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beginning of introduction gh-2

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# Introduction
In the past decade, as part of a broader reassessment of the relevance
-of academic geography, many have called for a renewed commitment to
-public geography. This commitment ranges from a focus on research
-projects will clear popular or general relevance, to
+of academic geography, many geographers have called for a renewed
+commitment to _public geography_. This commitment ranges from a focus
+on research projects with clear popular or general relevance, to
+communicating the results of one's research in more accessible
+language and to broader audiences, to **.
+
+Questions about the relevance of academic geography are nothing new,
+however. The 1960s and 1970s were another period that centered on
+these issues.
+
+Little noticed in the literature, though, has been the voice of
+academic geography in conservative public discourse. This paper aims
+to remedy that in a small way by examining the import and
+transformation of academic geographic ideas in the public discourse of
+the John Birch Society; a conservative political organization forged
+in the context of the Cold War, with echoes in the Tea Party movement
+of post-2008.
+
+This paper analyzes one such example of Susan Huck, who earned a PhD
+in geography in 19**, taught for a short time in American
+universities, and then went on to become a core public intellectual
+voice for the John Birch Society. My analysis places her inventions in
+context, working in two directions: 1) how Huck's discourse was shaped
+by larger geopolitical context, and 2) how she, and her geographic
+training, seems to have shaped larger conservative geopolitical
+discourses in the United States.

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