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Testing and fixing

Change-Id: Icbdb206a0091f7b13f281c3d4e38e4fbb5fbacca
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1 parent 223e18d commit baf51dffe8c162c73b7173438795ed9841958bec annegentle committed Dec 9, 2011
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88 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-compute-admin/compute-starting-images.xml
@@ -0,0 +1,88 @@
+<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
+<section xml:id="starting-images"
+ xmlns="http://docbook.org/ns/docbook"
+ xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"
+ xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" version="5.0">
+ <title>Starting Images</title>
+ <para>Once you have an installation, you want to get images that you can use in your Compute cloud.
+ We've created a basic Ubuntu image for testing your installation. First you'll download
+ the image, then use "uec-publish-tarball" to publish it:</para>
+
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">image="ubuntu1010-UEC-localuser-image.tar.gz"
+wget http://c0179148.cdn1.cloudfiles.rackspacecloud.com/ubuntu1010-UEC-localuser-image.tar.gz
+tar xvfz $image </literallayout>
+ <para>In return you should see this listing.</para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">maverick-server-uec-amd64-floppy
+maverick-server-uec-amd64.img
+maverick-server-uec-amd64-loader
+maverick-server-uec-amd64-vmlinuz-virtual</literallayout>
+
+
+
+ <para>Next you can use glance-upload commands to upload the image to the Image Service.</para>
+
+ <para><literallayout class="monospaced">uec-publish-tarball ubuntu1010-UEC-localuser-image.tar.gz dub-bucket amd64</literallayout></para>
+
+ <para>The command in return should output three references:<emphasis role="italic">
+ emi</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">eri</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic"
+ >eki</emphasis>. You will next run nova image-list in order to obtain the ID of the
+ image you just uploaded.</para>
+
+
+ <para>Now you can schedule, launch and connect to the instance, which you do with the "nova"
+ command line. The ID of the image will be used with the <literallayout class="monospaced">nova boot</literallayout>command.</para>
+ <para>One thing to note here, once you publish the tarball, it has
+ to untar before you can launch an image from it. Using the
+ 'nova list' command, and make sure the image has its status as
+ "ACTIVE".</para>
+
+ <para><literallayout class="monospaced">nova image-list</literallayout></para>
+
+ <para>Depending on the image that you're using, you need a public key to connect to it. Some
+ images have built-in accounts already created. Images can be shared by many users, so it
+ is dangerous to put passwords into the images. Nova therefore supports injecting ssh
+ keys into instances before they are booted. This allows a user to login to the instances
+ that he or she creates securely. Generally the first thing that a user does when using
+ the system is create a keypair. </para>
+ <para>Keypairs provide secure authentication to your instances. As part of the first boot of
+ a virtual image, the private key of your keypair is added to root’s authorized_keys
+ file. Nova generates a public and private key pair, and sends the private key to the
+ user. The public key is stored so that it can be injected into instances. </para>
+ <para>Keypairs are created through the api and you use them as a parameter when launching an
+ instance. They can be created on the command line using the following command :
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">nova keypair-add</literallayout>In order to list all the available options, you would run :<literallayout class="monospaced">nova help </literallayout>
+ Example usage:</para>
+
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">
+nova keypair-add test > test.pem
+chmod 600 test.pem
+ </literallayout>
+
+ <para>Now, you can run the instances:</para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">nova boot --image 1 --flavor 1 --key_name test my-first-server</literallayout>
+ <para>Here's a description of the parameters used above:</para>
+ <itemizedlist>
+ <listitem>
+ <para><emphasis role="bold">--flavor</emphasis> what type of image to create. You
+ can get all the flavors you have by running
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">nova flavor-list</literallayout></para>
+ </listitem>
+ <listitem>
+ <para>
+ <emphasis role="bold">-key_ name</emphasis> name of the key to inject in to the
+ image at launch. </para>
+ </listitem>
+ </itemizedlist>
+ <para> The instance will go from “BUILD” to “ACTIVE” in a short time, and you should
+ be able to connect via SSH using the 'ubuntu' account, with the password 'ubuntu':
+ (replace $ipaddress with the one you got from nova list): </para>
+ <para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">ssh ubuntu@$ipaddress</literallayout></para>
+ <para>The 'ubuntu' user is part of the sudoers group, so you can escalate to 'root'
+ via the following command:</para>
+ <para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">
+ sudo -i
+ </literallayout>
+ </para>
+</section>
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96 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-compute-admin/computeadmin.xml
@@ -78,101 +78,7 @@ format="SVG" scale="60"/>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
- <section xml:id="starting-images">
- <title>Starting Images</title><para>Once you have an installation, you want to get images that you can use in your Compute cloud.
- We've created a basic Ubuntu image for testing your installation. First you'll download
- the image, then use "uec-publish-tarball" to publish it:</para>
-
- <para><literallayout class="monospaced">
-image="ubuntu1010-UEC-localuser-image.tar.gz"
-wget http://c0179148.cdn1.cloudfiles.rackspacecloud.com/ubuntu1010-UEC-localuser-image.tar.gz
-uec-publish-tarball $image [bucket-name] [hardware-arch]
- </literallayout>
- <itemizedlist>
- <listitem>
- <para>
- <emphasis role="bold">Image</emphasis> : a tar.gz file that contains the
- system, its kernel and ramdisk. </para>
- </listitem>
- <listitem>
- <para>
- <emphasis role="bold">Bucket</emphasis> : a local repository that contains
- images. </para>
- </listitem>
- <listitem>
- <para>
- <emphasis role="bold">Hardware architecture</emphasis> : specify via "amd64"
- or "i386" the image's architecture (32 or 64 bits). </para>
- </listitem>
- </itemizedlist>
- </para>
-
- <para>Here's an example of what this command looks like with data:</para>
-
- <para><literallayout class="monospaced">uec-publish-tarball ubuntu1010-UEC-localuser-image.tar.gz dub-bucket amd64</literallayout></para>
-
- <para>The command in return should output three references:<emphasis role="italic">
- emi</emphasis>, <emphasis role="italic">eri</emphasis> and <emphasis role="italic"
- >eki</emphasis>. You will next run nova image-list in order to obtain the ID of the
- image you just uploaded.</para>
-
-
- <para>Now you can schedule, launch and connect to the instance, which you do with the "nova"
- command line. The ID of the image will be used with the <literallayout class="monospaced">nova boot</literallayout>command.</para>
- <para>One thing to note here, once you publish the tarball, it has to untar before
- you can launch an image from it. Using the 'nova list' command, and make sure the image
- has it's status as "ACTIVE".</para>
-
- <para><literallayout class="monospaced">nova image-list</literallayout></para>
-
- <para>Depending on the image that you're using, you need a public key to connect to it. Some
- images have built-in accounts already created. Images can be shared by many users, so it
- is dangerous to put passwords into the images. Nova therefore supports injecting ssh
- keys into instances before they are booted. This allows a user to login to the instances
- that he or she creates securely. Generally the first thing that a user does when using
- the system is create a keypair. </para>
- <para>Keypairs provide secure authentication to your instances. As part of the first boot of
- a virtual image, the private key of your keypair is added to root’s authorized_keys
- file. Nova generates a public and private key pair, and sends the private key to the
- user. The public key is stored so that it can be injected into instances. </para>
- <para>Keypairs are created through the api and you use them as a parameter when launching an
- instance. They can be created on the command line using the following command :
- <literallayout class="monospaced">nova keypair-add</literallayout>In order to list all the available options, you would run :<literallayout class="monospaced">nova help </literallayout>
- Example usage:</para>
-
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
-nova keypair-add test > test.pem
-chmod 600 test.pem
- </literallayout>
-
- <para>Now, you can run the instances:</para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">nova boot --image 1 --flavor 1 --key_name test my-first-server</literallayout>
- <para>Here's a description of the parameters used above:</para>
- <itemizedlist>
- <listitem>
- <para><emphasis role="bold">--flavor</emphasis> what type of image to create. You
- can get all the flavors you have by running
- <literallayout class="monospaced">nova flavor-list</literallayout></para>
- </listitem>
- <listitem>
- <para>
- <emphasis role="bold">-key_ name</emphasis> name of the key to inject in to the
- image at launch. </para>
- </listitem>
- </itemizedlist>
- <para> The instance will go from “BUILD” to “ACTIVE” in a short time, and you should
- be able to connect via SSH using the 'ubuntu' account, with the password 'ubuntu':
- (replace $ipaddress with the one you got from nova list): </para>
- <para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">ssh ubuntu@$ipaddress</literallayout></para>
- <para>The 'ubuntu' user is part of the sudoers group, so you can escalate to 'root'
- via the following command:</para>
- <para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
- sudo -i
- </literallayout>
- </para>
- </section>
+ <xi:include href="compute-starting-images.xml"/>
<section xml:id="deleting-instances">
<title>Deleting Instances</title>
View
4 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-install/ch_installcomputeimage.xml
@@ -12,8 +12,8 @@
<xi:include href="install-config-glance.xml" />
<!--<xi:include href="installing-additional-compute-nodes.xml" />-->
<xi:include href="compute-verifying-install.xml" />
- <xi:include href="nova-manage-initial-user-project.xml" />
- <xi:include href="enable-access-security-group.xml" />
+ <!--<xi:include href="nova-manage-initial-user-project.xml" />-->
+ <!--<xi:include href="enable-access-security-group.xml" />-->
<!--<xi:include href="compute-migrating-from-cactus-to-diablo.xml"/>-->
</chapter>
View
28 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-install/compute-packages-ubuntu-installation.xml
@@ -33,9 +33,8 @@
on eth0.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
- <para>192.168.11.0/24 as the fixed range for
- our guest VMs, connected to the host via
- br100.</para>
+ <para>192.168.100.0/24 as the fixed range for our
+ guest VMs, connected to the host via br100.</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>FlatDHCP with a single network
@@ -92,8 +91,9 @@ bridge_fd 0
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo apt-get install bridge-utils</literallayout>
<para>Ensure that you set up the bridge. </para>
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo brctl addbr br100</literallayout>
- <para>Lastly, restart networking to have these
- changes take effect.</para>
+ <para>Lastly, restart networking to have these changes take
+ effect. (This method is deprecated but "<code>restart
+ networking</code>" doesn't always work.)</para>
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo /etc/init.d/networking restart</literallayout></section>
<section xml:id="installing-the-cloud-controller">
<title>Installing the Cloud Controller</title>
@@ -126,8 +126,8 @@ bridge_fd 0
installed.</para>
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo apt-get install nova-volume nova-vncproxy nova-api nova-ajax-console-proxy nova-doc nova-scheduler
sudo apt-get install nova-network nova-compute</literallayout>
- <para>Install the supplemental tools such as euca2ools and unzip.</para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">sudo apt-get install euca2ools unzip</literallayout>
+ <para>Install the supplemental tool unzip.</para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">sudo apt-get install unzip</literallayout>
<para>Next set up the database, either MySQL or PostgreSQL,
with a database named "nova" and a user named "nova"
granting the "nova" user full access to the
@@ -149,8 +149,8 @@ sudo apt-get install nova-network nova-compute</literallayout>
since the file contains your MySQL server’s username and password. You also want to
ensure that the nova user belongs to the nova group.</para>
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo usermod -g nova nova
-chown -R root:nova /etc/nova
-chmod 640 /etc/nova/nova.conf</literallayout>
+sudo chown -R root:nova /etc/nova
+sudo chmod 640 /etc/nova/nova.conf</literallayout>
<para>The hypervisor is set either by editing
/etc/nova/nova.conf or referring to nova-compute.conf in
the nova.conf file. The hypervisor defaults to "kvm", but
@@ -196,18 +196,20 @@ chmod 640 /etc/nova/nova.conf</literallayout>
<para>Create the tables in your backend data store by running
the following command:</para>
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo nova-manage db sync</literallayout>
+ <para>If you see any response, you can look in
+ /var/log/nova/nova-manage.log to see the problem. No
+ response means the command completed correctly and your
+ nova database is now populated.</para>
<para>On both nodes, restart all services in total, just to cover the entire
spectrum: </para>
<para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
-sudo restart nova-api
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">sudo restart nova-api
sudo restart nova-compute
sudo restart nova-network
sudo restart nova-scheduler
sudo restart libvirt-bin
-sudo /etc/init.d/rabbitmq-server restart
- </literallayout>
+sudo /etc/init.d/rabbitmq-server restart </literallayout>
</para>
<para>All nova services are now installed. Next you
can install and configure the Image Service,
View
42 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-install/enable-access-security-group.xml
@@ -4,32 +4,34 @@
xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"
xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" version="5.0">
<title>Enabling Access to VMs on the Compute Node</title>
- <para>One of the most commonly missed configuration areas is not allowing the proper
- access to VMs. Use the ‘euca-authorize’ command to enable access. Below, you will
- find the commands to allow 'ping' and 'ssh' to your VMs : </para>
+ <para>One of the most commonly missed configuration areas is not
+ allowing the proper access to VMs. Use the nova client to
+ enable access. The commands below allow 'ping' and 'ssh' to
+ your VMs : </para>
<note>
- <para>
- These commands need to be run as root only if the credentials used to interact with nova-api have been put under /root/.bashrc.
- If the EC2 credentials have been put into another user's .bashrc file, then, it is necessary to run these commands as the user.
- </para>
+ <para> These commands need to be run as root only if the
+ credentials used to interact with nova-api have been put
+ under /root/.bashrc. If the EC2 credentials have been put
+ into another user's .bashrc file, then, it is necessary to
+ run these commands as the user. You can also add --username
+ as a parameter to the nova command when you want to run as a specific user. </para>
</note>
<literallayout class="monospaced">
nova  secgroup-add-rule default icmp - 1 -1 0.0.0.0/0
nova  secgroup-add-rule default tcp 22 22 0.0.0.0/0
</literallayout>
- <para>Another
- common issue is you cannot ping or SSH your instances after issuing the
- ‘euca-authorize’ commands. Something to look at is the amount of ‘dnsmasq’
- processes that are running. If you have a running instance, check to see that
- TWO "dnsmasq’" processes are running. If not, perform the following:
- </para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
-sudo killall dnsmasq
-sudo service nova-network restart
- </literallayout>
- <para>If you get the <literallayout class="monospaced">instance not found</literallayout> message
- while performing the restart, that means the service was not previously running. You
- simply need to start it instead of restarting it :
+ <para>Another common issue is you cannot ping or SSH your
+ instances after issuing these commands. Something to look at
+ is the amount of ‘dnsmasq’ processes that are running. If you
+ have a running instance, check to see that TWO "dnsmasq’"
+ processes are running. If not, perform the following: </para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">sudo killall dnsmasq
+sudo service nova-network restart</literallayout>
+ <para>If you get the
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">instance not found</literallayout>
+ message while performing the restart, that means the service
+ was not previously running. You simply need to start it
+ instead of restarting it:
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo service nova-network start</literallayout>
</para>
</section>
View
46 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-install/identity-install-keystone.xml
@@ -15,30 +15,44 @@
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo echo "deb http://ops.rcb.me/packages maverick diablo-final" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/rcb-sources.list</literallayout>
<para>Install the Identity service:</para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">apt-get install keystone</literallayout>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">sudo apt-get install keystone</literallayout>
- <para>After installing, you want to start the service, then delete
- the sqlite database it creates, then change the configuration
- to point to the mysql database. To start up the Identity
- Service (Keystone), enter the following:</para>
-
- <literallayout class="monospaced">cd ~/keystone/bin &amp;&amp; ./keystone </literallayout>
-
- <para>In return you should see something like this:</para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">Starting the Legacy Authentication component
- Service API listening on 0.0.0.0:5000
- Admin API listening on 0.0.0.0:5001</literallayout>
- <para>Delete the keystone.db file created in the /var/lib/keystone/ directory.</para>
+ <para>After installing, you need to delete the sqlite database it
+ creates, then change the configuration to point to the mysql
+ database. </para>
+ <para>Delete the keystone.db file created in the
+ /var/lib/keystone/
+ directory.<literallayout>sudo rm /var/lib/keystone/keystone.db</literallayout></para>
<para>Configure the production-ready backend data store. Install
mysql if it's not already available:</para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">apt-get install python-mysqldb</literallayout>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">sudo apt-get install python-mysqldb</literallayout>
<para>For MySQL, create a MySQL database named "keystone" and a
MySQL user named "keystone". Grant the "keystone" user full
access to the "keystone" MySQL database.</para>
+
+ <para>Start the mysql command line client by running:</para>
+ <para><literallayout class="monospaced">mysql -u root -p</literallayout></para>
+ <para>Enter the mysql root user's password when prompted.</para>
+ <para>To configure the MySQL database, create the glance database. </para>
+ <para><literallayout class="monospaced">mysql> CREATE DATABASE keystone;</literallayout></para>
+ <para>Create a MySQL user for the newly-created keystone database that
+ has full control of the database. </para>
+ <para><literallayout class="monospaced">mysql> GRANT ALL ON keystone.* TO 'keystone'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'yourpassword';</literallayout></para>
+ <para>Enter quit at the mysql> prompt to exit MySQL.</para>
+ <para><literallayout class="monospaced">mysql> quit</literallayout></para>
<para>Edit /etc/keystone/keystone.conf to include the
--sql_connection to use the backend data store you just
- created.</para>
-
+ created. Here is an example:</para>
+
+ <literallayout>[keystone.backends.sqlalchemy]
+# SQLAlchemy connection string for the reference implementation registry
+# server. Any valid SQLAlchemy connection string is fine.
+# See: http://bit.ly/ideIpI
+sql_connection = mysql://keystone:yourpassword@192.168.206.130/keystone
+backend_entities = ['UserRoleAssociation', 'Endpoints', 'Role', 'Tenant',
+ 'User', 'Credentials', 'EndpointTemplates', 'Token',
+ 'Service']</literallayout>
+ <para>Restart the keystone service.</para>
<para>Edit /etc/keystone/keystone.conf to use the IP address and
ports for your environment. Here is an example keystone.conf
to get you started.
View
10 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-install/install-config-glance.xml
@@ -32,8 +32,14 @@
<para><literallayout class="monospaced">mysql> quit</literallayout></para>
<para>Edit /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf to include the
sql_connection to use the backend data store you just created,
- such as
- mysql://glance:yourpassword@192.168.206.129/glance.</para>
+ such as mysql://glance:yourpassword@192.168.206.130/glance.
+ Here is the relevant section:</para>
+ <para>
+ <literallayout># SQLAlchemy connection string for the reference implementation
+# registry server. Any valid SQLAlchemy connection string is fine.
+# See: http://www.sqlalchemy.org/docs/05/reference/sqlalchemy/connections.html#sqlalchemy.create_engine
+sql_connection = mysql://glance:glancepwd@192.168.206.130/glance</literallayout>
+ </para>
<para>Create the tables in your backend data
store:</para>
<literallayout class="monospaced">sudo glance-manage db_sync</literallayout>
View
64 doc/src/docbkx/openstack-install/nova-manage-initial-user-project.xml
@@ -18,8 +18,7 @@ nova-manage network create &lt;network-label> --bridge=&lt;bridgename> &lt;IP-ra
</para>
<para>Here is an example of what this looks like with real values
entered and values returned: </para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
-$ sudo nova-manage user admin dub
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">$ sudo nova-manage user admin dub
export EC2_ACCESS_KEY=a42e03c9-656d-4c11-a660-80ed374a4cfb
export EC2_SECRET_KEY=a00a3a32-726a-4e1e-b0c8-24e7df55c959
@@ -43,24 +42,57 @@ $ sudo nova-manage network create novanet --bridge=br100 192.168.100.0/24 1 256
automatically for Flat Manager.</para>
<section xml:id="creating-certifications">
<title>Creating Credentials</title>
- <para>Generate the credentials as a zip file. These are the certs you will use to
- launch instances, bundle images, and all the other assorted API functions. </para>
+ <para>Generate the credentials as a zip file from the project
+ creation command. These are the certs you can use to
+ launch instances, bundle images, and all the other
+ assorted API functions when using "deprecated auth" with
+ the -use_deprecated_auth flag set to true (or just
+ present) in your nova.conf file. </para>
<para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
-mkdir –p /root/creds
-/usr/bin/python /usr/bin/nova-manage project zipfile $NOVA_PROJECT $NOVA_PROJECT_USER /root/creds/novacreds.zip
- </literallayout>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">mkdir –p ~/creds
+sudo nova-manage project zipfile $NOVA_PROJECT $NOVA_PROJECT_USER /username/creds/novacreds.zip </literallayout>
+ </para>
+ <para>Using the example project names above, you would use
+ this command:</para>
+ <para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">$ sudo nova-manage project zipfile dubproject dub ~/creds/novacreds.zip</literallayout>
</para>
<para>If you are using one of the Flat modes for networking, you may see a Warning
message "No vpn data for project &lt;project_name>" which you can safely
ignore.</para>
<para>Unzip them in your home directory, and add them to your environment. </para>
- <literallayout class="monospaced">
-unzip /root/creds/novacreds.zip -d /root/creds/
-cat /root/creds/novarc >> ~/.bashrc
-source ~/.bashrc
- </literallayout>
- <para>
- If you already have Nova credentials present in your environment, you can use a script included with Glance the Image Service, tools/nova_to_os_env.sh, to create Glance-style credentials. This script adds OS_AUTH credentials to the environment which are used by the Image Service to enable private images when the Identity Service is configured as the authentication system for Compute and the Image Service.</para>
- </section>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">unzip /home/username/creds/novacreds.zip -d /home/username/creds/
+cat /home/username/creds/novarc >> ~/.bashrc
+source ~/.bashrc </literallayout>
+ <para>Here is an example novarc file:</para>
+ <literallayout class="monospaced">NOVARC=$(readlink -f "${BASH_SOURCE:-${0}}" 2>/dev/null) ||
+NOVARC=$(python -c 'import os,sys; print os.path.abspath(os.path.realpath(sys.argv[1]))' "${BASH_SOURCE:-${0}}")
+NOVA_KEY_DIR=${NOVARC%/*}
+export EC2_ACCESS_KEY="f376bf76-d515-4cf9-8a41-201bbbafa0aa:dubproject"
+export EC2_SECRET_KEY="874f763d-cd07-4191-988a-be0ec5b86cf5"
+export EC2_URL="http://192.168.206.130:8773/services/Cloud"
+export S3_URL="http://192.168.206.130:3333"
+export EC2_USER_ID=42 # nova does not use user id, but bundling requires it
+export EC2_PRIVATE_KEY=${NOVA_KEY_DIR}/pk.pem
+export EC2_CERT=${NOVA_KEY_DIR}/cert.pem
+export NOVA_CERT=${NOVA_KEY_DIR}/cacert.pem
+export EUCALYPTUS_CERT=${NOVA_CERT} # euca-bundle-image seems to require this set
+alias ec2-bundle-image="ec2-bundle-image --cert ${EC2_CERT} --privatekey ${EC2_PRIVATE_KEY} --user 42 --ec2cert ${NOVA_CERT}"
+alias ec2-upload-bundle="ec2-upload-bundle -a ${EC2_ACCESS_KEY} -s ${EC2_SECRET_KEY} --url ${S3_URL} --ec2cert ${NOVA_CERT}"
+export NOVA_API_KEY="c376af76-d515-4cf9-8d41-201bbbafa0aa"
+export NOVA_USERNAME="dub"
+export NOVA_PROJECT_ID="dubproject"
+export NOVA_URL="http://192.168.206.130:8774/v1.1/"
+export NOVA_VERSION="1.1"</literallayout>
+ <para>If you already have Nova credentials present in your
+ environment, you can use a script included with the Image
+ Service Glance, tools/nova_to_os_env.sh, to create
+ Glance-style credentials. This script adds OS_AUTH
+ credentials to the environment which are used by the Image
+ Service to enable private images when the Identity Service
+ is configured as the authentication system for Compute and
+ the Image Service.</para>
+
</section>
+
+</section>

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