Cannot Exclude Item from ASP.NET5 Project #142

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Mike-EEE opened this Issue Aug 10, 2015 · 8 comments

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Mike-EEE commented Aug 10, 2015

Apologies if this is a known issue. I did search for it but wasn't able to find anything obvious. When I right-click a code file in an ASP.NET5 project, "Exclude from Project" does not appear as an option:

Perhaps this is a feature slated for an upcoming release?

@Mike-EEE Mike-EEE changed the title from Cannot Exclude Item from ASP.NET vNext Project to Cannot Exclude Item from ASP.NET5 Project Aug 10, 2015

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Eilon Aug 10, 2015

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Out of curiosity, what purpose do you have for excluding it? Do you want to exclude from compilation? From publishing? For other purposes? I ask because project.json has various exclusions, but different ones for different things.

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Eilon commented Aug 10, 2015

Out of curiosity, what purpose do you have for excluding it? Do you want to exclude from compilation? From publishing? For other purposes? I ask because project.json has various exclusions, but different ones for different things.

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Mike-EEE Aug 10, 2015

The same purpose of excluding my files in other projects, where it works as expected and is consistent with other projects within my solution. I do not have to worry about compilation and/or publishing with those projects. I just exclude it and I am a happy developer who can move on to other tasks. :)

I am not sure if you are aware of this, but there used to be a project type called "Website Project" that was offered by the ASP.NET group and was very different from other project types in Visual Studio. It was indeed different from other project types and people hated it. It eventually went away and "Web Application" projects were provided as the "official" way of creating web projects (and as you may or may not know, became the precursor to MVC). When I see this sort of functionality/mindset occur, I fear that the same thing might be happening here and the past is unfortunately repeating itself. Again I might be missing something here so please feel free to correct me.

Additionally, I brought this up in another issue, but we have been told that the tooling in VS would be a "lit up" experience, which to me sounds like an experience where I would not have to dig through a file to turn on and off basic functionality for a file in my project. All of this "just worked" in the .*proj system so hopefully you can understand the (impending, if not already anticipated and arrived) frustration here of having basic functionality moved into other places of a project now where we now have to look and manage in an old skool "hey, just edit a text file, no big deal!" manner.

Don't get me wrong. I appreciate different approaches (I am a huge fan of the ASP.NET rewrite, and think you have done a great job thus far) and this approach might be fine if ASP.NET lived in its own silo. However, (and unfortunately) a solution can have many projects and we now have fundamental differences in how projects are defined and managed within a Visual Studio solution. I am very surprised that 1) this was allowed in the first place by the Visual Studio team and 2) developers are not raising a bigger raging fit about it more. 😛

The same purpose of excluding my files in other projects, where it works as expected and is consistent with other projects within my solution. I do not have to worry about compilation and/or publishing with those projects. I just exclude it and I am a happy developer who can move on to other tasks. :)

I am not sure if you are aware of this, but there used to be a project type called "Website Project" that was offered by the ASP.NET group and was very different from other project types in Visual Studio. It was indeed different from other project types and people hated it. It eventually went away and "Web Application" projects were provided as the "official" way of creating web projects (and as you may or may not know, became the precursor to MVC). When I see this sort of functionality/mindset occur, I fear that the same thing might be happening here and the past is unfortunately repeating itself. Again I might be missing something here so please feel free to correct me.

Additionally, I brought this up in another issue, but we have been told that the tooling in VS would be a "lit up" experience, which to me sounds like an experience where I would not have to dig through a file to turn on and off basic functionality for a file in my project. All of this "just worked" in the .*proj system so hopefully you can understand the (impending, if not already anticipated and arrived) frustration here of having basic functionality moved into other places of a project now where we now have to look and manage in an old skool "hey, just edit a text file, no big deal!" manner.

Don't get me wrong. I appreciate different approaches (I am a huge fan of the ASP.NET rewrite, and think you have done a great job thus far) and this approach might be fine if ASP.NET lived in its own silo. However, (and unfortunately) a solution can have many projects and we now have fundamental differences in how projects are defined and managed within a Visual Studio solution. I am very surprised that 1) this was allowed in the first place by the Visual Studio team and 2) developers are not raising a bigger raging fit about it more. 😛

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davidfowl Aug 10, 2015

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It's counter productive to bring up the same thing in multiple issues. The exclude feature will come back and it will exclude everything using the underlying project.json as the machinery. If a user wants to get more advanced, they can edit the file themselves (or if they prefer editing files)

FWIW we are absolutely aware of website projects (some people were on that very team) and we are very much in the same boat with respect to feature gaps at the moment. As we get closer to rtm hopefully most of them will be closed so the traditional VS developer doesn't feel completely out of place.

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davidfowl commented Aug 10, 2015

It's counter productive to bring up the same thing in multiple issues. The exclude feature will come back and it will exclude everything using the underlying project.json as the machinery. If a user wants to get more advanced, they can edit the file themselves (or if they prefer editing files)

FWIW we are absolutely aware of website projects (some people were on that very team) and we are very much in the same boat with respect to feature gaps at the moment. As we get closer to rtm hopefully most of them will be closed so the traditional VS developer doesn't feel completely out of place.

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Mike-EEE Aug 11, 2015

It's counter productive to bring up the same thing in multiple issues.

Fair enough. I guess my concern here is that this does play in what has been told was going to be a "lit up" experience for VS users, and this issue is relevant to that, as now it seems like from reading your explanation that "hopefully" all of the functionality (that feels like it should already be in there) will somehow make it in before RTM. Rushed in, even, as a second thought.

It's counter productive to bring up the same thing in multiple issues.

Fair enough. I guess my concern here is that this does play in what has been told was going to be a "lit up" experience for VS users, and this issue is relevant to that, as now it seems like from reading your explanation that "hopefully" all of the functionality (that feels like it should already be in there) will somehow make it in before RTM. Rushed in, even, as a second thought.

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@Michael-DST We'll be publishing a tooling roadmap soon enough so you won't have to complain about the same features on each new bug 😄

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davidfowl commented Aug 11, 2015

@Michael-DST We'll be publishing a tooling roadmap soon enough so you won't have to complain about the same features on each new bug 😄

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Mike-EEE Aug 11, 2015

LOL awww... but then how I will I be useful???

LOL awww... but then how I will I be useful???

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webtools-bot Mar 28, 2017

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The GitHub Issue Tracker for the aspnet/Tooling repo is being deprecated in favor of Visual Studio's Report a Problem tool.

If this issue is still a problem with the RTW release of Visual Studio 2017, please report a new issue using the Report a Problem tool. While you can still use .NET Core and ASP.NET Preview tools with Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio 2017 is now the officially supported tool for developing .NET Core and ASP.NET Core projects.

By using the Report a Problem tool (available in both VS 2017 and VS 2015), you can collect detailed information about the problem, and send it to Microsoft with just a few button clicks. See Visual Studio's Talk to Us page for more details.

Please use the discussion topic here for feedback and questions on the deprecation of this issue tracker. Thanks!

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webtools-bot commented Mar 28, 2017

The GitHub Issue Tracker for the aspnet/Tooling repo is being deprecated in favor of Visual Studio's Report a Problem tool.

If this issue is still a problem with the RTW release of Visual Studio 2017, please report a new issue using the Report a Problem tool. While you can still use .NET Core and ASP.NET Preview tools with Visual Studio 2015, Visual Studio 2017 is now the officially supported tool for developing .NET Core and ASP.NET Core projects.

By using the Report a Problem tool (available in both VS 2017 and VS 2015), you can collect detailed information about the problem, and send it to Microsoft with just a few button clicks. See Visual Studio's Talk to Us page for more details.

Please use the discussion topic here for feedback and questions on the deprecation of this issue tracker. Thanks!

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mlorbetske Jul 19, 2017

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Sorry for the long delay here. It seems that what you're looking for are the DnxInvisible elements for the xproj file (there's a good overview of them in this Stack Overflow answer). Closing this for now (as I'm pretty sure this is the part you were looking for and it's been a very long time since there was an update here) - feel free to re-open if needed.

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mlorbetske commented Jul 19, 2017

Sorry for the long delay here. It seems that what you're looking for are the DnxInvisible elements for the xproj file (there's a good overview of them in this Stack Overflow answer). Closing this for now (as I'm pretty sure this is the part you were looking for and it's been a very long time since there was an update here) - feel free to re-open if needed.

@mlorbetske mlorbetske closed this Jul 19, 2017

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