JavaScript
Latest commit 765acfa Dec 13, 2017 @amsul amsul Merge pull request #5 from amsul/fix-file-names
Fix file names

README.md

react-translated

A dead simple way to add complex translations in a React project 🌎🌍🌏

Features

  • πŸ’₯ Data interpolation
  • β˜„ Component interpolation
  • β“‚ Markdown inline-manipulations
  • πŸ”€ Custom manipulations, pluralizations, and grammar rules based on input-data
  • βš› Component-level translation files (enables loading only required translations)

Example

Write this:

<Translate
  text='{difficulty} *translations* in React <ReactLogo>'
  data={{ difficulty: 'Simple' }}
  renderMap={{
    renderReactLogo: () => <ReactLogo size={14} />,
  }}
  />

To render this:

Support

React DOM and React Native πŸ”₯

Try

Play around with the library in your browser through the CodeSandbox.


Table of Contents


Installation

Whatever floats your boat:

  • Yarn: yarn add react-translated
  • npm: npm install react-translated

Setup

Step 1: Create the translations file

Create a file that will contain a mapping of keys to the string in each language you support.

To keep things simple, use the strings of your default language as the key:

// translation.js

export default {
  'Hi, World!': {
    en: 'Hi, World!',
    fr: 'Bonjour le monde!',
  },
  // ...
}

NOTE: There is no enforcement on the key used for a language. In these examples, 2-digit country codes (en, fr, etc) are used. Decide on a convention and use that for all translations.

Step 2: Connect the Provider

Wrap your top-level component with the <Provider> and set the translation and language props:

// index.js

import { Provider } from 'react-translated'
import translation from './translation'
const App = (
  <Provider language='en' translation={translation}>
    <MyApplicationRoot />
  </Provider>
)

NOTE: The value of the language prop must be one of the keys used for a language defined in Step 1.

Step 3: Start translating

That is all!

Continue reading below to see how to handle the various translation scenarios.


Usage

The library can be imported in whatever way you find suitable:

import ReactTranslated from 'react-translated'
import * as ReactTranslated from 'react-translated'

<ReactTranslated.Translate /*...*/ />

Or:

import { Provider, Translate } from 'react-translated'

<Translate /*...*/ />

Static text

This is pretty self-explanatory:

// translation.js
export default {
  'Hi, World!': {
    en: 'Hi, World!',
    fr: 'Bonjour le monde!',
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate text='Hi, World!' />

Renders as:

Templated text

To use dynamic text, the text can be templated:

// translation.js
export default {
  'Hi, {firstName}!': {
    en: 'Hi, {firstName}!',
    fr: 'Salut {firstName}!',
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate
  text='Hi, {firstName}!'
  data={{ firstName: 'Sergey' }}
  />

Renders as:

Dynamically templated text

Sometimes just dynamic text is not enough and the template itself needs to be dynamic (for example pluralization). That can be achieved using a function call:

// translation.js
export default {
  'There are {catsCount} cats in this room.': {
    en({ catsCount }) {
      if (catsCount === 1) {
        return 'There is {catsCount} cat in this room.'
      }
      return 'There are {catsCount} cats in this room.'
    },
    // ...
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate
  text='There are {catsCount} cats in this room.'
  data={{ catsCount: 2 }}
  />
<Translate
  text='There are {catsCount} cats in this room.'
  data={{ catsCount: 1 }}
  />

Renders as:

Since these templates are simple function calls, things more complex than pluralization can be done too:

// translation.js
export default {
  'This is a {fruit}': {
    en({ fruit }) {
      if (/^[aeiou]/.test(fruit)) {
        return 'This is an {fruit}'
      }
      return 'This is a {fruit}'
    },
    // ...
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate
  text='This is a {fruit}'
  data={{ fruit: 'banana' }}
  />
<Translate
  text='This is a {fruit}'
  data={{ fruit: 'apple' }}
  />

Renders as:

Styled text

The translated text can also have some basic styling applied:

// translation.js
export default {
  'Hi, *World*!': {
    en: 'Hi, *World*!',
    fr: 'Bonjour *le monde*!',
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate text='Hi, *World*!' />

Renders as:

And of course the same can be done with dynamic templates:

// translation.js
export default {
  'Hi, *{firstName}*!': {
    en: 'Hi, *{firstName}*!',
    fr: 'Salut *{firstName}*!',
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate
  text='Hi, *{firstName}*!'
  data={{ firstName: 'Sergey' }}
  />

Renders as:

Component within text

For more advanced uses where Markdown and Emojis don’t suffice, components can be rendered within the text:

// translation.js
export default {
  'Tap the <StarIcon> to add': {
    en: 'Tap the <StarIcon> to add',
    fr: 'Appuyez sur la <StarIcon> pour ajouter',
  },
}

// any component file
<Translate
  text='Tap the <StarIcon> to add!'
  renderMap={{
    renderStarIcon: () => <StarIcon size={14} />
  }}
  />

Renders as:

Another practical application of this is nested translations - text that requires data that also needs to be translated:

// translation.js
export default {
  'I was born in <MonthName>': {
    en: 'I was born in <MonthName>',
    fr: 'Je suis nΓ© en <MonthName>',
  },
  'August': {
    en: 'August',
    fr: 'aoΓ»t',
  },
}

// any component file
const monthName = 'August'
<Translate
  text='I was born in <MonthName>'
  renderMap={{
    renderMonthName: () => <Translate text={monthName} />
  }}
  />

Renders as:


Contributors


amsul

πŸ’» 🎨 πŸ“– πŸ’‘ πŸ”§

πŸ‘‹ Interested becoming a contributor too?

Awesome! This project follows the all-contributors specification. Contributions of any kind are welcome!

You may also want to take a look at our TODOs below and make sure to give our Contributing guide a read.


TODOs

  • Add tests using Jest

License

Licensed under MIT.

Β© 2017 Amsul