to use @file{.muse}, you can customize the extension
by setting the value of @code{muse-file-extension}.
If you don't want to use any extension at all, and want Muse to
autodetect project files based on their location, then add the following
to your Muse settings file.
@lisp
(setq muse-file-extension nil
muse-mode-auto-p t)
@end lisp
Note that if you chose to have @code{muse-file-extension} set to
@code{nil}, you may have trouble if your @file{.emacs} file or other
init scripts attempt to visit a Muse file. (A very common example of
this is if you use Planner with Muse and run @code{(plan)} from your
@file{.emacs}.) If you wish to visit Muse files from your
@file{.emacs}, be sure to also add the following additional code before
any such visits happen:
@lisp
(add-hook 'find-file-hooks 'muse-mode-maybe)
@end lisp
@node Projects, Keystroke Summary, Getting Started, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Creating and Managing Muse Projects
@cindex projects
Often you will want to publish all the files within a directory to a
particular set of output styles automatically. To support, Muse
allows for the creation of "projects".
@menu
* Single Project:: A single-project example.
* Multiple Projects:: A multiple-project example.
* Projects and Subdirectories:: Publishing subdirectories in projects.
* Options for Projects:: Listing of available options for projects.
@end menu
@node Single Project, Multiple Projects, Projects, Projects
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section A Single-Project Example
@cindex projects, single
Here is a sample project, which may be defined in your @file{.emacs}
file.
@lisp
(setq muse-project-alist
'(("Website" ("~/Pages" :default "index")
(:base "html" :path "~/public_html")
(:base "pdf" :path "~/public_html/pdf"))))
@end lisp
The above defines a project named "website", whose files are located
in the directory @file{~/Pages}. The default page to visit is
@file{index}. When this project is published, each page will be
output as HTML to the directory @file{~/public_html}, and as PDF to
the directory @file{~/public_html/pdf}. Within any project page, you
may create a link to other pages using the syntax @samp{[[pagename]]}.
If you would like to include only some files from a directory in a Muse
project, you may use a regexp in place of @file{~/Pages} in the example.
@node Multiple Projects, Projects and Subdirectories, Single Project, Projects
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section A Multiple-Project Example
@cindex projects, multiple
It is possible to specify multiple projects. Here is an example of
three projects: a generic website, a projects area, and a day-planner
(the day-planner part requires Planner Mode---see
@uref{http://wjsullivan.net/PlannerMode.html} to get it).
@lisp
(setq muse-project-alist
'(("Website" ("~/Pages" :default "index")
(:base "html" :path "~/public_html"))
(("Projects" ("~/Projects" :default "index")
(:base "xhtml"
:path "~/public_html/projects"
:exclude "/TopSecret")
(:base "pdf"
:path "~/public_html/projects/pdf"
:exclude "/TopSecret")))
("Plans" ("~/Plans"
:default "TaskPool"
:major-mode planner-mode
:visit-link planner-visit-link)
(:base "planner-xhtml"
:path "~/public_html/plans"))))
@end lisp
The @samp{:major-mode} attribute specifies which major to use when
visiting files in this directory.
The @samp{:visit-link} attribute specifies the function to call when
visiting links.
The @samp{:exclude} attribute has a regexp that matches files to never
publish.
@node Projects and Subdirectories, Options for Projects, Multiple Projects, Projects
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing Subdirectories in Projects
@cindex projects, subdirectories
If you want to publish a directory and all of its subdirectories, Muse
provides two convenience functions that together generate the proper
rules for you. Note that we use the backtick to begin this
muse-project-alist definition, rather than a single quote.
@lisp
(setq muse-project-alist
`(("Website" ("~/Pages" :default "index")
(:base "html" :path "~/public_html"))
("Blog" (,@@(muse-project-alist-dirs "~/Blog")
:default "index")
;; Publish this directory and its subdirectories. Arguments
;; are as follows. The above `muse-project-alist-dirs' part
;; is also needed.
;; 1. Source directory
;; 2. Output directory
;; 3. Publishing style
;; remainder: Other things to put in every generated style
,@@(muse-project-alist-styles "~/Blog"
"~/public_html/blog"
"blosxom"))))
@end lisp
The @code{muse-project-alist-dirs} function takes a directory and
returns it and all of its subdirectories in a list.
The @code{muse-project-alist-styles} function is explained by the
comments above.
The ``blosxom'' text is the name of another publishing style, much like
``html''. @xref{Blosxom}, for further information about it. You can
use any publishing style you like for the third argument to
@code{muse-project-alist-styles}.
@node Options for Projects, , Projects and Subdirectories, Projects
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Listing of Available Options for Projects
@cindex projects, options
@cindex muse-project-alist, reference
This is a listing of all of the various options (or, more accurately:
attributes) that may be specified in @code{muse-project-alist}.
Each muse-project-alist entry looks like this:
@example
(PROJECT-NAME (SOURCES)
OUTPUTS)
@end example
We refer to these names below.
``Attributes'', which compose SOURCES and OUTPUTS, are a pair of values.
The first value is a keyword, like @option{:default}. The second part
is the value associated with that keyword, such as the text ``index''.
If you are familiar with Emacs Lisp property lists, the concept is
similar to that, except that in the SOURCES section, single directories
can be interspersed with two-value attributes.
@subheading Project Name
This is a string that indicates the name of the project. It is
primarily used for publishing interwiki links with the
@file{muse-wiki.el} module.
@subheading Sources
This part of a muse-project-alist entry consists of two-value
attributes, and also directory names. If you are publishing a book, the
order of directories and attributes is significant.
The minimal content for the sources section is a list of directories.
@table @option
@item :book-chapter
Indicates a new chapter of a book. The text of the title of the chapter
comes immediately after this keyword.
@item :book-end
Indicates the end of a book. Directories listed after this one are
ignored when publishing a book. The value ``t'' (without quotes) should
come immediately after this keyword.
@item :book-funcall
A function to call while publishing a book. This is useful for doing
something just after a particular chapter.
@item :book-part
Indicates the beginning of a new part of the book. The text of the
title should come immediately after this keyword.
@item :book-style
Indicate a particular publishing style to use for this part of the book.
If this is specified, it should come just after a @option{:part}
attribute.
@item :default
The default page to visit when browsing a project. Also, if you are
using the @file{muse-wiki.el} module, publishing a link to just a
project's name will cause it to link to this default file.
@item :force-publish
This specifies a list of pages which should be published every time a
project is published (by using @kbd{C-c C-p}, for example), regardless
of whether their contents have changed. This is useful for updating
Index pages, pages that use the @verb{|<include>|} tag, and other pages
that have dynamically-generated content.
@item :major-mode
This specifies the major mode to use when visiting files in this
project. The default is @code{muse-mode}.
@item :nochapters
This indicates that while publishing a book, do not automatically create
chapters. Values which may follow this are nil (the default, which
means that we automatically create chapters), or non-nil, which means
that we manually specify chapters with the @option{:book-chapter}
attribute,
@item :publish-project
Indicates which function we should call when publishing a project.
@item :set
This specifies a list of variables and values to set when publishing a
project. The list should be a property list, which is in the form:
@example
(VAR1 VALUE1 VAR2 VALUE2 ...)
@end example
@item :visit-link
Specifies the function to call when visiting a link. The default is
@code{muse-visit-link-default}. The arguments for that function should
be (1) the link and (2) whether to visit the link in a new window.
@end table
@subheading Outputs
This part of a muse-project-alist entry is composed of lists of
attributes. Each list is called an ``output style''.
The minimal content for an output style is a @option{:base} attribute
and a @option{:path} attribute.
@table @option
@item :base
Publishing style to use, such as ``html'', ``docbook'', or ``pdf''.
@item :base-url
An external URL which can be used to access published files. This is
mainly used by the @file{muse-wiki} module when publishing links between
two separate projects, if the projects are served on different domains.
It is also used by the @file{muse-journal} module to create the RSS or
RDF output.
@item :exclude
Exclude items matching a regexp from being published. The regexp should
usually begin with "/".
@item :include
Only include items matching a regexp when publishing. The regexp should
usually begin with "/".
@item :path
The directory in which to store published files.
@item :timestamps
A file containing the timestamps (that is, time of creation) for files
in this project. It might eventually used by the @file{muse-blosxom}
module, but this option is not currently in use by any Muse code.
@end table
@node Keystroke Summary, Markup Rules, Projects, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Keys Used in Muse Mode
@cindex keystrokes
This is a summary of keystrokes available in every Muse buffer.
@table @kbd
@item C-c C-a (`muse-index')
Display an index of all known Muse pages.
@item C-c C-b (`muse-find-backlinks')
Find all pages that link to this page.
@item C-c C-e (`muse-edit-link-at-point')
Edit link at point.
@item C-c C-f (`muse-project-find-file')
Open another Muse page. Prompt for the name.
@item C-c C-i l, C-c TAB l (`muse-insert-relative-link-to-file')
Insert a link to a file interactively.
@item C-c C-i t, C-c TAB t (`muse-insert-tag')
Insert a tag interactively.
@item C-c C-i u, C-c TAB u (`muse-insert-url')
Insert a URL interactively.
@item C-c C-l (`font-lock-mode')
Toggle font lock / highlighting for the current buffer.
@item C-c C-p (`muse-project-publish')
Publish any Muse pages that have changed.
@item C-c C-s (`muse-search')
Find text in all files of the current project.
@item C-c C-t (`muse-project-publish-this-file')
Publish the currently-visited file. Prompt for the style if the current
file can be published using more than one style.
@item C-c C-S-t, or C-c C-M-t (`muse-publish-this-file')
Publish the currently-visited file. Prompt for both the style and
output directory.
@item C-c C-v (`muse-browse-result')
Show the published result of this page.
@item C-c = (`muse-what-changed')
Diff this page against the last backup version.
@item TAB
Move to the next Wiki reference.
@item S-TAB
Move to the previous Wiki reference.
@item M-TAB
Complete the name of a page from the current project at point.
@item M-RET
Insert a new list item at point, indenting properly.
@item C-<
Decrease the indentation of the list item at point.
@item C->
Increase the indentation of the list item at point.
@item M-x muse-colors-toggle-inline-images RET
Toggle display of inlined images on/off.
@end table
@node Markup Rules, Publishing Styles, Keystroke Summary, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Rules for Using Markup
@cindex markup
A Muse document uses special, contextual markup rules to determine how
to format the output result. For example, if a paragraph is indented,
Muse assumes it should be quoted.
There are not too many markup rules, and all of them strive to be as
simple as possible so that you can focus on document creation, rather
than formatting.
@menu
* Paragraphs:: Paragraphs: centering and quoting.
* Headings:: Levels of headings.
* Directives:: Directives at the beginning of a
document.
* Emphasizing Text:: Bold, italicized, and underlined text.
* Footnotes:: Making notes to be shown at the end.
* Verse:: Indicating poetic stanzas.
* Lists:: Lists of items.
* Tables:: Generation of data tables.
* Explicit Links:: Hyperlinks and email addresses with
descriptions.
* Implicit Links:: Bare URLs, WikiNames, and InterWiki
links.
* Images:: Publishing and displaying images.
* Horizontal Rules and Anchors:: Inserting a horizontal line or anchor.
* Embedded Lisp:: Evaluating Emacs Lisp code in documents
for extensibility.
* Comments:: Lines to omit from published output.
* Tag Summary:: Tags that Muse recognizes.
@end menu
@node Paragraphs, Headings, Markup Rules, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Paragraphs: centering and quoting
@cindex paragraphs
Paragraphs in Muse must be separated by a blank line.
@cindex paragraphs, centered
@subheading Centered paragraphs and quotations
A line that begins with six or more columns of whitespace (either tabs
or spaces) indicates a centered paragraph. Alternatively, you can use
the @verb{|<center>|} tag to surround regions that are to be published as
centered paragraphs.
@cindex paragraphs, quoted
@cindex quotations
But if a line begins with whitespace, though less than six columns, it
indicates a quoted paragraph. Alternatively, you can use the
@verb{|<quote>|} tag to surround regions that are to be published as
quoted paragraphs.
@cindex examples
@cindex monospace, rendering blocks
@cindex HTML, rendering blocks in monospace
@subheading Literal paragraphs
The @verb{|<example>|} tag is used for examples, where whitespace should
be preserved, the text rendered in monospace, and any characters special
to the output style escaped.
@cindex literal text
@cindex HTML, inserting a raw block
There is also the @verb{|<literal>|} tag, which causes a marked block to
be entirely left alone. This can be used for inserting a hand-coded
HTML blocks into HTML output, for example.
If you want some text to only be inserted when publishing to a
particular publishing style, use the @option{style} attribute for the
@verb{|<literal>|} tag. An example follows.
@example
<literal style="latex">
A LaTeX-based style was used in the publishing of this document.
</literal>
@end example
This will leave the region alone if the current publishing style is
``latex'' or based on ``latex'', such as ``pdf'', and delete the region
otherwise. It is also possible to leave the text alone only for one
particular style, rather than its derivations, by adding
@code{exact="t"} to the tag.
@node Headings, Directives, Paragraphs, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Levels of headings
@cindex headings
A heading becomes a chapter or section in printed output -- depending on
the style. To indicate a heading, start a new paragraph with one or
more asterices, followed by a space and the heading title. Then begin
another paragraph to enter the text for that section.
All levels of headings will be published. Most publishing styles only
distinguish the between the first 4 levels, however.
@example
* First level
** Second level
*** Third level
**** Fourth level
@end example
@node Directives, Emphasizing Text, Headings, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Directives at the beginning of a document
@cindex directives
Directives are lines beginning with the @samp{#} character that come
before any paragraphs or sections in the document. Directives are of
the form ``#directive content of directive''. You can use any
combination of uppercase and lowercase letters for directives, even if
the directive is not in the list below.
The @code{muse-publishing-directive} function may be used in header and
footer text to access directives. For example, to access the
@samp{#title} directive, use @code{(muse-publishing-directive "title")}.
The following is a list of directives that Muse uses.
@table @code
@cindex #author
@item #author
The author of this document.
If this is not specified, Muse will attempt to figure it out from the
@code{user-full-name} variable.
@cindex #date
@item #date
The date that the document was last modified.
This is used by publishing styles that are able to embed the date
information.
@cindex #desc
@item #desc
A short description of this document.
This is used by the @code{journal} publishing style to embed information
inside of an RSS/RDF feed.
@cindex #title
@item #title
The title of this document.
If this is not specified, the name of the file is used.
@end table
@node Emphasizing Text, Footnotes, Directives, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Bold, italicized, and underlined text
@cindex emphasizing text
@cindex underlining text
@cindex italicizing text
@cindex verbatim text
@cindex monospace, rendering words
To emphasize text, surround it with certain specially recognized
characters.
@example
*emphasis*
**strong emphasis**
***very strong emphasis***
_underlined_
=verbatim and monospace=
@end example
@cindex WYSIWYG
While editing a Muse document in Muse mode, these forms of emphasis will
be highlighted in a WYSIWYG manner. Each of these forms may span
multiple lines.
Verbatim text will be colored as gray by default. To change this,
customize @code{muse-verbatim-face}.
You can also use the @verb{|<code>|} tag to indicate verbatim and
monospace text. This is handy for regions that have an ``='' in them.
@node Footnotes, Verse, Emphasizing Text, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Making notes to be shown at the end
@cindex footnotes
A footnote reference is simply a number in square brackets. To define
the footnote, place this definition at the bottom of your file.
@samp{footnote-mode} can be used to greatly facilitate the creation of
these kinds of footnotes.
Footnotes are defined by the same number in brackets occurring at the
beginning of a line. Use footnote-mode's @kbd{C-c ! a} command, to very
easily insert footnotes while typing. Use @kbd{C-x C-x} to return to
the point of insertion.
@node Verse, Lists, Footnotes, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Indicating poetic stanzas
@cindex verses
@cindex poetry
Poetry requires that whitespace be preserved, but without resorting to
monospace. To indicate this, use the following markup, reminiscent of
email quotations.
@example
> A line of Emacs verse;
> forgive its being so terse.
@end example
You can also use the @verb{|<verse>|} tag, if you prefer.
@example
<verse>
A line of Emacs verse;
forgive its being so terse.
</verse>
@end example
@cindex verses, multiple stanzas
Multiple stanzas may be included in one set of @verb{|<verse>|} tags, as
follows.
@example
<verse>
A line of Emacs verse;
forgive its being so terse.
In terms of terse verse,
you could do worse.
</verse>
@end example
@node Lists, Tables, Verse, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Lists of items
@cindex lists
Lists are given using special characters at the beginning of a line.
Whitespace must occur before bullets or numbered items, to distinguish
from the possibility of those characters occurring in a real sentence.
@cindex lists, bullets
These are rendered as a bullet list.
@example
Normal text.
- bullet item one
- bullet item two
@end example
@cindex lists, enumerated
An enumerated list follows.
@example
Normal text.
1. Enum item one
2. Enum item two
@end example
@cindex lists, definitions
Here is a definition list.
@example
Term1 ::
This is a first definition
And it has two lines;
no, make that three.
Term2 :: This is a second definition
@end example
@subheading Nested lists
@cindex lists, nested
It is possible to nest lists of the same or different kinds. The
``level'' of the list is determined by the amount of initial whitespace.
@example
Normal text.
- Level 1, bullet item one
1. Level 2, enum item one
2. Level 2, enum item two
- Level 1, bullet item two
1. Level 2, enum item three
2. Level 2, enum item four
term :: definition
@end example
@subheading Breaking list items
@cindex lists, breaking lines
If you want to break up a line within any list type, just put one blank
line between the end of the previous line and the beginning of the next
line, using the same amount of initial indentation.
@example
- bullet item 1, line 1
bullet item 1, line 2
1. Enum line 1
Enum line 2
- bullet item 2, line 1
bullet item 2, line 2
@end example
@node Tables, Explicit Links, Lists, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Generation of data tables
@cindex tables
@cindex tables, simple
Only very simple tables are supported. The syntax is as follows.
@example
Double bars || Separate header fields
Single bars | Separate body fields
Here are more | body fields
Triple bars ||| Separate footer fields
@end example
Some publishing styles require header fields to come first, then footer
fields, and then the body fields. You can use any order for these
sections that you like, and Muse will re-order them for you at
publish-time.
If you wish to disable table generation for one Muse file, add the
directive @samp{#disable-tables t} to the top of the file.
@subheading Other table formats
@cindex tables, orgtbl-mode style
It is possible to publish very basic Orgtbl-mode style tables.
@example
| org | style | table |
|------+-------+-------|
| one | | one |
| two | two | |
| | three | three |
|------+-------+-------|
| more | stuff | |
@end example
If you are used to the way that Org Mode publishes these tables, then
customize `muse-html-table-attributes' to the following, in order to get
a similar kind of output.
@example
border="2" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" rules="groups" frame="hsides"
@end example
@cindex tables, table.el style
@file{table.el} style tables are also supported, as long as
@file{table.el} itself supports outputting tables for a particular
publishing style. At the time of this writing, the ``html'', ``latex'',
and ``docbook'' styles are supported by @file{table.el}. Styles derived
from these styles will also work.
@example
+---+-----+---+
| | one | 1 |
+---+-----+---+
| b | two | |
+---+-----+---+
| c | | 3 |
+---+-----+---+
@end example
@node Explicit Links, Implicit Links, Tables, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Hyperlinks and email addresses with descriptions
@cindex links, explicit
A hyperlink can reference a URL, or another page within a Muse
project. In addition, descriptive text can be specified, which should
be displayed rather than the link text in output styles that supports
link descriptions. The syntax is as follows.
@example
[[link target][link description]]
[[link target without description]]
@end example
Thus, the current maintainer's homepage for Muse can be found
@samp{[[http://mwolson.org/projects/EmacsMuse.html][here]]},
or at @samp{[[http://mwolson.org/projects/EmacsMuse.html]]}.
@node Implicit Links, Images, Explicit Links, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Bare URLs, WikiNames, and InterWiki links
@cindex links, implicit
@cindex links, raw
@cindex URLs
@cindex Email addresses
A URL or email address encountered in the input text is published as a
hyperlink. These kind of links are called @dfn{implicit links} because
they are not separated from the rest of the Muse document in any way.
Some characters in URLs will prevent Muse from recognizing them as
implicit links. If you want to link to a URL containing spaces or any of
the characters ``][,"'`()<>^'', you will have to make the link
explicit. The punctuation characters ``.,;:'' are also not recognized as
part of a URL when they appear at its end. For information on how to
make an explicit link, see @ref{Explicit Links,,Hyperlinks and email
addresses with descriptions}.
@cindex WikiNames
If the @command{muse-wiki} module is loaded, another form of implicit
link will be made available. WikiNames, which are typed in CamelCase,
are highlighted and published as links, provided that the file they
refer to exists.
Customization of WikiName recognition may be accomplished by editing the
@code{muse-wiki-wikiword-regexp} option and subsequently running
@code{(muse-configure-highlighting 'muse-colors-markupmuse-colors-markup)}.
If you use the Customize interface, the latter will be done
automatically.
@cindex InterWiki links
@cindex inter-project links
The @command{muse-wiki} module also allows for InterWiki links. These
are similar to WikiWords, but they specify both the project and page of
a file. The names of your project entries in @code{muse-project-alist}
will be used as InterWiki names by default. Several examples follow.
@example
Blog::DocumentingMuse
Projects#EmacsMuse
Website
@end example
In the first case, the interwiki delimiter is @samp{::}, @samp{Blog} is
the project name, and @samp{DocumentingMuse} is the page name. In the
second example, @samp{#} is the interwiki delimiter. If the name of a
project occurs by itself in text, like the third case, it will be
colorized and published as a link to the default page of the given
project.
Customization of interwiki links may be accomplished by editing the
@code{muse-wiki-interwiki-alist} option.
It is also possible to link to an anchor in an interwiki document. This
is called a ``three-part link''. Examples of this follow.
@example
Blog::DocumentingMuse#anchor1
Projects#EmacsMuse#anchor2
@end example
@node Images, Horizontal Rules and Anchors, Implicit Links, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing and displaying images
@cindex images
@cindex links, with images
@subheading Image links
Links to images may be used in either the target or the description, or
both. Thus, the following code will publish as a clickable image that
points to @url{http://mwolson.org/}.
@example
[[http://mwolson.org/][/static/logos/site-logo.png]]
@end example
Normally, images in the link part will be inlined.
If you want these images to be published as links instead, place the
text ``URL:'' immediately in front of the link text. An example
follows.
@example
[[URL:http://mwolson.org/static/logos/site-logo.png]]
@end example
@cindex images, displaying
@cindex images, local
@subheading Displaying images in Muse mode
If a link to a locally-available image is encountered in the link
description, Muse mode will attempt to display it if your version of
Emacs permits this.
This behavior may be toggled with @kbd{C-c C-i}, or disabled permanently
by setting the @code{muse-colors-inline-images} option to @code{nil}.
The method for finding images may be altered by customizing the
@code{muse-colors-inline-image-method} option. One useful value for
this option is @code{muse-colors-use-publishing-directory}, which tells
Muse mode to look in the directory where the current file will be
published. The default is to look in the current directory. Relative
paths like @samp{../pics/} should work for either setting.
Eventually, it is hoped that Muse will be able to copy images from the a
``source'' directory to a publishing directory by customizing
@code{muse-project-alist}, but this has not been implemented yet.
@cindex images, without descriptions
@cindex images, inlined
@subheading Publishing simple images
The following example will display correctly and publish correctly if a
@acronym{PNG} file called @file{TestLogo.png} exists in the
@file{../pics/} directory. If text is on the same line as the picture,
it will remain so in the output.
@example
[[../myimage.png]]
@end example
@cindex images, captions
@subheading Publishing images with captions
If you want to add a caption to an image, use the following syntax.
This will center the image (if the output format supports it) and add a
centered caption below the picture. Formats that do not support
centering the image will instead leave it against the left margin.
@example
[[../pics/mycat.png][My cat Dexter]]
@end example
Images with captions may only occur in their own paragraphs, with no
text on the same line. Otherwise, the published output will not be
syntactically correct.
@node Horizontal Rules and Anchors, Embedded Lisp, Images, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Inserting a horizontal line or anchor
@cindex horizontal rules
@cindex dashes
@subheading Horizontal Rules
Four or more dashes indicate a horizontal rule. Be sure to put blank
lines around it, or it will be considered part of the proceeding or
following paragraph!
@cindex anchors
@cindex links, with target on same page
@subheading Anchors
If you begin a line with "#anchor" -- where "anchor" can be any word
that doesn't contain whitespace -- it defines an anchor at that point
into the document. This point can be referenced using "page#anchor" as
the target in a Muse link.
@node Embedded Lisp, Comments, Horizontal Rules and Anchors, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Evaluating Emacs Lisp code in documents for extensibility
@cindex lisp, embedded
Arbitrary kinds of markup can be achieved using the @verb{|<lisp>|} tag,
which is the only Muse tag supported in a style's header and footer
text. With the @verb{|<lisp>|} tag, you may generated whatever output
text you wish. The inserted output will get marked up, if the
@verb{|<lisp>|} tag appears within the main text of the document.
@example
<lisp>(concat "This form gets " "inserted")</lisp>
@end example
@cindex lisp, and insert command
Note that you should not use the @code{insert} command within a set of
@verb{|<lisp>|} tags, since the return value from the @verb{|<lisp>|}
tags will be automatically inserted into the document.
It is also possible to treat the output as if it were surrounded by the
@verb{|<example>|}, @verb{|<src>|}, or @verb{|<verse>|} tags, by
specifying ``example'', ``src'', or ``verse'' as the @option{markup}
attribute of the @verb{|<lisp>|} tag.
@example
<lisp markup="example">
(concat "Insert" " me")
</lisp>
@end example
Other languages also have tags that cause source code to be evaluated.
@xref{Tag Summary}, for details.
@node Comments, Tag Summary, Embedded Lisp, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Lines to omit from published output
@cindex comments
@cindex publishing, omitting lines
Use the following syntax to indicate a comment. Comments will not be
published.
@example
; Comment text goes here.
@end example
That is, only a semi-colon at the beginning of a line, followed by a
literal space, will cause that line to be treated as a comment.
You can alternatively surround the region with the @verb{|<comment>|}
tag.
If you wish the comment to be published, but just commented out using
the comment syntax of the output format, then set
@option{muse-publish-comments-p} to non-nil.
@node Tag Summary, , Comments, Markup Rules
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Tags that Muse recognizes
@cindex tags
@cindex inserting files at publish time
@cindex publishing, including markup in headers and footers
@cindex publishing, inserting files
Muse has several built-in tags that may prove useful during publishing.
@xref{muse-publish-markup-tags}, to see how to customize the tags that
Muse uses, as well as make your own tags.
@subheading Syntax
If a tag takes arguments, it will look like this, where ``tagname'' is
the name of the tag.
@example
<tagname arg1="string1" arg2="string2">
@end example
If you want the tag to look like it came straight from an XHTML
document, you can alternatively do the following.
@example
<tagname arg1="string1" arg2="string2" />
@end example
If a tag surrounds some text, it will look like this.
@example
<tagname>Some text</tagname>
@end example
If a tag surrounds a large region, it will look like this.
@example
<tagname>
Some text.
Some more text.
</tagname>
@end example
@subheading Tag listing
This is the complete list of tags that Muse accepts, including those
that were mentioned in previous sections.
@table @samp
@item <class>
If publishing to HTML, surround the given text with a @verb{|<span>|}
tag. It takes one argument called ``name'' that specifies the class
attribute of the @verb{|<span>|} tag.
If publishing to a different format, do nothing extra to the text.
@item <code>
Treat the text surrounded by the tag as if they were enclosed in equal
signs, that is, make it monospace.
@item <command>
Run a command on the region, replacing the region with the result of the
command. The command is specified with the ``interp'' argument. If no
value for ``interp'' is given, pass the entire region to the shell.
The ``markup'' argument controls how this section is marked up.
If it is omitted, publish the region with the normal Muse rules.
If "nil", do not mark up the region at all, but prevent Muse from
further interpreting it.
If "example", treat the region as if it was surrounded by the
@verb{|<example>|} tag.
If "src", treat the included text as if it was surrounded by the
@verb{|<src>|} tag. You should also specify the ``lang'' attribute if
doing this.
If "verse", treat the region as if it was surrounded by the
@verb{|<verse>|} tag, to preserve newlines.
Otherwise, it should be the name of a function to call, with the buffer
narrowed to the region.
@item <comment>
Treat the entire region as a comment. If the option
@var{muse-publish-comments-p} is nil, delete the region, otherwise
publish it using the comment syntax of the current publishing style.
@item <contents>
Publish a Table of Contents. This will either be inserted in-place or
at the beginning of the document, depending on your publishing style.
It does not have a delimiting tag.
By default, only 2 levels of headings will be included in the generated
Table of Contents. To change this globally, customize the
@var{muse-publish-contents-depth} option. To change this only for the
current tag, use the ``depth'' argument.
@item <example>
Publish the region in monospace, preserving the newlines in the region.
This is useful for snippets of code.
@item <include>
Insert the given file at the current location during publishing. The
basic use of this tag is as follows, replacing ``included_file'' with
the name of the file that you want to include.
@example
<include file="included_file">
@end example
The ``markup'' argument controls how this section is marked up.
If it is omitted, publish the included text with the normal Muse
rules.
If "nil", do not mark up the included text at all.
If "example", treat the included text as if it was surrounded by the
@verb{|<example>|} tag.
If "src", treat the included text as if it was surrounded by the
@verb{|<src>|} tag. You should also specify the ``lang'' attribute if
doing this.
If "verse", treat the included text as if it was surrounded by the
@verb{|<verse>|} tag, to preserve newlines.
Otherwise, it should be the name of a function to call after inserting
the file with the buffer narrowed to the section inserted.
@item <lisp>
Evaluate the Emacs Lisp expressions between the initial and ending tags.
The result is then inserted into the document, so you do not need to
explicitly call @code{insert}. All text properties are removed from the
resulting text.
This tag takes the ``markup'' argument. See the description of
@verb{|<command>|} for details.
@item <literal>
Make sure that the text enclosed by this tag is published without
escaping it in any way. This is useful for inserting markup directly
into the published document, when Muse does not provide the desired
functionality.
@item <markup>
Mark up the text between the initial and ending tags. The markup
command to use may be specified by the ``function'' argument. The
standard Muse markup routines are used by default if no ``function''
argument is provided.
This is useful for marking up regions in headers and footers. One
example that comes to mind is generating a published index of all of the
files in the current project by doing the following.
@example
<markup><lisp>(muse-index-as-string t t)</lisp></markup>
@end example
@item <perl>
Run the @command{perl} language interpreter on the region, replacing the
region with the result of the command.
This tag takes the ``markup'' argument. See the description of
@verb{|<command>|} for details.
@item <python>
Run the @command{python} language interpreter on the region, replacing
the region with the result of the command.
This tag takes the ``markup'' argument. See the description of
@verb{|<command>|} for details.
@item <quote>
Publish the region as a blockquote. This will either be inserted
in-place or at the beginning of the document, depending on your
publishing style. It does not have a delimiting tag.
@item <ruby>
Run the @command{ruby} language interpreter on the region, replacing the
region with the result of the command.
This tag takes the ``markup'' argument. See the description of
@verb{|<command>|} for details.
@item <src>
Publish the region using htmlize.
The language to use may be specified by the ``lang'' attribute.
Muse will look for a function named @var{lang}-mode, where @var{lang} is
the value of the ``lang'' attribute.
This tag requires htmlize 1.34 or later in order to work. If this is
not satisfied, or the current publishing style is not HTML-based, Muse
will publish the region like an @verb{|<example>|} tag.
@item <verbatim>
This is used when you want to prevent Muse from trying to interpret some
markup. Surround the markup in @verb{|<verbatim>|} and
@verb{|</verbatim>|}, and it will not be interpreted.
This tag was used often in previous versions of Muse because they did
not support whole-document escaping of specials. Now, it will only be
needed for other tags, and perhaps footnotes as well.
@item <verse>
Preserve the newlines in the region. In formats like HTML, newlines are
removed by default, hence the need for this tag. In other publishing
styles, this tag may cause the text to be indented slightly in a way
that looks nice for poetry and prose.
@end table
@node Publishing Styles, Extending Muse, Markup Rules, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Publishing Various Types of Documents
@cindex publishing styles
One of the principle features of Muse is the ability to publish a simple
input text to a variety of different output styles. Muse also makes it
easy to create new styles, or derive from an existing style.
@menu
* Blosxom:: Integrating Muse and pyblosxom.cgi.
* Book:: Publishing entries into a compilation.
* DocBook:: Publishing in DocBook XML form.
* HTML:: Publishing in HTML or XHTML form.
* Journal:: Keeping a journal or blog.
* LaTeX:: Publishing LaTeX documents.
* Poem:: Publish a poem to LaTex or PDF.
* Texinfo:: Publish entries to Texinfo format or PDF.
* XML:: Publish entries to XML.
@end menu
@node Blosxom, Book, Publishing Styles, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Integrating Muse and pyblosxom.cgi
@cindex blog, one-file-per-entry style
The Blosxom publishing style publishes a tree of categorised files to a
mirrored tree of stories to be served by blosxom.cgi or pyblosxom.cgi.
In other words, each blog entry corresponds with one file.
@menu
* Blosxom Requirements:: Other tools needed for the Blosxom style.
* Blosxom Entries:: Format of a Blosxom entry and automation.
* Blosxom Options:: Blosxom styles and options provided.
@end menu
@node Blosxom Requirements, Blosxom Entries, Blosxom, Blosxom
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Other tools needed for the Blosxom style
You will need to have @command{pyblosxom.cgi} or @command{blosxom.cgi}
installed on a machine that you have upload access to.
The following additional components are required in order to make the
date of blog entries display as something sensible.
@enumerate
@item
A script to gather date directives from the entire blog tree into a
single file. The file must associate a blog entry with a date.
@item
A plugin for (py)blosxom that reads this file.
@end enumerate
These 2 things are provided for @command{pyblosxom.cgi} in the
@file{contrib/pyblosxom} subdirectory. @file{getstamps.py} provides the
former service, while @file{hardcodedates.py} provides the latter
service. Eventually it is hoped that a @command{blosxom.cgi} plugin and
script will be found/written.
Here is a sample listing from my @file{timestamps} file, which maps
each file to a date. This can really be in any format, as long as your
date-gathering script and your plugin can both understand it.
@example
2005-04-01-14-16 personal/paper_cranes
2005-03-21 personal/spring_break_over
2004-10-24 personal/finished_free_culture
@end example
The script @file{contrib/pyblosxom/make-blog} demonstrates how to call
@file{getstamps.py}. Note that you will need to set the current
directory to where your Muse files are, execute @file{getstamps.py}, and
then move the generated timestamps file to your publishing directory.
@node Blosxom Entries, Blosxom Options, Blosxom Requirements, Blosxom
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Format of a Blosxom entry and automation
Each Blosxom file must include `#date yyyy-mm-dd', or optionally the
longer `#date yyyy-mm-dd-hh-mm', a title (using the #title directive),
plus whatever normal content is desired.
The date directive is not used directly by @command{pyblosxom.cgi} or
this program. You need to have the two additional items from the former
section to make use of this feature.
There is a function called @code{muse-blosxom-new-entry} that will
automate the process of making a new blog entry. To make use of it, do
the following.
@itemize @bullet
@item
Customize @code{muse-blosxom-base-directory} to the location that your
blog entries are stored.
@item
Assign the @code{muse-blosxom-new-entry} function to a key sequence. I
use the following code to assign this function to @kbd{C-c p l'}.
@example
(global-set-key "\C-cpl" 'muse-blosxom-new-entry)
@end example
@item
You should create your directory structure ahead of time under your base
directory. These directories, which correspond with category names, may
be nested.
@item
When you enter this key sequence, you will be prompted for the category
of your entry and its title. Upon entering this information, a new file
will be created that corresponds with the title, but in lowercase
letters and having special characters converted to underscores. The
title and date directives will be inserted automatically.
@end itemize
@node Blosxom Options, , Blosxom Entries, Blosxom
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Blosxom styles and options provided
The following styles and options are available in the Blosxom publishing
style.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, blosxom-html
@item blosxom-html
Publish Blosxom entries in HTML form.
@cindex publishing styles, blosxom-xhtml
@item blosxom-xhtml
Publish Blosxom entries in XHTML form.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@item muse-blosxom-extension
Default file extension for publishing Blosxom files.
@item muse-blosxom-header
Header used for publishing Blosxom files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-blosxom-footer
Footer used for publishing Blosxom files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-blosxom-base-directory
Base directory of blog entries, used by @code{muse-blosxom-new-entry}.
This is the top-level directory where your blog entries may be found
locally.
@end table
@node Book, DocBook, Blosxom, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing entries into a compilation
This publishing style is used to output ``books'' in LaTeX or PDF
format.
Each page will become a separate chapter in the book, unless the style
keyword @option{:nochapters} is used, in which case they are all run
together as if one giant chapter.
One way of publishing a book is to make a project for it, add the
project to @code{muse-project-alist}, and use the @code{book-pdf} style
with a very specific @code{:include} value to specify some page whose
contents will be checked for the values of @code{#title} and
@code{#date}, and whose name will be used in the output file. Then to
publish the book, visit the aforementioned page and use @kbd{C-c C-t} or
@kbd{C-c C-p} to trigger the publishing process. An example
@code{muse-project-alist} for this method follows.
@example
(setq muse-project-alist
'(("MyNotes" (:nochapters t ; do automatically add chapters
:book-chapter "Computer Science"
"~/Notes/cs"
:book-chapter "Mathematics"
"~/Notes/math"
:book-chapter "Emacs"
"~/Notes/emacs"
:book-end t ; the rest will not be placed in the book
"~/Notes" ; so we can find the notes-anthology page
"~/Notes/private"
:force-publish ("index")
:default "index")
(:base "book-pdf"
:include "/notes-anthology[^/]*$"
:path "~/public_html/notes")
;; other publishing styles for each directory go here,
;; if desired
)))
@end example
In this example, there would be a file called
@file{~/Notes/notes-anthology.muse}, which would contain just the
following. The resulting book would be published to
@file{~/public_html/notes/notes-anthology.pdf}.
@example
#title My Technology Ramblings
@end example
Another way is to call the @code{muse-book-publish-project} function
manually, with a custom project entry. An example of this may be found
in John Wiegley's configuration file at
@file{examples/johnw/muse-init.el}, in the @code{muse-publish-my-books}
function.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, book-latex
@item book-latex
Publish a book in LaTeX form. The header and footer are different than
the normal LaTeX publishing mode.
@cindex publishing styles, book-pdf
@item book-pdf
Publish a book in PDF form. The header and footer are different than
the normal PDF publishing mode.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@item muse-book-before-publish-hook
A hook run in the book buffer before it is marked up.
@item muse-book-after-publish-hook
A hook run in the book buffer after it is marked up.
@item muse-book-latex-header
Header used for publishing books to LaTeX.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-book-latex-footer
Footer used for publishing books to LaTeX.
This may be text or a filename.
@end table
@node DocBook, HTML, Book, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing in DocBook XML form
This publishing style is used to generate DocBook XML files.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, docbook
@item docbook
Publish a file in Docbook form.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
This publishing style uses the same options for markup up special
characters as the ``xml'' publishing style. @xref{XML}, for details.
@table @code
@item muse-docbook-extension
Default file extension for publishing DocBook XML files.
@item muse-docbook-header
Header used for publishing DocBook XML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-docbook-footer
Footer used for publishing DocBook XML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-docbook-markup-regexps
List of markup rules for publishing a Muse page to DocBook XML.
@item muse-docbook-markup-functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
@item muse-docbook-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up text.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-docbook-encoding-default
The default Emacs buffer encoding to use in published files.
This will be used if no special characters are found.
@item muse-docbook-charset-default
The default DocBook XML charset to use if no translation is
found in @code{muse-xml-encoding-map}.
@end table
@node HTML, Journal, DocBook, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing in HTML or XHTML form
This publishing style is capable of producing HTML or XHTML documents.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, html
@item html
Supports publishing to HTML 4.0 and HTML 4.01, Strict or Transitional.
@item xhtml
Supports publishing to XHTML 1.0 and XHTML 1.1, Strict or Transitional.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
If an HTML option does not have a corresponding XHTML option, it will
be used for both of these publishing styles.
These publishing styles use the same options for markup up special
characters as the ``xml'' publishing style. @xref{XML}, for details.
@table @code
@item muse-html-extension
Default file extension for publishing HTML files.
@item muse-xhtml-extension
Default file extension for publishing XHTML files.
@item muse-html-style-sheet
Store your stylesheet definitions here.
This is used in @code{muse-html-header}. You can put raw CSS in here or
a @verb{|<link>|} tag to an external stylesheet. This text may contain
@verb{|<lisp>|} markup tags.
If you are publishing to XHTML, then customize the
@code{muse-xhtml-style-sheet} option instead.
@item muse-xhtml-style-sheet
Store your stylesheet definitions here.
This is used in @code{muse-xhtml-header}. You can put raw CSS in here
or a @verb{|<link>|} tag to an external stylesheet. This text may
contain @verb{|<lisp>|} markup tags.
@item muse-html-header
Header used for publishing HTML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-html-footer
Footer used for publishing HTML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-xhtml-header
Header used for publishing XHTML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-xhtml-footer
Footer used for publishing XHTML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-html-anchor-on-word
When true, anchors surround the closest word.
This allows you to select them in a browser (i.e. for pasting), but has
the side-effect of marking up headers in multiple colors if your header
style is different from your link style.
@item muse-html-table-attributes
The attribute to be used with HTML @verb{|<table>|} tags.
If you want to make more-complicated tables in HTML, surround the HTML
with the @verb{|literal|} tag, so that it does not get escaped.
@item muse-html-markup-regexps
List of markup rules for publishing a Muse page to HTML.
@item muse-html-markup-functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
@item muse-html-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up text as HTML.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-xhtml-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up text as XHTML.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-html-markup-tags
A list of tag specifications, for specially marking up HTML.
@xref{muse-publish-markup-tags}, for more information.
@item muse-html-meta-http-equiv
The http-equiv attribute used for the HTML @verb{|<meta>|} tag.
@item muse-html-meta-content-type
The content type used for the HTML @verb{|<meta>|} tag.
If you are striving for XHTML 1.1 compliance, you may want to change
this to ``application/xhtml+xml''.
@item muse-html-meta-content-encoding
The charset to append to the HTML @verb{|<meta>|} tag.
If set to the symbol 'detect, use @code{muse-xml-encoding-map} to try
and determine the HTML charset from emacs's coding. If set to a string,
this string will be used to force a particular charset.
@item muse-html-charset-default
The default HTML meta charset to use if no translation is found in
@code{muse-xml-encoding-map}.
@item muse-html-encoding-default
The default Emacs buffer encoding to use in published files.
This will be used if no special characters are found.
@end table
@node Journal, LaTeX, HTML, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Keeping a journal or blog
@cindex journal
@cindex blog, journal style
The module facilitates the keeping and publication of a journal. When
publishing to HTML, it assumes the form of a web log, or blog.
The input format for each entry is as follows.
@example
* 20040317: Title of entry
text for the entry.
<qotd>
"You know who you are. It comes down to a simple gut check: You
either love what you do or you don't. Period." -- P. Bronson
</qotd>
@end example
The "qotd", or Quote of the Day, is entirely optional. When generated
to HTML, this entry is rendered as the following.
@example
<div class="entry">
<div class="entry-qotd">
<h3>Quote of the Day:</h3>
<p>"You know who you are. It comes down to a simple gut
check: You either love what you do or you don't. Period."
-- P. Bronson</p>
</div>
<div class="entry-body">
<div class="entry-head">
<div class="entry-date">
<span class="date">March 17, 2004</span>
</div>
<div class="entry-title">
<h2>Title of entry</h2>
</div>
</div>
<div class="entry-text">
<p>Text for the entry.</p>
</div>
</div>
</div>
@end example
The plurality of "div" tags makes it possible to display the entries in
any form you wish, using a CSS style.
Also, an .RDF file can be generated from your journal by publishing it
with the "rdf" style. It uses the first two sentences of the first
paragraph of each entry as its "description", and auto-generates tags
for linking to the various entries.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, journal-html
@item journal-html
Publish journal entries as an HTML document.
@cindex publishing styles, journal-xhtml
@item journal-xhtml
Publish journal entries as an XHTML document.
@cindex publishing styles, journal-latex
@item journal-latex
Publish journal entries as a LaTeX document.
@cindex publishing styles, journal-pdf
@item journal-pdf
Publish journal entries as a PDF document.
@cindex publishing styles, journal-book-latex
@item journal-book-latex
Publish journal entries as a LaTeX book.
@cindex publishing styles, journal-book-pdf
@item journal-book-pdf
Publish journal entries as a PDF book.
@cindex publishing styles, journal-rdf
@cindex publishing styles, RSS 1.0
@item journal-rdf
Publish journal entries as an RDF file (RSS 1.0).
@cindex publishing styles, journal-rss
@cindex publishing styles, RSS 2.0
@item journal-rss
Publish journal entries as an RSS file (RSS 2.0).
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@item muse-journal-heading-regexp
A regexp that matches a journal heading.
Paren group 1 is the ISO date, group 2 is the optional category, and
group 3 is the optional heading for the entry.
@item muse-journal-date-format
Date format to use for journal entries.
@item muse-journal-html-heading-regexp
A regexp that matches a journal heading from an HTML document.
Paren group 1 is the ISO date, group 2 is the optional category, and
group 3 is the optional heading for the entry.
@item muse-journal-html-entry-template
Template used to publish individual journal entries as HTML.
@item muse-journal-latex-section
Template used to publish a LaTeX section.
@item muse-journal-latex-subsection
Template used to publish a LaTeX subsection.
@item muse-journal-latex-markup-tags
A list of tag specifications, for specially marking up LaTeX.
@xref{muse-publish-markup-tags}, for more information.
@item muse-journal-rdf-extension
Default file extension for publishing RDF (RSS 1.0) files.
@item muse-journal-rdf-base-url
The base URL of the website referenced by the RDF file.
@item muse-journal-rdf-header
Header used for publishing RDF (RSS 1.0) files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-journal-rdf-footer
Footer used for publishing RDF (RSS 1.0) files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-journal-rdf-date-format
Date format to use for RDF entries.
@item muse-journal-rdf-entry-template
Template used to publish individual journal entries as RDF.
@item muse-journal-rdf-summarize-entries
If non-nil, include only summaries in the RDF file, not the full data.
@item muse-journal-rss-heading-regexp
A regexp that matches a journal heading from an HTML document.
Paren group 1 is the ISO date, group 2 is the optional category,
and group 3 is the optional heading for the entry.
@item muse-journal-rss-extension
Default file extension for publishing RSS 2.0 files.
@item muse-journal-rss-base-url
The base URL of the website referenced by the RSS file.
@item muse-journal-rss-header
Header used for publishing RSS 2.0 files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-journal-rss-footer
Footer used for publishing RSS 2.0 files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-journal-rss-date-format
Date format to use for RSS 2.0 entries.
@item muse-journal-rss-entry-template
Template used to publish individual journal entries as RSS 2.0.
@item muse-journal-rss-enclosure-types-alist
File types that are accepted as RSS enclosures.
This is an alist that maps file extension to content type.
Useful for podcasting.
@item muse-journal-rss-summarize-entries
If non-nil, include only summaries in the RSS file, not the full data.
Many RSS subscribers find this annoying.
@item muse-journal-rss-markup-regexps
List of markup rules for publishing a Muse journal page to RSS.
For more information on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-regexps}.
@item muse-journal-rss-markup-functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-functions}.
@end table
@node LaTeX, Poem, Journal, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publishing LaTeX documents
This publishing style is capable of producing LaTeX or PDF documents.
If you wish to publish PDF documents, you will need to have a good TeX
installation. For Debian and Ubuntu, this can be accomplished by
installing the ``tetex-bin'' and ``tetex-extra'' packages. TeX fonts
are also a must.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, latex
@item latex
Publish a LaTeX document.
@cindex publishing styles, pdf
@item pdf
Publish a PDF document, using an external LaTeX document conversion
tool.
@cindex publishing styles, latexcjk
@item latexcjk
Publish a LaTeX document with CJK (Chinese) encodings.
@cindex publishing styles, pdfcjk
@item pdfcjk
Publish a PDF document with CJK (Chinese) encodings, using an external
LaTeX document conversion tool.
@cindex publishing styles, slides
@item slides
Publish a LaTeX document that uses the Beamer extension. This is
suitable for producing slides.
Here is an example of a slide.
@example
<slide title="First Slide">
Everything between the slide tags composes this slide.
[[Some-sort-of-cute-image.png]]
- A bullet point.
- Another bullet point.
</slide>
@end example
@cindex publishing styles, slides-pdf
@item slides-pdf
Publish a PDF document of slides, using the Beamer extension.
@cindex publishing styles, lecture-nodes
@item lecture-notes
Publish a LaTeX document that uses the Beamer extension. This is
suitable for producing lecture notes.
This can also use the @verb{|<slide>|} tag.
@cindex publishing styles, lecture-nodes-pdf
@item lecture-notes-pdf
Publish a PDF document of lecture notes, using the Beamer extension.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@item muse-latex-extension
Default file extension for publishing LaTeX files.
@item muse-latex-pdf-extension
Default file extension for publishing LaTeX files to PDF.
@item muse-latex-pdf-program
The program that is called to generate PDF content from LaTeX content.
@item muse-latex-pdf-cruft
Extensions of files to remove after generating PDF output successfully.
@item muse-latex-header
Header used for publishing LaTeX files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-latex-footer
Footer used for publishing LaTeX files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-latexcjk-header
Header used for publishing LaTeX files (CJK).
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-latexcjk-footer
Footer used for publishing LaTeX files (CJK).
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-latex-slides-header
Header for publishing of slides using LaTeX.
This may be text or a filename.
You must have the Beamer extension for LaTeX installed for this to work.
@item muse-latex-lecture-notes-header
Header publishing of lecture notes using LaTeX.
This may be text or a filename.
You must have the Beamer extension for LaTeX installed for this to work.
@item muse-latex-markup-regexps
List of markup regexps for identifying regions in a Muse page.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-regexps}.
@item muse-latex-markup-functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-functions}.
@item muse-latex-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up text.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-latex-slides-markup-tags
A list of tag specifications, for specially marking up LaTeX slides.
@item muse-latexcjk-encoding-map
An alist mapping emacs coding systems to appropriate CJK codings.
Use the base name of the coding system (ie, without the -unix).
@item muse-latexcjk-encoding-default
The default Emacs buffer encoding to use in published files.
This will be used if no special characters are found.
@item muse-latex-markup-specials-document
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
These are applied to the entire document, sans already-escaped
regions.
@item muse-latex-markup-specials-example
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
These are applied to @verb{|example>|} regions.
With the default interpretation of @verb{|<example>|} regions, no
specials need to be escaped.
@item muse-latex-markup-specials-literal
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
This applies to =monospaced text= and @verb{|<code>|} regions.
@item muse-latex-markup-specials-url
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
These are applied to URLs.
@item muse-latex-markup-specials-image
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
These are applied to image filenames.
@item muse-latex-permit-contents-tag
If nil, ignore @verb{|<contents>|} tags. Otherwise, insert table of
contents.
Most of the time, it is best to have a table of contents on the
first page, with a new page immediately following. To make this
work with documents published in both HTML and LaTeX, we need to
ignore the @verb{|<contents>|} tag.
If you don't agree with this, then set this option to non-nil,
and it will do what you expect.
@end table
@node Poem, Texinfo, LaTeX, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publish a poem to LaTex or PDF
The @code{muse-poem} module makes it easy to attractively publish and
reference poems in the following format, using the "memoir" module for
LaTeX publishing. It will also markup poems for every other output
style, though none are nearly as pretty.
@example
Title
Body of poem
Annotations, history, notes, etc.
@end example
Once a poem is written in this format, just publish it to PDF using the
@code{poem-pdf} style. To make an inlined reference to a poem that
you've written -- for example, from a blog page -- there is a "poem" tag
defined by this module.
@example
<poem title="name.of.poem.page">
@end example
Let's assume the template above was called @file{name.of.poem.page};
then the above tag would result in this inclusion.
@example
** Title
> Body of poem
@end example
John Wiegley uses this module for publishing all of the poems on his
website, which are at
@uref{http://www.newartisans.com/johnw/poems.html}.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, poem-latex
@item poem-latex
Publish a poem in LaTeX form.
@cindex publishing styles, poem-pdf
@item poem-pdf
Publish a poem to a PDF document.
@cindex publishing styles, chapbook-latex
@item chapbook-latex
Publish a book of poems in LaTeX form.
@cindex publishing styles, chapbook-pdf
@item chapbook-pdf
Publish a book of poems to a PDF document.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@item muse-poem-latex-header
Header used for publishing LaTeX poems.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-poem-latex-footer
Footer used for publishing LaTeX files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-poem-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up poems.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-chapbook-latex-header
Header used for publishing a book of poems in LaTeX form.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-chapbook-latex-footer
Footer used for publishing a book of poems in LaTeX form.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-poem-chapbook-strings
Strings used for marking up books of poems.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@end table
@node Texinfo, XML, Poem, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publish entries to Texinfo format or PDF
Rules for publishing a Muse file as a Texinfo article.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, texi
@item texi
Publish a file in Texinfo form.
@cindex publishing styles, texi
@item info
Generate an Info file from a Muse file.
@cindex publishing styles, info-pdf
@item info-pdf
Publish a file in PDF form.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@item muse-texinfo-process-natively
If non-nil, use the Emacs `texinfmt' module to make Info files.
@item muse-texinfo-extension
Default file extension for publishing Texinfo files.
@item muse-texinfo-info-extension
Default file extension for publishing Info files.
@item muse-texinfo-pdf-extension
Default file extension for publishing PDF files.
@item muse-texinfo-header
Text to prepend to a Muse page being published as Texinfo.
This may be text or a filename.
It may contain @verb{|<lisp>|} markup tags.
@item muse-texinfo-footer
Text to append to a Muse page being published as Texinfo.
This may be text or a filename.
It may contain @verb{|<lisp>|} markup tags.
@item muse-texinfo-markup-regexps
List of markup rules for publishing a Muse page to Texinfo.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-regexps}.
@item muse-texinfo-markup-functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-functions}.
@item muse-texinfo-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up text.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-texinfo-markup-specials
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
@item muse-texinfo-markup-specials
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
These are applied to URLs.
@end table
@node XML, , Texinfo, Publishing Styles
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Publish entries to XML
Muse is capable of publishing XML documents, with the help of the
@file{muse-xml.el} module.
A RelaxNG schema is available as part of the Muse distribution in the
@file{etc/muse.rnc} file.
@subheading Styles provided
@table @code
@cindex publishing styles, xml
@item xml
Publish a file in XML form.
@end table
@subheading Options provided
@table @code
@cindex muse-xml-encoding-map
@item muse-xml-encoding-map
An alist mapping Emacs coding systems to appropriate XML charsets.
Use the base name of the coding system (i.e. without the -unix).
@item muse-xml-markup-specials
A table of characters which must be represented specially in all
XML-like markup formats.
@item muse-xml-markup-specials-url-extra
A table of characters which must be represented specially in all
XML-like markup formats.
These are extra characters that are escaped within URLs.
@item muse-xml-extension
Default file extension used for publishing XML files.
@item muse-xml-header
Header used for publishing XML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-xml-footer
Footer used for publishing XML files.
This may be text or a filename.
@item muse-xml-markup-regexps
List of markup rules for publishing a Muse page to XML.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-regexps}.
@item muse-xml-markup-functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
For more on the structure of this list,
@xref{muse-publish-markup-functions}.
@item muse-xml-markup-strings
Strings used for marking up text.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item muse-xml-encoding-default
The default Emacs buffer encoding to use in published files.
This will be used if no special characters are found.
@item muse-xml-charset-default
The default XML charset to use if no translation is found in
@code{muse-xml-encoding-map}.
@end table
@node Extending Muse, Getting Help and Reporting Bugs, Publishing Styles, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Making your own publishing styles
@menu
* Common Elements:: Common functionality shared by styles.
* Deriving Styles:: Deriving a new style from an existing
one.
@end menu
@node Common Elements, Deriving Styles, , Extending Muse
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Common functionality shared by styles
@cindex publishing styles, common
@menu
* Markup Functions:: Specifying functions to mark up text.
* Markup Regexps:: Markup rules for publishing.
* Markup Strings:: Strings specific to a publishing style.
* Markup Tags:: Tag specifications for special markup.
* Style Elements:: Parameters used for defining styles.
@end menu
@node Markup Functions, Markup Regexps, , Common Elements
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Specifying functions to mark up text
@cindex publishing, markup functions
@anchor{muse-publish-markup-functions}
@code{muse-publish-markup-functions}
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
This is used by publishing styles to attempt to minimize the amount of
custom regexps that each has to define. @file{muse-publish} provides
rules for the most common types of markup.
Each member of the list is of the following form.
@example
(SYMBOL FUNCTION)
@end example
@itemize @bullet
@item SYMBOL
Describes the type of text to associate with this rule.
@code{muse-publish-markup-regexps} maps regexps to these symbols.
@item FUNCTION
Function to use to mark up this kind of rule if no suitable function is
found through the @option{:functions} tag of the current style.
@end itemize
@node Markup Regexps, Markup Strings, Markup Functions, Common Elements
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Markup rules for publishing
@cindex publishing, markup regexps
@cindex publishing, rules
@anchor{muse-publish-markup-regexps}
@code{muse-publish-markup-regexps}
List of markup rules for publishing a page with Muse.
The rules given in this variable are invoked first, followed by whatever
rules are specified by the current style.
Each member of the list is either a function, or a list of the following
form.
@example
(REGEXP/SYMBOL TEXT-BEGIN-GROUP REPLACEMENT-TEXT/FUNCTION/SYMBOL)
@end example
@itemize @bullet
@item REGEXP
A regular expression, or symbol whose value is a regular expression,
which is searched for using `re-search-forward'.
@item TEXT-BEGIN-GROUP
The matching group within that regexp which denotes the beginning of the
actual text to be marked up.
@item REPLACEMENT-TEXT
A string that will be passed to `replace-match'.
If it is not a string, but a function, it will be called to determine
what the replacement text should be (it must return a string). If it is
a symbol, the value of that symbol should be a string.
@end itemize
The replacements are done in order, one rule at a time. Writing
the regular expressions can be a tricky business. Note that case
is never ignored. `case-fold-search' is always bound to nil
while processing the markup rules.
@subheading Publishing order
This is the order that the publishing rules are consulted, by default.
This may be changed by customizing @code{muse-publish-markup-regexps}.
@table @code
@item trailing and leading whitespace
Remove trailing and leading whitespace from a file.
@item directive
@samp{#directive}
This is only recognized at the beginning of a file.
@item comment
@samp{; a commented line}
@item tag
@samp{<tag>}
@item comment
@samp{; comment}
@item explicit links
Prevent emphasis characters in explicit links from being marked up.
Don't actually publish them here, just add a special no-emphasis text
property.
@item word
Whitespace-delimited word, possibly with emphasis characters
This function is responsible for marking up emphasis and escaping some
specials.
@item heading
@samp{** Heading}
Outline-mode style headings.
@item enddots
@samp{....}
These are ellipses with a dot at end.
@item dots
@samp{...}
Ellipses.
@item rule
@samp{----}
Horizontal rule or section separator.
@item no-break-space
@samp{~~}
Prevent lines from being split before or after these characters.
@item fn-sep
@samp{Footnotes:}
beginning of footnotes section
@item footnote
@samp{[1]}
Footnote definition or reference. If at beginning of line, it is a
definition.
@item list
@itemize @bullet
@item
@samp{ 1. }
@item
@samp{ - }
@item
@samp{term :: }
@end itemize
Numbered list, item list, or term definition list.
@item table-el
@file{table.el} style tables
@item table
@samp{table | cells}
Muse tables or orgtbl-mode style tables.
@item quote
spaces before beginning of text
Blockquotes.
@item emdash
@samp{--}
2-wide dash
@item verse
@samp{> verse text}
@item anchor
@samp{#anchor}
@item link
@samp{[[explicit][links]]}
@item url
@samp{http://example.com/}
@item email
@samp{bare-email@@example.com}
@end table
@node Markup Strings, Markup Tags, Markup Regexps, Common Elements
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Strings specific to a publishing style
@cindex publishing, markup strings
@dfn{Markup strings} are strings used for marking up text for a
particular style.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@subheading Available markup strings
@table @code
@item image-with-desc
An image and a description.
Argument 1: image without extension. Argument 2: image extension.
Argument 3: description.
@item image
An inlined image.
Argument 1: image without extension. Argument 2: image extension.
@item image-link
An image with a link around it.
Argument 1: link. Argument 2: image without extension.
Argument 3: image extension.
@item anchor-ref
A reference to an anchor on the current page.
Argument 1: anchor name. Argument 2: description if one exists, or the
original link otherwise.
@item url
A URL without a description.
Argument 1: URL.
@item link
A link to a Muse page with a description.
Argument 1: link. Argument 2: description if one exists, or the
original link otherwise.
@item link-and-anchor
A link to a Muse page with an anchor, and a description.
Argument 1: link. Argument 2: anchor name.
Argument 3: description if one exists, or the original link otherwise.
Argument 4: link without an extension.
@item email-addr
A link to an email address.
Argument 1: email address. Argument 2: email address.
@item anchor
An anchor.
Argument 1: name of anchor.
@item emdash
A 2-length dash.
Argument 1: Initial whitespace. Argument 2: Terminating whitespace.
@item comment-begin
Beginning of a comment.
@item comment-end
End of a comment.
@item rule
A horizontal line or space.
@item no-break-space
A space that separates two words which are not to be separated.
@item footnote
Beginning of footnote.
@item footnote-end
End of footnote.
@item footnotemark
Mark a reference for the current footnote.
Argument 1: number of this footnote.
@item footnotemark-end
End of a reference for the current footnote.
@item footnotetext
Indicate the text of the current footnote.
Argument 1: number of this footnote.
@item footnotetext-end
End of a footnote text line.
@item fn-sep
Text used to replace ``Footnotes:'' line.
@item dots
3 dots.
@item enddots
4 dots.
@item part
Beginning of a part indicator line. This is used by book publishing.
@item part-end
End of a part indicator line. This is used by book publishing.
@item chapter
Beginning of a chapter indicator line. This is used by book publishing.
@item chapter-end
End of a chapter indicator line. This is used by book publishing.
@item section
Beginning of level 1 section indicator line.
Argument 1: level of section; always 1.
@item section-end
End of level 1 section indicator line.
Argument 1: level of section; always 1.
@item subsection
Beginning of level 2 section indicator line.
Argument 1: level of section; always 2.
@item subsection-end
End of level 2 section indicator line.
Argument 1: level of section; always 2.
@item subsubsection
Beginning of level 3 section indicator line.
Argument 1: level of section; always 3.
@item subsubsection-end
End of level 3 section indicator line.
Argument 1: level of section; always 3.
@item section-other
Beginning of section indicator line, where level is greater than 3.
Argument 1: level of section.
@item section-other-end
End of section indicator line, where level is greater than 3.
Argument 1: level of section.
@item begin-underline
Beginning of underlined text.
@item end-underline
End of underlined text.
@item begin-literal
Beginning of verbatim text. This includes @verb{|<code>|} tags and
=teletype text=.
@item end-literal
End of verbatim text. This includes @verb{|<code>|} tags and =teletype
text=.
@item begin-emph
Beginning of the first level of emphasized text.
@item end-emph
End of the first level of emphasized text.
@item begin-more-emph
Beginning of the second level of emphasized text.
@item end-more-emph
End of the second level of emphasized text.
@item begin-most-emph
Beginning of the third (and final) level of emphasized text.
@item end-most-emph
End of the third (and final) level of emphasized text.
@item begin-verse
Beginning of verse text.
@item verse-space
String used to each space that is further indented than the beginning of
the verse.
@item begin-verse-line
Beginning of a line of verse.
@item empty-verse-line
End of a line of verse.
@item begin-last-stanza-line
Beginning of the last line of a verse stanza.
@item end-last-stanza-line
End of the last line of a verse stanza.
@item end-verse
End of verse text.
@item begin-example
Beginning of an example region. To make use of this, an
@samp{<example>} tag is needed.
@item end-example
End of an example region. To make use of this, an @samp{</example>} tag
is needed.
@item begin-center
Begin a centered line.
@item end-center
End a centered line.
@item begin-quote
Begin a quoted region.
@item end-quote
End a quoted region.
@item begin-quote-item
Begin a quote paragraph.
@item end-quote-item
End a quote paragraph.
@item begin-uli
Begin an unordered list.
@item end-uli
End an unordered list.
@item begin-uli-item
Begin an unordered list item.
@item end-uli-item
End an unordered list item.
@item begin-oli
Begin an ordered list.
@item end-oli
End an ordered list.
@item begin-oli-item
Begin an ordered list item.
@item end-oli-item
End an ordered list item.
@item begin-dl
Begin a definition list.
@item end-dl
End a definition list.
@item begin-dl-item
Begin a definition list item.
@item end-dl-item
End a definition list item.
@item begin-ddt
Begin a definition list term.
@item end-ddt
End a definition list term.
@item begin-dde
Begin a definition list entry.
@item end-dde
End a definition list entry.
@item begin-table
Begin a table.
@item end-table
End a table.
@item begin-table-group
Begin a table grouping.
@item end-table-group
End a table grouping.
@item begin-table-row
Begin a table row.
@item end-table-row
End a table row.
@item begin-table-entry
Begin a table entry.
@item end-table-entry
End a table entry.
@end table
@node Markup Tags, Style Elements, Markup Strings, Common Elements
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Tag specifications for special markup
@cindex publishing, markup tags
@anchor{muse-publish-markup-tags}
@code{muse-publish-markup-tags}
A list of tag specifications, for specially marking up text.
XML-style tags are the best way to add custom markup to Muse. This is
easily accomplished by customizing this list of markup tags.
For each entry, the name of the tag is given, whether it expects a
closing tag and/or an optional set of attributes, whether it is
nestable, and a function that performs whatever action is desired within
the delimited region.
The tags themselves are deleted during publishing, before the function
is called. The function is called with three arguments, the beginning
and end of the region surrounded by the tags. If properties are
allowed, they are passed as a third argument in the form of an alist.
The `end' argument to the function is always a marker.
Point is always at the beginning of the region within the tags, when the
function is called. Wherever point is when the function finishes is
where tag markup will resume.
These tag rules are processed once at the beginning of markup, and once
at the end, to catch any tags which may have been inserted in-between.
@node Style Elements, , Markup Tags, Common Elements
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@subsection Parameters used for defining styles
@cindex publishing, style elements
Style elements are tags that define a style. Use
@code{muse-define-style} to create a new style.
@example
(muse-define-style DERIVED-NAME BASE-NAME STYLE-PARAMETERS)
@end example
@subheading Usable elements
@table @option
@item :suffix
File extension to use for publishing files with this style.
@item :link-suffix
File extension to use for publishing links to Muse files with this
style.
@item :osuffix
File extension to use for publishing second-stage files with this style.
For example, PDF publishing generates a LaTeX file first, then a PDF
from that LaTeX file.
@item :regexps
List of markup rules for publishing a page with Muse.
@xref{muse-publish-markup-regexps}.
@item :functions
An alist of style types to custom functions for that kind of text.
@xref{muse-publish-markup-functions}.
@item :strings
Strings used for marking up text with this style.
These cover the most basic kinds of markup, the handling of which
differs little between the various styles.
@item :tags
A list of tag specifications, used for handling extra tags.
@xref{muse-publish-markup-tags}.
@item :specials
A table of characters which must be represented specially.
@item :before
A function that is to be executed on the newly-created publishing buffer
(or the current region) before any publishing occurs.
This is used to set extra parameters that direct the publishing process.
@item :before-end
A function that is to be executed on the publishing buffer (or the
current region) immediately after applying all of the markup regexps.
This is used to fix the order of table elements (header, footer, body)
in XML-ish styles.
@item :after
A function that is to be executed on the publishing buffer after
:before-end, and immediately after inserting the header and footer.
This is used for generating the table of contents as well as setting the
file coding system.
@item :final
A function that is to be executed after saving the published file, but
while still in its buffer.
This is used for generating second-stage documents like PDF files from
just-published LaTeX files.
@item :header
Header used for publishing files of this style.
This may be a variable, text, or a filename. It is inserted at the
beginning of a file, after evaluating the publishing markup.
@item :footer
Footer used for publishing files of this style.
This may be a variable, text, or a filename. It is inserted at the end
of a file, after evaluating the publishing markup.
@item :style-sheet
Style sheet used for publishing files of this style.
This may be a variable or text. It is used in the header of HTML and
XHTML based publishing styles.
@item :browser
The function used to browse the published result of files of this style.
@end table
@node Deriving Styles, , Common Elements, Extending Muse
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section Deriving a new style from an existing one
@cindex publishing styles, deriving
To create a new style from an existing one, use @code{muse-derive-style}
as follows. This is a good way to fix something you don't like about a
particular publishing style, or to personalize it.
@example
(muse-derive-style DERIVED-NAME BASE-NAME STYLE-PARAMETERS)
@end example
The derived name is a string defining the new style, such as "my-html".
The base name must identify an existing style, such as "html" -- if you
have loaded @file{muse-html}. The style parameters are the same as
those used to create a style, except that they override whatever
definitions exist in the base style. However, some definitions only
partially override. The following parameters support partial
overriding.
@xref{Style Elements}, for a complete list of all parameters.
@table @option
@item :functions
If a markup function is not found in the derived style's function list,
the base style's function list will be queried.
@item :regexps
All regexps in the current style and the base style(s) will be used.
@item :strings
If a markup string is not found in the derived style's string list, the
base style's string list will be queried.
@end table
@node Getting Help and Reporting Bugs, History, Extending Muse, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Getting Help and Reporting Bugs
@cindex help, getting
@cindex bugs, reporting
After you have read this guide, if you still have questions about
Muse, or if you have bugs to report, there are several places you can
go.
@itemize @bullet
@item
@uref{http://www.emacswiki.org/cgi-bin/wiki/EmacsMuse} is the
emacswiki.org page, and anyone may add tips, hints, or bug descriptions
to it.
@item
@uref{http://mwolson.org/projects/EmacsMuse.html} is the web page
that Michael Olson (the current maintainer) made for Muse.
@item
Muse has several different mailing lists.
@table @samp
@item muse-el-announce
Low-traffic list for Muse-related announcements.
You can join this mailing list (@email{muse-el-announce@@gna.org})
using the subscription form at
@url{http://mail.gna.org/listinfo/muse-el-announce/}. This
mailing list is also available via Gmane (@url{http://gmane.org/}). The
group is called @samp{gmane.emacs.muse.announce}.
@item muse-el-discuss
Discussion, bugfixes, suggestions, tips, and the like for Muse.
This mailing list also includes the content of muse-el-announce.
You can join this mailing list (@email{muse-el-discuss@@gna.org})
using the subscription form at
@url{http://mail.gna.org/listinfo/muse-el-discuss/}. This mailing
list is also available via Gmane with the identifier
@samp{gmane.emacs.muse.general}.
@item muse-el-logs
Log messages for commits made to Muse.
You can join this mailing list (@email{muse-el-logs@@gna.org}) using
the subscription form at
@url{http://mail.gna.org/listinfo/muse-el-logs/}. This mailing list
is also available via Gmane with the identifier
@samp{gmane.emacs.muse.scm}.
@item muse-el-commits
Generated bug reports for Emacs Muse. If you use our bug-tracker at
@url{https://gna.org/bugs/?group=muse-el}, the bug reports will be
sent to this list automatically.
You can join this mailing list (@email{muse-el-commits@@gna.org}) using
the subscription form at
@url{http://mail.gna.org/listinfo/muse-el-commits/}. This mailing list
is also available via Gmane with the identifier
@samp{gmane.emacs.muse.cvs}.
@item muse-el-internationalization
Discussion of translation of the Muse website and documentation into
many languages.
You can join this mailing list
(@email{muse-el-internationalization@@gna.org}) using the subscription
form at @url{http://mail.gna.org/listinfo/internationalization/}. This
mailing list is also available via Gmane with the identifier
@samp{gmane.emacs.muse.internationalization}.
@end table
@item
You can visit the IRC Freenode channel @samp{#emacs}. Many of the
contributors are frequently around and willing to answer your
questions. The @samp{#muse} channel is also available for
Muse-specific help, and its current maintainer hangs out there.
@item
The maintainer of Emacs Muse, Michael Olson, may be contacted at
@email{mwolson@@gnu.org}. He can be rather slow at answering email, so
it is often better to use the muse-el-discuss mailing list.
@end itemize
@node History, Contributors, Getting Help and Reporting Bugs, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter History of This Document
@cindex history, of Muse
@itemize
@item 2004
John Wiegley started Muse upon realizing that EmacsWiki had some serious
limitations. Around February 2004, he started making "emacs-wiki version
3.00 APLHA", which eventually became known as Muse.
Most of those who frequent the emacs-wiki mailing list continued to use
emacs-wiki, mainly because Planner hasn't been ported over to it.
As of 2004-12-01, Michael Olson became the maintainer of Muse, as per
John Wiegley's request.
@item 2005
Michael Olson overhauled this document and added many new sections in
preparation for the first release of Muse (3.01).
@end itemize
@node Contributors, GNU Free Documentation License, History, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@chapter Contributors to This Documentation
@cindex contributors
The first draft of this document was taken from the emacs-wiki texinfo
manual. Michael Olson adapted it for Muse and added most of its
content.
John Sullivan did a majority of the work on the emacs-wiki texinfo
manual.
While Sacha Chua maintained emacs-wiki, she worked quite a bit on the
emacs-wiki texinfo manual.
@include doclicense.texi
@node Concept Index, , GNU Free Documentation License, Top
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@unnumbered Index
@printindex cp
@bye
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