Runs command line programs or sends commands timed to music (or anything really!). Interfaces nicely with Audacity. Good for calling cues to music in live performance.
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samples
LICENSE
README
TODO
cuecaller.py
test

README

cuecaller.py
Copyright 2011 Berkeley Churchill
Distributed under GNU GPL v3



########## INSTALLING ###########

Dependencies: formally the only dependency is python.  However, by default ./cuecaller makes use of mplayer to play sound files.  I highly recommend you have it installed, or that you change the default player (step 2 below)

Step 1:  Copy the script into the directory of your choice.
Step 2:  (optional) If you want to change the default music player from mplayer, edit line 85 of ./cuecaller.py to suite your needs.
Step 3:  There is no step 3.  You're done.

########## TESTING ###########

STEP 1:  Run ./test
STEP 2:  You should hear the music from the intro to Phantom of the Opera playing and see "cues" being echoed to the command line corresponding to events in the music.

########## USING ###########

Step 1:  Write a configuration file.
    i) See samples/phantom.conf
    ii) Parameters you can set are:
        (a) INTERPRETER.  This runs the commands of your choice.  By default it's /bin/bash.  You can do very interesting things by using nc (netcat), custom lighting software, programing language interpreters, or other pieces of software.
        (b) LABELFILE.  This designates the file with the timing information.
        (c) SOUNDFILE.  The music that plays when the program starts.
        (d) SOUNDPLAYER.  The music player that's used.  (defaults to mplayer)
        (e) DEFAULTCOMMAND.  The command that's run for each cue.  It supports the following escape sequences:
            I.   %l, the label
            II.  %s, the start time in seconds
            III. %S, the start time in milliseconds
            IV.  %e, the end time in seconds
            V.   %E, the end time in milliseconds
            VI.  %t, the fade time (%e-%s)
            VII. %T, the fade time in milliseconds (%E-%S)
            IX.  %n, the cue number (automatically counted from 1)
            X.   %%, the percent symbol
        (f) STARTUPCOMMAND.  A command sent to the interpreter on startup.

Step 2:  Write the timing ("label") file.
    i) The easy way is to use Audacity.  Create a "label" everywhere you want a cue.  Then in the file menu, pick "Export Labels".  This is your label file.
    ii) You can also do this completely manually.  Create two columns separated by whitespace.  The first column is the "start time" for each cue and the second is the "end time".  

Step 3:  In your favorite terminal emulator, run "./cuecaller config_file_name".

Step 4:  Pat yourself on the back and relax.