FastAttributes adds attributes with their types to the class
Ruby
Latest commit 93699fc Sep 16, 2016 @kostyantyn kostyantyn Release 0.9.0

README.md

FastAttributes

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Motivation

There are already a lot of good and flexible gems which solve a similar problem, allowing attributes to be defined with their types, for example: virtus or attrio. However, the disadvantage of these gems is performance. So, the goal of fast_attributes is to provide a simple solution which is fast, understandable and extendable.

This is the performance benchmark of fast_attributes compared to other popular gems.

Comparison:
FastAttributes: without values                       :  1528209.4 i/s
FastAttributes: integer values for integer attributes:    88794.2 i/s - 17.21x slower
FastAttributes: string values for integer attributes :    77673.3 i/s - 19.67x slower
Virtus: integer values for integer attributes        :    21104.7 i/s - 72.41x slower
Attrio: integer values for integer attributes        :    11932.2 i/s - 128.07x slower
Attrio: string values for integer attributes         :    11007.2 i/s - 138.84x slower
Virtus: without values                               :    10151.0 i/s - 150.55x slower
Attrio: without values                               :     7164.3 i/s - 213.31x slower
Virtus: string values for integer attributes         :     3195.6 i/s - 478.22x slower

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'fast_attributes'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install fast_attributes

Usage

Define getter/setter methods:

class Book
  extend FastAttributes

  attribute :title, :name, String
  attribute :pages,        Integer
  attribute :authors,      Array
  attribute :published,    Date
  attribute :sold,         Time
  attribute :finished,     DateTime
end

book = Book.new
book.title     = 'There and Back Again'
book.name      = 'The Hobbit'
book.pages     = '200'
book.authors   = 'Tolkien'
book.published = '1937-09-21'
book.sold      = '2014-06-25 13:45'
book.finished  = '1937-08-20 12:35'

#<Book:0x007f9a0110be20
 @authors=["Tolkien"],
 @finished=
  #<DateTime: 1937-08-20T12:35:00+00:00 ((2428766j,45300s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>,
 @name="The Hobbit",
 @pages=200,
 @published=#<Date: 1937-09-21 ((2428798j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>,
 @sold=2014-06-25 13:45:00 +0200,
 @title="There and Back Again">

To generate initialize and attributes methods, attribute definition should be wrapped with define_attributes:

class Book
  extend FastAttributes

  define_attributes initialize: true, attributes: true do
    attribute :title, :name, String
    attribute :pages,        Integer
    attribute :authors,      Array
    attribute :published,    Date
    attribute :sold,         Time
    attribute :finished,     DateTime
  end
end

book = Book.new(
  title:     'There and Back Again',
  name:      'The Hobbit',
  pages:     '200',
  authors:   'Tolkien',
  published: '1937-09-21',
  sold:      '2014-06-25 13:45',
  finished:  '1937-08-20 12:35'
)

book.attributes
{"title"=>"There and Back Again",
 "name"=>"The Hobbit",
 "pages"=>200,
 "authors"=>["Tolkien"],
 "published"=>#<Date: 1937-09-21 ((2428798j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>,
 "sold"=>2014-06-25 13:45:00 +0200,
 "finished"=>
  #<DateTime: 1937-08-20T12:35:00+00:00 ((2428766j,45300s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>}

Default values

Requires define_attributes to be used with initialize: true (this is where the default values are set):

class Book
  extend FastAttributes

  define_attributes initialize: true do
    attribute :author, String, default: "Some String"
  end
end

book = Book.new
book.attributes
{"author" => "Some String"}

Attributes via accessors

Sometimes you want attributes to return the value of your accessors, rather than the instance variables. This is slower than using ivars directly, so use attributes: :accessors:

class Book
  extend FastAttributes

  define_attributes attributes: :accessors do
    attribute :author, String
  end

  def author
    @author || "No author set"
  end
end

book = Book.new
book.attributes
{"author" => "No author set"}

Custom Type

It's easy to add a custom attribute type.

FastAttributes.set_type_casting(OpenStruct, 'OpenStruct.new(name: %s)')

class Book
  extend FastAttributes
  attribute :author, OpenStruct
end

book = Book.new
book.author = 'Rowling'
book.author
# => #<OpenStruct name="Rowling">

Notice, that second parameter is a string. It's necessary because this code is compiled into a ruby method in runtime. The placeholder %s represents a value which this method accepts.

It's possible to refer to a placeholder several times.

Size = Class.new(Array)
FastAttributes.set_type_casting Size, <<-EOS
  Size[%s, %s]
EOS

class Square
  extend FastAttributes
  attribute :size, Size
end

square = Square.new
square.size = 5
square.size
# => [5, 5]

Method FastAttributes.set_type_casting generates the following template:

FastAttributes.set_type_casting String, 'String(%s)'
# begin
#   case %s
#   when nil    then nil
#   when String then %s
#   else String(%s)
#   end
# rescue => e
#   raise FastAttributes::TypeCast::InvalidValueError, %(Invalid value "\#{%s}" for attribute "%a" of type "String")
# end

and when the attribute is defined, fast_attributes generates the following setter method:

class A
  extend FastAttributes
  attribute :name, String
end

# def name=(value)
#   @name = begin
#     case value
#     when nil    then nil
#     when String then value
#     else String(value)
#     end
#   rescue => e
#     raise FastAttributes::TypeCast::InvalidValueError, %(Invalid value "#{value}" for attribute "name" of type "String")
#   end
# end

Notice, placeholder %a represents method name. Also, set_type_casting method generates lenient date type. See Lenient Data Types section.

If you need to conrol the whole type casting process, you can use the following DSL:

FastAttributes.type_cast String do     # begin
                                       #   case String
  from 'nil',    to: 'nil'             #   when nil    then nil
  from 'String', to: '%s'              #   when String then %s
  otherwise 'String(%s)'               #   else String(%s)
                                       #   end
  on_error 'TypeError', act: 'nil'     # rescue TypeError => e
                                       #   nil
  on_error 'StandardError', act: '""'  # rescue StandardError => e
                                       #   ""
end                                    # end

Lenient Data Types

It's also possible to define a lenient data type which doesn't correspond to any of ruby classes:

FastAttributes.type_cast :yes_no do
  from '"yes"', to: 'true'
  from '"no"',  to: 'false'
  otherwise 'nil'
end

class Order
  extend FastAttributes

  attribute :terms_of_service, :yes_no
end

order = Order.new
order.terms_of_service = 'yes'
order.terms_of_service
# => true
order.terms_of_service = 'no'
order.terms_of_service
# => false
order.terms_of_service = 42
order.terms_of_service
# => nil

All default data types have lenient notation:

class Book
  extend FastAttributes

  attribute :title,     :string
  attribute :pages,     :integer
  attribute :price,     :big_decimal
  attribute :authors,   :array
  attribute :published, :date
  attribute :sold,      :time
  attribute :finished,  :date_time
  attribute :rate,      :float
  attribute :active,    :boolean
end

Notice, Boolean attribute can be defined only via symbol, fast_attribute doesn't create Boolean class.

Extensions

Contributing

  1. Fork it ( http://github.com/applift/fast_attributes/fork )
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request