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# Redis configuration file example

# By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
# Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
daemonize no

# When run as a daemon, Redis write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by default.
# You can specify a custom pid file location here.
pidfile /var/run/redis.pid

# Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379
port 6379

# If you want you can bind a single interface, if the bind option is not
# specified all the interfaces will listen for connections.
#
# bind 127.0.0.1

# Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
timeout 300

# Set server verbosity to 'debug'
# it can be one of:
# debug (a lot of information, useful for development/testing)
# verbose (many rarely useful info, but not a mess like the debug level)
# notice (moderately verbose, what you want in production probably)
# warning (only very important / critical messages are logged)
loglevel verbose

# Specify the log file name. Also 'stdout' can be used to force
# the demon to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
# output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
logfile stdout

# Set the number of databases. The default database is DB 0, you can select
# a different one on a per-connection basis using SELECT <dbid> where
# dbid is a number between 0 and 'databases'-1
databases 16

################################ SNAPSHOTTING #################################
#
# Save the DB on disk:
#
# save <seconds> <changes>
#
# Will save the DB if both the given number of seconds and the given
# number of write operations against the DB occurred.
#
# In the example below the behaviour will be to save:
# after 900 sec (15 min) if at least 1 key changed
# after 300 sec (5 min) if at least 10 keys changed
# after 60 sec if at least 10000 keys changed
#
# Note: you can disable saving at all commenting all the "save" lines.

save 900 1
save 300 10
save 60 10000

# Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
# For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
# If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
# the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
rdbcompression yes

# The filename where to dump the DB
dbfilename dump.rdb

# For default save/load DB in/from the working directory
# Note that you must specify a directory not a file name.
dir ./

################################# REPLICATION #################################

# Master-Slave replication. Use slaveof to make a Redis instance a copy of
# another Redis server. Note that the configuration is local to the slave
# so for example it is possible to configure the slave to save the DB with a
# different interval, or to listen to another port, and so on.
#
# slaveof <masterip> <masterport>

# If the master is password protected (using the "requirepass" configuration
# directive below) it is possible to tell the slave to authenticate before
# starting the replication synchronization process, otherwise the master will
# refuse the slave request.
#
# masterauth <master-password>

################################## SECURITY ###################################

# Require clients to issue AUTH <PASSWORD> before processing any other
# commands. This might be useful in environments in which you do not trust
# others with access to the host running redis-server.
#
# This should stay commented out for backward compatibility and because most
# people do not need auth (e.g. they run their own servers).
#
# requirepass foobared

################################### LIMITS ####################################

# Set the max number of connected clients at the same time. By default there
# is no limit, and it's up to the number of file descriptors the Redis process
# is able to open. The special value '0' means no limits.
# Once the limit is reached Redis will close all the new connections sending
# an error 'max number of clients reached'.
#
# maxclients 128

# Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
# When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys with an
# EXPIRE set. It will try to start freeing keys that are going to expire
# in little time and preserve keys with a longer time to live.
# Redis will also try to remove objects from free lists if possible.
#
# If all this fails, Redis will start to reply with errors to commands
# that will use more memory, like SET, LPUSH, and so on, and will continue
# to reply to most read-only commands like GET.
#
# WARNING: maxmemory can be a good idea mainly if you want to use Redis as a
# 'state' server or cache, not as a real DB. When Redis is used as a real
# database the memory usage will grow over the weeks, it will be obvious if
# it is going to use too much memory in the long run, and you'll have the time
# to upgrade. With maxmemory after the limit is reached you'll start to get
# errors for write operations, and this may even lead to DB inconsistency.
#
# maxmemory <bytes>

############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################

# By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. If you can live
# with the idea that the latest records will be lost if something like a crash
# happens this is the preferred way to run Redis. If instead you care a lot
# about your data and don't want to that a single record can get lost you should
# enable the append only mode: when this mode is enabled Redis will append
# every write operation received in the file appendonly.log. This file will
# be read on startup in order to rebuild the full dataset in memory.
#
# Note that you can have both the async dumps and the append only file if you
# like (you have to comment the "save" statements above to disable the dumps).
# Still if append only mode is enabled Redis will load the data from the
# log file at startup ignoring the dump.rdb file.
#
# The name of the append only file is "appendonly.log"
#
# IMPORTANT: Check the BGREWRITEAOF to check how to rewrite the append
# log file in background when it gets too big.

appendonly no

# The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
# instead to wait for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush
# data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
#
# Redis supports three different modes:
#
# no: don't fsync, just let the OS flush the data when it wants. Faster.
# always: fsync after every write to the append only log . Slow, Safest.
# everysec: fsync only if one second passed since the last fsync. Compromise.
#
# The default is "always" that's the safer of the options. It's up to you to
# understand if you can relax this to "everysec" that will fsync every second
# or to "no" that will let the operating system flush the output buffer when
# it want, for better performances (but if you can live with the idea of
# some data loss consider the default persistence mode that's snapshotting).

appendfsync always
# appendfsync everysec
# appendfsync no

################################ VIRTUAL MEMORY ###############################

# Virtual Memory allows Redis to work with datasets bigger than the actual
# amount of RAM needed to hold the whole dataset in memory.
# In order to do so very used keys are taken in memory while the other keys
# are swapped into a swap file, similarly to what operating systems do
# with memory pages.
#
# To enable VM just set 'vm-enabled' to yes, and set the following three
# VM parameters accordingly to your needs.

vm-enabled no
# vm-enabled yes

# This is the path of the Redis swap file. As you can guess, swap files
# can't be shared by different Redis instances, so make sure to use a swap
# file for every redis process you are running.
#
# The swap file name may contain "%p" that is substituted with the PID of
# the Redis process, so the default name /tmp/redis-%p.vm will work even
# with multiple instances as Redis will use, for example, redis-811.vm
# for one instance and redis-593.vm for another one.
#
# Useless to say, the best kind of disk for a Redis swap file (that's accessed
# at random) is a Solid State Disk (SSD).
vm-swap-file /tmp/redis-%p.vm

# vm-max-memory configures the VM to use at max the specified amount of
# RAM. Everything that deos not fit will be swapped on disk *if* possible, that
# is, if there is still enough contiguous space in the swap file.
#
# With vm-max-memory 10000000 the system will swap almost everything it
# can. Not a good default, just specify the max amount of RAM you can
# in bytes, but it's better to leave some margin. For instance specify
# an amount of RAM that's more or less 80% of your free RAM.
vm-max-memory 10000000

# Redis swap files is split into pages. An object can be saved using multiple
# contiguous pages, but pages can't be shared between different objects.
# So if your page is too big, small objects swapped out on disk will waste
# a lot of space. If you page is too small, there is less space in the swap
# file (assuming you configured the same number of total swap file pages).
#
# If you use a lot of small objects, use a page size of 64 or 32 bytes.
# If you use a lot of big objects, use a bigger page size.
# If unsure, use the default :)
vm-page-size 256

# Number of total memory pages in the swap file.
# Given that the page table (a bitmap of free/used pages) is taken in memory,
# every 8 pages on disk will consume 1 byte of RAM.
#
# The total swap size is vm-page-size * vm-pages
#
# With the default of 256-bytes memory pages and 104857600 pages Redis will
# use a 25 GB swap file, that will use roughly 13 MB of RAM for the page table.
#
# It's better to use the smallest acceptable value for your application,
# but the default is large in order to work in most conditions.
vm-pages 104857600

# Max number of VM I/O threads running at the same time.
# This threads are used to read/write data from/to swap file, since they
# also encode and decode objects from disk to memory or the reverse, a bigger
# number of threads can help with big objects even if they can't help with
# I/O itself as the physical device may not be able to couple with many
# reads/writes operations at the same time.
#
# The special value of 0 turn off threaded I/O and enables the blocking
# Virtual Memory implementation.
vm-max-threads 4

############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################

# Glue small output buffers together in order to send small replies in a
# single TCP packet. Uses a bit more CPU but most of the times it is a win
# in terms of number of queries per second. Use 'yes' if unsure.
glueoutputbuf yes

# Use object sharing. Can save a lot of memory if you have many common
# string in your dataset, but performs lookups against the shared objects
# pool so it uses more CPU and can be a bit slower. Usually it's a good
# idea.
#
# When object sharing is enabled (shareobjects yes) you can use
# shareobjectspoolsize to control the size of the pool used in order to try
# object sharing. A bigger pool size will lead to better sharing capabilities.
# In general you want this value to be at least the double of the number of
# very common strings you have in your dataset.
#
# WARNING: object sharing is experimental, don't enable this feature
# in production before of Redis 1.0-stable. Still please try this feature in
# your development environment so that we can test it better.
shareobjects no
shareobjectspoolsize 1024
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