Very Simple Lisp Calculator to show of LLVM JIT
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llvm
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Compile.hs
Error.hs
Eval.hs
Main.hs
Parser.hs
README.md
Scheme.hs
Scope.hs
Value.hs

README.md

#Calc#

A simplified lisp-like calculator written in haskell to show how to use LLVM JIT compilation. It was written as a way to teach myself the workings of the llvm haskell bindings.

##Getting Started##

It should be noted before begingin that this program is not useful but is instead and example -- a toy. But toy is no fun unless you know how to use it.

###Installation##

You will need:

  • [The Glorious Glasgow Haskell Compilation System, version 7.0.4][1]. Version 7.0.3 may also work but the author has not tried it.
  • [LLVM Version 2.9][2]. Version 2.8 may work but the author has not tried it.
  • The Haskell llvm bindings. The easiest way to get these is to cabal install llvm. However, some recent version of the llvm bindings were not compatible with LLVM 2.9. In that case clone the [github repository][https://github.com/bos/llvm] and do a cabal install from within that directory

Once all the dependencies are installed, ghc -o calc Main.hs will compile the calc program.

###Runing calc###

The program uses the standard Lisp syntax for writing equations. So instead of 2 + 3 * 5 you would instead write (* (+ 2 3) 5). Equations written at the prompt will be evaluated by an interperter.

calc will compile functions written with the define syntax. Note: Only functions can be defined. Ex:

(define (foo x y) (+ (+ x x) (+ y y) 10)

This will define a function called foo which takes two arguments and calculates the value of the equation x+x + y+y + 10.

The prompt is readline enabled. You may leav the program by typing "exit" at the prompt.

###Limitations###

In order to keep this program as simpe as possible several limitations are imposed that are not present in a typical Lisp:

  • Only Integers are allowed
  • At this time only (+) is defined as an opperator
  • The check that the number of arguments matched the numner of parameters is elided.
  • The define is the only syntax defined and it only works in the form above.

The Dime Tour##

Main.hs

We begin with some imports and utility functions:

  • flushStr is cruft from a time before readline support
  • readPrompt takes a string -- the prompt line, get a line of input from the terminal, and returns that string.
  • until_ is the semi-infinate loop that runs the REPL

In Main, we begin by initializing the JIT enginge from LLVM.ExecutionEngine. Then we initialize the Read Eval Print Loop (repl) from Scheme.hs, and setup ReadLine support as found in System.Console.SimpleLineEditor.

We then repeatedly read a prompt and pass the resulting line to repl displaying the result of each evaluation.

The string "exit" break the loop in until and we clean up our terminal with SLE.restore before exiting.

Scheme.hs

This file take the various opperations like parsing, evaluation, and error handleing and glues them together.

The replLisp function is what makes this happen. It takes the current active scope and a string to process and returns the result in the IO monad. The Evaluator runs within an error transformer layered over the IO monad. This structure is defined throughout as IOThrowsError from Error.hs. The replLisp function therefore wraps is primary work in a call to runErrorT.

First it uses readLisp form the Parser to build an Abstract Syntax Tree (ast) of Values. It passes this ast to evalLast which actually runs each statement present in the ast but returns the result only of the last. See Eval.hs for an implimentation.

The result value is an Either in the standard configuration with errors as strings on the left or a succesful result value on the right. The final line merges these potential outcomes into a string for display.

The buildREPL funciton first creates a new topscope from Eval.hs then produces a function to use that scope with replLisp to run a Read Eval Print Loop.

The evalExpr function can be used from GHCi for running strings directly. It will create a fresh top binding each time it is called however so it is not very useful for testing define statements.

Parser.hs

The workings of a parsec parser are beyond the scope of this example. This File impliments a very simple parser which turn strings into Abstract Syntax Trees (asts). The Grammar builds from small to large as you read down the page with parseProgram being the complete parser.

readLisp arranges to take a String and adds the necessary extra functionality needed to run a parsec parser and format errors.

Scope.hs

The working of this file are also beyond the scope of this example. It is borrowed from a much more functionally complete Scheme interpreter. The simple version is that this is a hash between variable names as Strings and thier associated values. The Evaluator uses Scope values to store and retrieve variables.

Values.hs

This is the data structure for the Abstract Syntax Tree (ast). It is far simpler then a full Lisp tree. Only Integers may be past to compiled functions. The Interpreter also understands lists and functions. The syntax of the languages is built up in nested List structures as is common in Lisp.

Value is made an instance of Show.

Error.hs

Defines an error monad both by itself and layered on top of the IO monad and provides a function to raise the former to the latter.

Eval.hs

TODO

Compile.hs

TODO

##Licence##

Copyright (c) 2011 John Miller

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.