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README.md

The Zenipex Library (zenilib) 0.5.3.0

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. License
  3. Supported Platforms
  4. Documentation

1. Introduction

The Zenipex Library (zenilib) is a game development framework, created with the goal of allowing someone with some knowledge of C++ to create 3D games for both Windows and Linux platforms (and hopefully others) quickly.

The original focuses of the project were to abstract away some basic differences between OpenGL and Direct3D 9 and to create an object-oriented framework for game development. It was never the goal to abstract away all differences between OpenGL and Direct3D or to create a fully optimized game development library with every feature you could possibly want.

Truly it started as an exercise in learning both OpenGL and Direct3D, with the hope that it would become something useful to me if to nobody else. Hopefully someone else in Wolverine Soft will use the thing too ;)

Since its initial release, ease of use has been a continual focus. Features have been added, and performance has been generally improved as well.

~bazald

2. License/Authors

The Zenipex Library is an open source project. For details please refer to the first comment in any given file and refer to the included copies of the GPL and LGPL.

Keep in mind that to fully comply with the GPL, you must include a copy of the GPL with your your releases using zenilib. Additionally, you should state what parts of your release are bound by the GPL. Finally, you must meet one of the following conditions:

  1. A copy of the GPL'd source code is included.
  2. A written offer to provide the GPL'd source code is included, and you keep an archive of all GPL'd source code ready at all times.

In my opinion, the first option is easier, as it requires no effort post-release. Additionally, in the second case, you must be willing to provide the source to anyone who asks not just the people who download your library.

If you have any questions about the GPL, feel free to shoot me an e-mail.

3. Supported Platforms

This software is known to compile and run on:

Windows: XP, Vista, 7 (using Visual Studio 2010 and 2012) MacOS X: 10.6 and up (using Xcode / clang) Linux: Debian (and derivatives), Red Hat Enterprise Linux (using GCC)

It should be possible to build it on any platform supported by:

Library Version License
ANGLE f3fc6571dca9832876e09c63b0958d413737757b BSD License
DirectX 9.0c Proprietary
OpenAL 1.1 Proprietary
OpenGL 1.1-1.4, 3.2-4.4 Proprietary
FreeType2 2.4.6 BSD License
GLEW 1.10.0 BSD License
lib3ds 2.0 RC 1 GNU LGPL
libogg 1.2.2 Xiph BSD-like License
libpng 1.2.46 zlib/libpng License
libvorbis 1.3.2 Xiph BSD-like License
SDL 2.0.0+ (Modified r7781) zlib License
SDL_net 2.0.0 zlib License
TinyXML 2.6.2 zlib/libpng License
zlib 1.2.5 zlib/libpng License

4. Documentation

Documentation is available in any format supported by Doxygen. You can build any format by modifying the ./Doxyfile file to access the correct directories on your system.