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🍦 i18n`literally` - A simple way to introduce internationalization to your JS
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README.md

i18n-literally

A simple way to introduce internationalization to your JS.

npm version Build Status

Install

$ npm install i18n-literally

Usage

import i18n from 'i18n-literally';
import db from './i18n.db.json';

// Set the database
i18n.db = db;

// 1. Write in the default language
i18n`Hello ${'World'}!`
// => Hello World!

// 2. Add/update your translations for a language
"$ npx i18n-literally index.js es"

// 3. Get translations based on locale
i18n.locale = 'es';
i18n`Hello ${'World'}!`
// => Hola World!

Write your entire application in the default language, and support multiple versions of the language by simply changing the i18n.locale. To Add/update translations simply run the cli.

API

i18n`template`

Returns a string based on the locale (default "en").

i18n.locale

Type: string
Default: en

i18n.db

Type: object
Default: {}

CLI

The cli helps you to easily maintain your translations in a simple web app.
All translations are stored in a i18n.db.json file.

$ npx i18n-literally --help

  Usage:
    $ literally <entry> <locale> [db]

  Arguments:
    <entry>     The entry file of your app
    <locale>    Locale to add/update translations for
    [db]        Database file defaults to "./i18n.db.json"

  Options:
    --help      Show information
    --version   Show current version

  Example:
    $ literally ./index.js es

The cli web app to add/update translations. alt text

Related

Inspired by this post from Andrea Giammarchi.

License

MIT © André Ruffert

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