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README.md

Figwheel Sidecar

The following currently assumes familiarity with Figwheel and its function

Let's start with a sketch of how we can use the components in Figwheel Sidecar.

First let's use a new means configuration and create a figwheel.edn file in the root directory of our project.

{
  :http-server-root "public" ;; default
  :server-port 3449          ;; default
  :open-file-command "emacsclient"
  :builds [{:id "example", 
            :source-paths ["src"],
            :figwheel true
            :compiler
            {:main example.core,
             :asset-path "js/out",
             :output-to "resources/public/js/example.js",
             :output-dir "resources/public/js/out",
             :source-map-timestamp true}}]
}

(You can also just add your configuration via the project.clj as usual)

We'll use leiningen for dependency and classpath management and our project.clj should look like this:

(defproject example "0.1.0-SNAPSHOT"
  :description "Sidecar example"
  :dependencies [[org.clojure/clojure "1.8.0"]
                 [org.clojure/clojurescript "1.8.51"]]
  :profiles {
    :dev {
      :dependencies [[figwheel-sidecar "0.5.4-6"]]
    }
  }  
)

Start the Clojure REPL:

rlwrap lein run -m clojure.main

Loading the config

You can get the config from the figwheel.edn

=> (require '[figwheel-sidecar.system :as sys])
nil
=> (require '[clojure.pprint :refer [pprint]])
nil
=> (pprint (sys/fetch-config))
{:data
 {:figwheel-options
  {:http-server-root "public",
   :server-port 3449,
   :open-file-command "emacsclient"},
  :all-builds
  [{:id "example",
    :source-paths ["src"],
    :figwheel {:build-id "example"},
    :build-options
    {:main example.core,
     :asset-path "js/out",
     :output-to "resources/public/js/example.js",
     :output-dir "resources/public/js/out",
     :source-map-timestamp true,
     :optimizations :none}}],
  :build-ids ["example"]},
 :file "figwheel.edn"} 

fetch-config fetches the config from the figwheel.edn file and prepares it for consumption by figwheel components.

The call to fetch-config will attempt to get config first from figwheel.edn and if there is no figwheel.edn available, it will look for and read the project.clj file and attempt to get the configuration info from the :figwheel and :cljsbuild entries.

One can store and load the configuration however one wants to. fetch-config is merely a convenience.

The FigwheelSystem Component

Let's start with the simplest system that we can make:

=> (require '[com.stuartsierra.component :as component])
nil
=> (def system
     (component/system-map
       :figwheel-system (sys/figwheel-system (sys/fetch-config))))

This creates a system with a :figwheel-system in it.

Now let's start our system:

=> (alter-var-root #'system component/start)
Figwheel: Starting server at http://localhost:3449
Figwheel: Watching build - example
Compiling "resources/public/js/tryfig.js" from ["src"]...
Successfully compiled "resources/public/js/tryfig.js" in 3.247 seconds.
#<SystemMap>

To complete this simple example let's launch a Figwheel REPL:

=> (sys/cljs-repl (:figwheel-system system))
Launching ClojureScript REPL for build: example
Figwheel Controls:
          (stop-autobuild)                ;; stops Figwheel autobuilder
          (start-autobuild [id ...])      ;; starts autobuilder focused on optional ids
          (switch-to-build id ...)        ;; switches autobuilder to different build
          (reset-autobuild)               ;; stops, cleans, and starts autobuilder
          (reload-config)                 ;; reloads build config and resets autobuild
          (build-once [id ...])           ;; builds source one time
          (clean-builds [id ..])          ;; deletes compiled cljs target files
          (print-config [id ...])         ;; prints out build configurations
          (fig-status)                    ;; displays current state of system
  Switch REPL build focus:
          :cljs/quit                      ;; allows you to switch REPL to another build
    Docs: (doc function-name-here)
    Exit: Control+C or :cljs/quit
 Results: Stored in vars *1, *2, *3, *e holds last exception object
Prompt will show when Figwheel connects to your application
To quit, type: :cljs/quit
cljs.user=> (+ 1 2)
3
cljs.user=> :cljs/quit

Remember that you won't see the REPL prompt until the repl connects to your running application.

Sweet! Now you have all the functionality of Figwheel within the context of a system map. This gives you the freedom to add arbitrary components according to your need.

Let's stop this system in preparation for building another one.

(alter-var-root #'system component/stop)
Figwheel: Stopped watching build - example
Figwheel: Stopping Websocket Server
Mon Oct 26 10:41:31 EDT 2015 [main] ERROR - increase :queue-size if this happens often
java.util.concurrent.RejectedExecutionException:
....

This exception is expected

Adding the CSS Watcher component

The figwheel-system doesn't include css watching but we can add the CSS watching as a separate component.

and now let's define a system with a CSS Watcher:

(def system
  (component/system-map
    :figwheel-system (sys/figwheel-system (sys/fetch-config))
    :css-watcher (sys/css-watcher {:watch-paths ["resources/public/css"]})))

The call to sys/css-watcher will create a file watcher that observes changes in the :watch-paths and then fires off notifications to listening figwheel clients.

And we can start this as well:

=> (alter-var-root #'system component/start)
Figwheel: Starting server at http://localhost:3449
Figwheel: Watching build - example
Compiling "resources/public/js/tryfig.js" from ["src"]...
Successfully compiled "resources/public/js/tryfig.js" in 0.658 seconds.
Figwheel: Starting CSS Watcher for paths  ["resources/public/css"]
#<SystemMap>

The main idea here is that the :figwheel-server is the single dependent for other components that want to send messages to the client.

Starting the REPL

Now that we have a system with some builds running we can start a Figwheel REPL.

=> (sys/cljs-repl (:figwheel-system system))
Launching ClojureScript REPL for build: example
Figwheel Controls:
          (stop-autobuild)                ;; stops Figwheel autobuilder
          (start-autobuild [id ...])      ;; starts autobuilder focused on optional ids
          (switch-to-build id ...)        ;; switches autobuilder to different build
          (reset-autobuild)               ;; stops, cleans, and starts autobuilder
          (reload-config)                 ;; reloads build config and resets autobuild
          (build-once [id ...])           ;; builds source one time
          (clean-builds [id ..])          ;; deletes compiled cljs target files
          (print-config [id ...])         ;; prints out build configurations
          (fig-status)                    ;; displays current state of system
  Switch REPL build focus:
          :cljs/quit                      ;; allows you to switch REPL to another build
    Docs: (doc function-name-here)
    Exit: Control+C or :cljs/quit
 Results: Stored in vars *1, *2, *3, *e holds last exception object
Prompt will show when Figwheel connects to your application
To quit, type: :cljs/quit
cljs.user=> (+ 1 2)
3

There is only one build in our configuration so the build switching repl doesn't offer us much.

Creating a component that communicates with the Figwheel client

Let's make a simple component that periodically sends the current server side time to the client. This has no practical value but will just server as an example.

(ns example.push-time-service
  (:require
    [com.stuartsierra.component :as component]
    [figwheel-sidecar.components.figwheel-server :as server]
    [clojure.core.async :refer [go-loop timeout]]))

(defrecord PushTimeService [figwheel-system]
  component/Lifecycle
  (start [this]
    (if-not (:time-service-run this)
      (let [run-atom (atom true)]
        (go-loop []
          (when run-atom
            (server/send-message figwheel-system
                                 ::server/broadcast
                                 {:msg-name :time-push :time (java.util.Date.)})
             (timeout 1000)
             (recur)))
       (assoc this :time-service-run run-atom))
     this))
   (stop [this]
     (if (:time-service-run this)
        (do (reset! (:time-service-run this) false)
            (dissoc this :time-service-run))
        this)))

This creates a service that sends a periodic message to all connected figwheel clients.

Let's add this to our system map.

(def system
  (component/system-map
    :figwheel-system (sys/figwheel-system (sys/fetch-config))
    :css-watcher (sys/css-watcher {:watch-paths ["resources/public/css"]})
    :time-pusher
    (component/using
      (PushTimeService.)
      [:figwheel-system])))

In the example above I am broadcasting the message if you want to target a certain build just replace the ::server/broadcast above with the build id ("example" is build id from the config above).

Now let's listen for this message on the client. You will need to add the following to your ClojureScript project source. You will probably want to create a development build that includes the source directory that contains a source file as follows.

(ns push-time.core
  (:require [figwheel.client :as fig]))
  
(fig/add-message-watch
  :time-pusher
  (fn [{:keys [msg-name] :as msg}]
    (when (= msg-name :time-push)
      (println "Received time message:" (prn-str (:time msg))))))

This will add a listener and whenever you receive a :time-push message it will be printed in the console of the client.

Communicating with the figwheel client via Figwheel server should only be used for development tooling. Figwheel is not intended to provide support for application communication.