Integrates Bernard with Symfony2.
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Lock bernard dependency before 1.0 stable BC breaks
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README.md

BernardBundle

Integrates Bernard neatly with a Symfony application.

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Getting Started

Everything starts by installing the bundle. This is done through composer by adding the following lines to your composer.json file and running composer update bernard/bernard-bundle.

{
    "require" : {
        "bernard/bernard-bundle" : "~1.0"
    }
}

Next up is adding the bundle to your kernel and configuring it in config.yml.

// app/AppKernel.php
// .. previous class definition
public function registerBundles()
{
    // .. all the other bundles you have registered.
    $bundles[] = new Bernard\BernardBundle\BernardBundle();
    // .. the rest of the method
}
# .. previous content of app/config/config.yml
bernard:
    driver: file # you can choose predis, phpredis, file, doctrine, sqs etc.

Great! You are now ready to use this diddy. Go and read the rest of the documentation on Bernard at bernard.readthedocs.org.

Running the Consumer

What good is a message queue if you don't know how to run the consumer? Luckily this bundle auto registers the commands with your application. So if you run php app/console you should see bernard:consume and bernard:produce. These work just as the documentation describes but if you are in doubt just add --help when running the command.

It is important to use --no-debug when running the consumer for longer periods of time. This is because Symfony by default in debug mode collects a lot of information and logging and if this is omitted you will run into memory problems sooner or later.

Adding Receivers

In order to know what messages needs to go where you have to register some receivers. This is done with a tag in your service definitions.

my_receiver:
    class: Acme\Receiver
    # public: true # Make sure the service is public
    tags:
         - { name: bernard.receiver, message: SendNewsletter }
         - { name: bernard.receiver, message: ImportUsers }

As the example shows it is possible to register the same receiver for many different message types.

Configuration Options

There are different options that can be set that changes the behaviour for various drivers.

Doctrine

When using the doctrine driver it can be useful to use a seperate connection when using Bernard. In order to change it use the connection option. This also needs to be set if you default connection is called anything else than default.

doctrine:
    dbal:
        connections:
            bernard:
                host:     "%database_host%"
                charset:  UTF8

bernard:
    driver: doctrine
    options:
        connection: bernard # default is the default value

FlatFile

The file driver needs to know what directory it should use for storing messages and its queue metadata.

bernard:
    driver: file
    options:
        directory: %kernel.cache_dir%/bernard

The above example will dump your messages in the cache folder. In most cases you will want to change this to something because the cache folder is deleted every time the cache is cleared (obviously).

PhpAmqp / RabbitMQ

PhpAmqp depends on a service called old_sound_rabbit_mq.connection.default with a configured connection instance that extends \PhpAmqpLib\Connection\AbstractConnection class. If you want to use a different name use the phpamqp_service option:

bernard:
    driver: phpamqp
    options:
        phpamqp_service: my_phpamqp_service

You need to define the phpamqp_exchange. Optional, you can define phpamqp_default_message_parameters:

bernard:
    driver: phpamqp
    options:
        phpamqp_exchange: my_phpamqp_service
        phpamqp_default_message_parameters:
            content_type: application/json
            delivery_mode: 2

PhpRedis

PhpRedis depends on a service called snc_redis.bernard with a configured Redis instance. If you want to use a different name use the phpredis_service option:

bernard:
    driver: phpredis
    options:
        phpredis_service: my_redis_service

If you're using the SncRedisBundle you have to set logging to false for the bernhard client to ensure that is is a Redis instance and not wrapped. Also, if the consumer is throwing RedisException: read error on connection, you need to set connection_timeout (see SncRedisBundle configuration options) option to a value higher than 5 (seconds).

IronMQ

When using the IronMQ driver you have to configure an IronMQ connection instance. You can configure it like the following:

services:
    ironmq_connection:
        class: IronMQ
        arguments:
            - { token: %ironmq_token%, project_id: %ironmq_project_id% }
        public: false

bernard:
    driver: ironmq
    options:
        ironmq_service: ironmq_connection

Amazon SQS

To use Amazon SQS, configure your driver like this:

services:
    my_sqs_client:
        class: Aws\Sqs\SqsClient
        factory: Aws\Sqs\SqsClient::factory
        arguments:
            region: "your aws region" # e.g. "eu-west-1"
            key: "your aws user's key"
            secret: "your aws user's secret"

bernard:
    driver: sqs
    options:
        sqs_service: my_sqs_client
        sqs_queue_map: # optional for aliasing queue urls (default alias is the url section after the last "/"), e.g.:
            send_newsletter: https://sqs.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/...
        prefetch: 1 # optional, but beware the default is >1 and you may run into invisibility timeout problems with that

Pheanstalk

To use Pheanstalk (pda/pheanstalk), configure your driver like this:

services:
    my.pheanstalk.connection:
        class: Pheanstalk\Pheanstalk
        arguments:
            - %some.parameter.containing.pheanstalk.host%

bernard:
    driver: pheanstalk
    options:
        pheanstalk_service: my.pheanstalk.connection