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<html>
<head>
<title>The HTML5 test - How well does your browser support HTML5?</title>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
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<body>
<div class='header'>
<h1>The HTML5 test <em>&ndash; how well does your browser support HTML5?</em></h1>
<ul>
<li><a href='/index.html'>Your browser</a></li>
<li><a href='/results/desktop.html'>Other<span> browser</span>s</a></li>
<li><a href='/compare/browser/index.html'>Compare</a></li>
<li class='right selected'><a href='/about.html'>About<span> the test</span></a></li>
</ul>
</div>
<div class='page'>
<div class='paper'>
<ul>
<li class='selected'><a href='about.html'>Frequently asked questions</a></li>
<li><a href='donate.html'>Donate</a></li>
</ul>
<div>
<h2>Specifications</h2>
<h3>The HTML5 specification isn't finished yet!</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
True. Whenever the specification is updated, we also make sure the test is updated. If features are removed
from the specification we remove them from our tests and new tests are created for additions to the specification.
</div>
<h3>Why do you include specifications that are not part of HTML5?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
<p>
HTML5 means different things to different people. You could argue that HTML5 only includes features that are
defined in the W3C HTML5 specification. Or you could argue that it includes every specification, draft or
experimental feature that is added to browsers in the last couple of years. We decided to take the middle
ground and split the test into three parts: the official HTML5 specification, specifications that are related
to HTML5 and some experimental new features that are extensions of HTML5.
</p>
<p>
Many of the related specifications were at one time part of HTML5. During the development of the specification
they were moved to separate specifications.
</p>
</div>
<h3>But WebGL isn't even a W3C specification!</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
The W3C isn't the only organization that creates open specifications for the web. The WebGL specification is
published by Kronos, the same group that is also responsible for OpenGL. WebGL is related to HTML5 though and
listed as one of the HTML5 technologies on the W3C HTML5 logo page. The W3C HTML5 specification allows the
canvas element to be extended by new drawing methods and WebGL is one of them.
</div>
<h3>Why do you test for Chrome's Web Audio API, but not Mozilla's Audio Data API?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
The Web Audio API is an official proposal submitted to the W3C Audio Working Group and may end up being an official audio
specification. The Audio Data API has been deprecated by Mozilla and may not be supported in future releases.
</div>
<h3>Why do you test for Web SQL?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
The Web SQL specification has been deprecated and replaced by the IndexedDB specification. It is however
still commonly used on mobile phones and at least three vendors have shipped desktop browsers supporting Web SQL. We've decided to include
this specification, but make it a special case. Web SQL is worth 5 points, but only if IndexedDB is not supported.
IndexedDB is worth 10 points. If a browser supports both, only 10 points are awarded. This way browsers
that only included IndexedDB are not penalized, but browsers that only support Web SQL do get some points.
</div>
<hr>
<h2>Scoring</h2>
<h3>What is the maximum number of points you can score?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
If a browser passes all tests it would receive the maximum score of 500 points and 15 bonus points. Previous
versions of the HTML5test had less tests and therefore also a lower maximum score, such as 160, 300, 450 and 475 points.
In the future we will probably add even more tests which would also mean we will raise the maximum number of
points.
</div>
<h3>What are bonus points?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
HTML5 defines an <code>audio</code> and <code>video</code> element, which allows the browser to play media files. The HTML5 specification
does not define a required codec though. So for each common codec that is supported we award bonus points. Similarly
we give bonus points for SVG and MathML support. Bonus points are counted separately and do not count towards
the maximum of 500 points.
</div>
<h3>The scoring seems arbitrary, who decides how many points are awarded?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
We decided to award points for each feature depending on how important that feature is for web developers
and how difficult it is to implement that feature. A small and simple feature would be worth less points than a
large and complicated feature. We think this is the most honest way to grade browsers, because otherwise a browser
that only supports the small and simple features would score as high or higher than a browser that went the
extra mile and decided to tackle the big features. But in the end it is based on personal preference,
but I doubt there is a truly objective alternative.
</div>
<hr>
<h2>Methods</h2>
<h3>Why are you using browser sniffing?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
<p>
Unfortunately, in two very specific cases we are forced to use browser sniffing. The first case is <code>contentEditable</code>
which was not supported on many older mobile devices. Yet almost all mobile browsers claim to support <code>contentEditable</code>.
Fortunately modern mobile devices are starting to support <code>contentEditable</code>, but this left us with a problem. We
cannot reliably detect if a browser has proper support. The only way around this is to use a whitelist of
mobile browsers that do support this feature, otherwise you risk awarding points to mobile browsers that they
do not deserve. The second case is drag and drop, which is also not supported on mobile phones and tablets. </p>
<p>
Please open a new issue on <a href='https://github.com/NielsLeenheer/html5test'>Github</a> when you believe a
browser should be included on the whitelist.
</p>
</div>
<h3>How are you detecting when a field is using a custom user interface</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
The HTML5 specification introduces a number of new field types. Instead of just a plain input field there are now
color pickers, date pickers, number fields and sliders. The specification doesn't define what the user interface of these
new fields are supposed to look like. Rightly so, because the user interface might depend on the device that is
used. It does make detecting a bit problematic. What we do is look at the field itself and how the field affects
its surroundings. We start by creating a plain text field and wrap it with a block. We measure the rendered style of
the wrapper and the field itself. We then create a field of a specific type and measure the wrapper and the field again.
If the rendered style of the wrapper has changed, this should mean the field itself is rendered in such a way that
it affects its surroundings in a certain way. That does not mean it has a fully functioning custom user interface, but
this is the best we can do. Similarly we compare the rendered style of the field itself. If either one of these
is different from the plain text field, we assume the field has a custom user interface.
</div>
<hr>
<h2>Privacy</h2>
<h3>What kind of data is collected from visitors?</h3>
<div class='explaination'>
Each time you visit this website your score and test results are logged on our servers.
We also store the user agent of your browser which contains information about the browser,
operating system and device you are using. The collected information is solely used to
generated anonymized reports about HTML5 support in browsers and improve the quality of
our software.
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div class='footer'>
<div>
<div class='hosting'>
<a href='http://sights.nl/en/'><img src='/images/sights.png' width=55 alt='Sights'></a>
</div>
<div class='copyright'>
<p>
Copyright 2010-2012 by Sights
</p>
<p>
April, 2012 - version 3.0
</p>
<p>
The HTML5 test is being developed at <a href='http://github.com/NielsLeenheer/html5test'>Github</a>. Please file an issue there if you find any bugs or think of any improvements to this test.
Please note that the HTML5 test is not affiliated with the W3C or the HTML5 working group.
</p>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
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