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An R wrapper to the overly complicated Bitmoji API 😱
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DESCRIPTION new transparent arg; minor doc tweaks Nov 28, 2018
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README.Rmd
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README.md

RBitmoji: An R wrapper to the overly complicated Bitmoji API

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Ya, this is happening…

Installation

You can (try to) install the development version of RBitmoji from GitHub using

if (!requireNamespace("devtools")) {
  install.packages("devtools")
}
devtools::install_github("bgreenwell/RBitmoji")

Obtaining your Bitmoji ID

In order to use RBitmoji you will need your unique Bitmoji ID, which can be difficult to find. Fortunately, the get_id() function can simplify the process! TO use this function, you must supply the email address associated with your Bitmoji account. You will then be prompted to enter your Bitmoji account password using a secure blah, blah, blah. For example:

library(RBitmoji)
my_id <- get_id("greenwell.brandon@gmail.com")

If successful, your id will be stored in the variable my_id. Once that is done, you can use the plot_comic() function to do real data science.

Basic usage

If you are familiar with Bitmoji, then you know that there are hundreds of comics available for your avatar, each of which is associated with a comic id and a tag. As of right now, you can only look up and plot comics by tag, but in the future, we’ll add an id argument as well. Also, note that many comics are associated with multiple tags and vice versa, so use set.seed() for reproducibility. Below are some simple examples (the value of my_id was found using the get_id() function).

# Use set.seed() to generate the same comic everytime for a particular tag
set.seed(101)  # for reproducibility
my_id <- "1551b314-5e8a-4477-aca2-088c05963111-v1"
plot_comic(my_id, tag = "fail")

# Another example
plot_comic(my_id, tag = "time magazine")

# Some tags are associated with multiple comics
par(mfrow = c(2, 2))
for (i in 1:4) plot_comic(my_id, tag = "cool")

# Overlay comics on various plots
comic <- get_comic(my_id, tag = "volcano", transparent = TRUE)
library(ggplot2)

ggplot(iris, aes(x = Petal.Length, y = Petal.Width)) +
  geom_point(aes(color = Species)) +
  annotation_raster(comic, xmin = 1, xmax = 3, ymin = 1.5, ymax = 2.5)

# You have two ids, you can also plot comics with friends
set.seed(102)  # for reproducibility
plot_comic(c(my_id, my_id), tag = "vomit")
plot_comic(c(my_id, my_id), tag = "drink")

Inspirations

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