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add proper Test suite to local inc as a backup

svn path=/Bio-FeatureIO/trunk/; revision=16848
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1 parent 447b361 commit b838bf54ea70ec56e46416f3385ff06d3dc79f11 cjfields committed Feb 18, 2010
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2,501 inc/Test/Builder.pm
@@ -0,0 +1,2501 @@
+package Test::Builder;
+
+use 5.006;
+use strict;
+use warnings;
+
+our $VERSION = '0.94';
+$VERSION = eval $VERSION; ## no critic (BuiltinFunctions::ProhibitStringyEval)
+
+BEGIN {
+ if( $] < 5.008 ) {
+ require Test::Builder::IO::Scalar;
+ }
+}
+
+
+# Make Test::Builder thread-safe for ithreads.
+BEGIN {
+ use Config;
+ # Load threads::shared when threads are turned on.
+ # 5.8.0's threads are so busted we no longer support them.
+ if( $] >= 5.008001 && $Config{useithreads} && $INC{'threads.pm'} ) {
+ require threads::shared;
+
+ # Hack around YET ANOTHER threads::shared bug. It would
+ # occassionally forget the contents of the variable when sharing it.
+ # So we first copy the data, then share, then put our copy back.
+ *share = sub (\[$@%]) {
+ my $type = ref $_[0];
+ my $data;
+
+ if( $type eq 'HASH' ) {
+ %$data = %{ $_[0] };
+ }
+ elsif( $type eq 'ARRAY' ) {
+ @$data = @{ $_[0] };
+ }
+ elsif( $type eq 'SCALAR' ) {
+ $$data = ${ $_[0] };
+ }
+ else {
+ die( "Unknown type: " . $type );
+ }
+
+ $_[0] = &threads::shared::share( $_[0] );
+
+ if( $type eq 'HASH' ) {
+ %{ $_[0] } = %$data;
+ }
+ elsif( $type eq 'ARRAY' ) {
+ @{ $_[0] } = @$data;
+ }
+ elsif( $type eq 'SCALAR' ) {
+ ${ $_[0] } = $$data;
+ }
+ else {
+ die( "Unknown type: " . $type );
+ }
+
+ return $_[0];
+ };
+ }
+ # 5.8.0's threads::shared is busted when threads are off
+ # and earlier Perls just don't have that module at all.
+ else {
+ *share = sub { return $_[0] };
+ *lock = sub { 0 };
+ }
+}
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+Test::Builder - Backend for building test libraries
+
+=head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+ package My::Test::Module;
+ use base 'Test::Builder::Module';
+
+ my $CLASS = __PACKAGE__;
+
+ sub ok {
+ my($test, $name) = @_;
+ my $tb = $CLASS->builder;
+
+ $tb->ok($test, $name);
+ }
+
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+Test::Simple and Test::More have proven to be popular testing modules,
+but they're not always flexible enough. Test::Builder provides the a
+building block upon which to write your own test libraries I<which can
+work together>.
+
+=head2 Construction
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<new>
+
+ my $Test = Test::Builder->new;
+
+Returns a Test::Builder object representing the current state of the
+test.
+
+Since you only run one test per program C<new> always returns the same
+Test::Builder object. No matter how many times you call C<new()>, you're
+getting the same object. This is called a singleton. This is done so that
+multiple modules share such global information as the test counter and
+where test output is going.
+
+If you want a completely new Test::Builder object different from the
+singleton, use C<create>.
+
+=cut
+
+our $Test = Test::Builder->new;
+
+sub new {
+ my($class) = shift;
+ $Test ||= $class->create;
+ return $Test;
+}
+
+=item B<create>
+
+ my $Test = Test::Builder->create;
+
+Ok, so there can be more than one Test::Builder object and this is how
+you get it. You might use this instead of C<new()> if you're testing
+a Test::Builder based module, but otherwise you probably want C<new>.
+
+B<NOTE>: the implementation is not complete. C<level>, for example, is
+still shared amongst B<all> Test::Builder objects, even ones created using
+this method. Also, the method name may change in the future.
+
+=cut
+
+sub create {
+ my $class = shift;
+
+ my $self = bless {}, $class;
+ $self->reset;
+
+ return $self;
+}
+
+=item B<child>
+
+ my $child = $builder->child($name_of_child);
+ $child->plan( tests => 4 );
+ $child->ok(some_code());
+ ...
+ $child->finalize;
+
+Returns a new instance of C<Test::Builder>. Any output from this child will
+indented four spaces more than the parent's indentation. When done, the
+C<finalize> method I<must> be called explicitly.
+
+Trying to create a new child with a previous child still active (i.e.,
+C<finalize> not called) will C<croak>.
+
+Trying to run a test when you have an open child will also C<croak> and cause
+the test suite to fail.
+
+=cut
+
+sub child {
+ my( $self, $name ) = @_;
+
+ if( $self->{Child_Name} ) {
+ $self->croak("You already have a child named ($self->{Child_Name}) running");
+ }
+
+ my $child = bless {}, ref $self;
+ $child->reset;
+
+ # Add to our indentation
+ $child->_indent( $self->_indent . ' ' );
+ $child->{$_} = $self->{$_} foreach qw{Out_FH Todo_FH Fail_FH};
+
+ # This will be reset in finalize. We do this here lest one child failure
+ # cause all children to fail.
+ $child->{Child_Error} = $?;
+ $? = 0;
+ $child->{Parent} = $self;
+ $child->{Name} = $name || "Child of " . $self->name;
+ $self->{Child_Name} = $child->name;
+ return $child;
+}
+
+
+=item B<subtest>
+
+ $builder->subtest($name, \&subtests);
+
+See documentation of C<subtest> in Test::More.
+
+=cut
+
+sub subtest {
+ my $self = shift;
+ my($name, $subtests) = @_;
+
+ if ('CODE' ne ref $subtests) {
+ $self->croak("subtest()'s second argument must be a code ref");
+ }
+
+ # Turn the child into the parent so anyone who has stored a copy of
+ # the Test::Builder singleton will get the child.
+ my $child = $self->child($name);
+ my %parent = %$self;
+ %$self = %$child;
+
+ my $error;
+ if( !eval { $subtests->(); 1 } ) {
+ $error = $@;
+ }
+
+ # Restore the parent and the copied child.
+ %$child = %$self;
+ %$self = %parent;
+
+ # Die *after* we restore the parent.
+ die $error if $error and !eval { $error->isa('Test::Builder::Exception') };
+
+ return $child->finalize;
+}
+
+
+=item B<finalize>
+
+ my $ok = $child->finalize;
+
+When your child is done running tests, you must call C<finalize> to clean up
+and tell the parent your pass/fail status.
+
+Calling finalize on a child with open children will C<croak>.
+
+If the child falls out of scope before C<finalize> is called, a failure
+diagnostic will be issued and the child is considered to have failed.
+
+No attempt to call methods on a child after C<finalize> is called is
+guaranteed to succeed.
+
+Calling this on the root builder is a no-op.
+
+=cut
+
+sub finalize {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ return unless $self->parent;
+ if( $self->{Child_Name} ) {
+ $self->croak("Can't call finalize() with child ($self->{Child_Name}) active");
+ }
+ $self->_ending;
+
+ # XXX This will only be necessary for TAP envelopes (we think)
+ #$self->_print( $self->is_passing ? "PASS\n" : "FAIL\n" );
+
+ my $ok = 1;
+ $self->parent->{Child_Name} = undef;
+ if ( $self->{Skip_All} ) {
+ $self->parent->skip($self->{Skip_All});
+ }
+ elsif ( not @{ $self->{Test_Results} } ) {
+ $self->parent->ok( 0, sprintf q[No tests run for subtest "%s"], $self->name );
+ }
+ else {
+ $self->parent->ok( $self->is_passing, $self->name );
+ }
+ $? = $self->{Child_Error};
+ delete $self->{Parent};
+
+ return $self->is_passing;
+}
+
+sub _indent {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ if( @_ ) {
+ $self->{Indent} = shift;
+ }
+
+ return $self->{Indent};
+}
+
+=item B<parent>
+
+ if ( my $parent = $builder->parent ) {
+ ...
+ }
+
+Returns the parent C<Test::Builder> instance, if any. Only used with child
+builders for nested TAP.
+
+=cut
+
+sub parent { shift->{Parent} }
+
+=item B<name>
+
+ diag $builder->name;
+
+Returns the name of the current builder. Top level builders default to C<$0>
+(the name of the executable). Child builders are named via the C<child>
+method. If no name is supplied, will be named "Child of $parent->name".
+
+=cut
+
+sub name { shift->{Name} }
+
+sub DESTROY {
+ my $self = shift;
+ if ( $self->parent ) {
+ my $name = $self->name;
+ $self->diag(<<"FAIL");
+Child ($name) exited without calling finalize()
+FAIL
+ $self->parent->{In_Destroy} = 1;
+ $self->parent->ok(0, $name);
+ }
+}
+
+=item B<reset>
+
+ $Test->reset;
+
+Reinitializes the Test::Builder singleton to its original state.
+Mostly useful for tests run in persistent environments where the same
+test might be run multiple times in the same process.
+
+=cut
+
+our $Level;
+
+sub reset { ## no critic (Subroutines::ProhibitBuiltinHomonyms)
+ my($self) = @_;
+
+ # We leave this a global because it has to be localized and localizing
+ # hash keys is just asking for pain. Also, it was documented.
+ $Level = 1;
+
+ $self->{Name} = $0;
+ $self->is_passing(1);
+ $self->{Ending} = 0;
+ $self->{Have_Plan} = 0;
+ $self->{No_Plan} = 0;
+ $self->{Have_Output_Plan} = 0;
+
+ $self->{Original_Pid} = $$;
+ $self->{Child_Name} = undef;
+ $self->{Indent} ||= '';
+
+ share( $self->{Curr_Test} );
+ $self->{Curr_Test} = 0;
+ $self->{Test_Results} = &share( [] );
+
+ $self->{Exported_To} = undef;
+ $self->{Expected_Tests} = 0;
+
+ $self->{Skip_All} = 0;
+
+ $self->{Use_Nums} = 1;
+
+ $self->{No_Header} = 0;
+ $self->{No_Ending} = 0;
+
+ $self->{Todo} = undef;
+ $self->{Todo_Stack} = [];
+ $self->{Start_Todo} = 0;
+ $self->{Opened_Testhandles} = 0;
+
+ $self->_dup_stdhandles;
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Setting up tests
+
+These methods are for setting up tests and declaring how many there
+are. You usually only want to call one of these methods.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<plan>
+
+ $Test->plan('no_plan');
+ $Test->plan( skip_all => $reason );
+ $Test->plan( tests => $num_tests );
+
+A convenient way to set up your tests. Call this and Test::Builder
+will print the appropriate headers and take the appropriate actions.
+
+If you call C<plan()>, don't call any of the other methods below.
+
+If a child calls "skip_all" in the plan, a C<Test::Builder::Exception> is
+thrown. Trap this error, call C<finalize()> and don't run any more tests on
+the child.
+
+ my $child = $Test->child('some child');
+ eval { $child->plan( $condition ? ( skip_all => $reason ) : ( tests => 3 ) ) };
+ if ( eval { $@->isa('Test::Builder::Exception') } ) {
+ $child->finalize;
+ return;
+ }
+ # run your tests
+
+=cut
+
+my %plan_cmds = (
+ no_plan => \&no_plan,
+ skip_all => \&skip_all,
+ tests => \&_plan_tests,
+);
+
+sub plan {
+ my( $self, $cmd, $arg ) = @_;
+
+ return unless $cmd;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+
+ $self->croak("You tried to plan twice") if $self->{Have_Plan};
+
+ if( my $method = $plan_cmds{$cmd} ) {
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ $self->$method($arg);
+ }
+ else {
+ my @args = grep { defined } ( $cmd, $arg );
+ $self->croak("plan() doesn't understand @args");
+ }
+
+ return 1;
+}
+
+
+sub _plan_tests {
+ my($self, $arg) = @_;
+
+ if($arg) {
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->expected_tests($arg);
+ }
+ elsif( !defined $arg ) {
+ $self->croak("Got an undefined number of tests");
+ }
+ else {
+ $self->croak("You said to run 0 tests");
+ }
+
+ return;
+}
+
+
+=item B<expected_tests>
+
+ my $max = $Test->expected_tests;
+ $Test->expected_tests($max);
+
+Gets/sets the number of tests we expect this test to run and prints out
+the appropriate headers.
+
+=cut
+
+sub expected_tests {
+ my $self = shift;
+ my($max) = @_;
+
+ if(@_) {
+ $self->croak("Number of tests must be a positive integer. You gave it '$max'")
+ unless $max =~ /^\+?\d+$/;
+
+ $self->{Expected_Tests} = $max;
+ $self->{Have_Plan} = 1;
+
+ $self->_output_plan($max) unless $self->no_header;
+ }
+ return $self->{Expected_Tests};
+}
+
+=item B<no_plan>
+
+ $Test->no_plan;
+
+Declares that this test will run an indeterminate number of tests.
+
+=cut
+
+sub no_plan {
+ my($self, $arg) = @_;
+
+ $self->carp("no_plan takes no arguments") if $arg;
+
+ $self->{No_Plan} = 1;
+ $self->{Have_Plan} = 1;
+
+ return 1;
+}
+
+
+=begin private
+
+=item B<_output_plan>
+
+ $tb->_output_plan($max);
+ $tb->_output_plan($max, $directive);
+ $tb->_output_plan($max, $directive => $reason);
+
+Handles displaying the test plan.
+
+If a C<$directive> and/or C<$reason> are given they will be output with the
+plan. So here's what skipping all tests looks like:
+
+ $tb->_output_plan(0, "SKIP", "Because I said so");
+
+It sets C<< $tb->{Have_Output_Plan} >> and will croak if the plan was already
+output.
+
+=end private
+
+=cut
+
+sub _output_plan {
+ my($self, $max, $directive, $reason) = @_;
+
+ $self->carp("The plan was already output") if $self->{Have_Output_Plan};
+
+ my $plan = "1..$max";
+ $plan .= " # $directive" if defined $directive;
+ $plan .= " $reason" if defined $reason;
+
+ $self->_print("$plan\n");
+
+ $self->{Have_Output_Plan} = 1;
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item B<done_testing>
+
+ $Test->done_testing();
+ $Test->done_testing($num_tests);
+
+Declares that you are done testing, no more tests will be run after this point.
+
+If a plan has not yet been output, it will do so.
+
+$num_tests is the number of tests you planned to run. If a numbered
+plan was already declared, and if this contradicts, a failing test
+will be run to reflect the planning mistake. If C<no_plan> was declared,
+this will override.
+
+If C<done_testing()> is called twice, the second call will issue a
+failing test.
+
+If C<$num_tests> is omitted, the number of tests run will be used, like
+no_plan.
+
+C<done_testing()> is, in effect, used when you'd want to use C<no_plan>, but
+safer. You'd use it like so:
+
+ $Test->ok($a == $b);
+ $Test->done_testing();
+
+Or to plan a variable number of tests:
+
+ for my $test (@tests) {
+ $Test->ok($test);
+ }
+ $Test->done_testing(@tests);
+
+=cut
+
+sub done_testing {
+ my($self, $num_tests) = @_;
+
+ # If done_testing() specified the number of tests, shut off no_plan.
+ if( defined $num_tests ) {
+ $self->{No_Plan} = 0;
+ }
+ else {
+ $num_tests = $self->current_test;
+ }
+
+ if( $self->{Done_Testing} ) {
+ my($file, $line) = @{$self->{Done_Testing}}[1,2];
+ $self->ok(0, "done_testing() was already called at $file line $line");
+ return;
+ }
+
+ $self->{Done_Testing} = [caller];
+
+ if( $self->expected_tests && $num_tests != $self->expected_tests ) {
+ $self->ok(0, "planned to run @{[ $self->expected_tests ]} ".
+ "but done_testing() expects $num_tests");
+ }
+ else {
+ $self->{Expected_Tests} = $num_tests;
+ }
+
+ $self->_output_plan($num_tests) unless $self->{Have_Output_Plan};
+
+ $self->{Have_Plan} = 1;
+
+ # The wrong number of tests were run
+ $self->is_passing(0) if $self->{Expected_Tests} != $self->{Curr_Test};
+
+ # No tests were run
+ $self->is_passing(0) if $self->{Curr_Test} == 0;
+
+ return 1;
+}
+
+
+=item B<has_plan>
+
+ $plan = $Test->has_plan
+
+Find out whether a plan has been defined. C<$plan> is either C<undef> (no plan
+has been set), C<no_plan> (indeterminate # of tests) or an integer (the number
+of expected tests).
+
+=cut
+
+sub has_plan {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ return( $self->{Expected_Tests} ) if $self->{Expected_Tests};
+ return('no_plan') if $self->{No_Plan};
+ return(undef);
+}
+
+=item B<skip_all>
+
+ $Test->skip_all;
+ $Test->skip_all($reason);
+
+Skips all the tests, using the given C<$reason>. Exits immediately with 0.
+
+=cut
+
+sub skip_all {
+ my( $self, $reason ) = @_;
+
+ $self->{Skip_All} = $self->parent ? $reason : 1;
+
+ $self->_output_plan(0, "SKIP", $reason) unless $self->no_header;
+ if ( $self->parent ) {
+ die bless {} => 'Test::Builder::Exception';
+ }
+ exit(0);
+}
+
+=item B<exported_to>
+
+ my $pack = $Test->exported_to;
+ $Test->exported_to($pack);
+
+Tells Test::Builder what package you exported your functions to.
+
+This method isn't terribly useful since modules which share the same
+Test::Builder object might get exported to different packages and only
+the last one will be honored.
+
+=cut
+
+sub exported_to {
+ my( $self, $pack ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $pack ) {
+ $self->{Exported_To} = $pack;
+ }
+ return $self->{Exported_To};
+}
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Running tests
+
+These actually run the tests, analogous to the functions in Test::More.
+
+They all return true if the test passed, false if the test failed.
+
+C<$name> is always optional.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<ok>
+
+ $Test->ok($test, $name);
+
+Your basic test. Pass if C<$test> is true, fail if $test is false. Just
+like Test::Simple's C<ok()>.
+
+=cut
+
+sub ok {
+ my( $self, $test, $name ) = @_;
+
+ if ( $self->{Child_Name} and not $self->{In_Destroy} ) {
+ $name = 'unnamed test' unless defined $name;
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ $self->croak("Cannot run test ($name) with active children");
+ }
+ # $test might contain an object which we don't want to accidentally
+ # store, so we turn it into a boolean.
+ $test = $test ? 1 : 0;
+
+ lock $self->{Curr_Test};
+ $self->{Curr_Test}++;
+
+ # In case $name is a string overloaded object, force it to stringify.
+ $self->_unoverload_str( \$name );
+
+ $self->diag(<<"ERR") if defined $name and $name =~ /^[\d\s]+$/;
+ You named your test '$name'. You shouldn't use numbers for your test names.
+ Very confusing.
+ERR
+
+ # Capture the value of $TODO for the rest of this ok() call
+ # so it can more easily be found by other routines.
+ my $todo = $self->todo();
+ my $in_todo = $self->in_todo;
+ local $self->{Todo} = $todo if $in_todo;
+
+ $self->_unoverload_str( \$todo );
+
+ my $out;
+ my $result = &share( {} );
+
+ unless($test) {
+ $out .= "not ";
+ @$result{ 'ok', 'actual_ok' } = ( ( $self->in_todo ? 1 : 0 ), 0 );
+ }
+ else {
+ @$result{ 'ok', 'actual_ok' } = ( 1, $test );
+ }
+
+ $out .= "ok";
+ $out .= " $self->{Curr_Test}" if $self->use_numbers;
+
+ if( defined $name ) {
+ $name =~ s|#|\\#|g; # # in a name can confuse Test::Harness.
+ $out .= " - $name";
+ $result->{name} = $name;
+ }
+ else {
+ $result->{name} = '';
+ }
+
+ if( $self->in_todo ) {
+ $out .= " # TODO $todo";
+ $result->{reason} = $todo;
+ $result->{type} = 'todo';
+ }
+ else {
+ $result->{reason} = '';
+ $result->{type} = '';
+ }
+
+ $self->{Test_Results}[ $self->{Curr_Test} - 1 ] = $result;
+ $out .= "\n";
+
+ $self->_print($out);
+
+ unless($test) {
+ my $msg = $self->in_todo ? "Failed (TODO)" : "Failed";
+ $self->_print_to_fh( $self->_diag_fh, "\n" ) if $ENV{HARNESS_ACTIVE};
+
+ my( undef, $file, $line ) = $self->caller;
+ if( defined $name ) {
+ $self->diag(qq[ $msg test '$name'\n]);
+ $self->diag(qq[ at $file line $line.\n]);
+ }
+ else {
+ $self->diag(qq[ $msg test at $file line $line.\n]);
+ }
+ }
+
+ $self->is_passing(0) unless $test || $self->in_todo;
+
+ # Check that we haven't violated the plan
+ $self->_check_is_passing_plan();
+
+ return $test ? 1 : 0;
+}
+
+
+# Check that we haven't yet violated the plan and set
+# is_passing() accordingly
+sub _check_is_passing_plan {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ my $plan = $self->has_plan;
+ return unless defined $plan; # no plan yet defined
+ return unless $plan !~ /\D/; # no numeric plan
+ $self->is_passing(0) if $plan < $self->{Curr_Test};
+}
+
+
+sub _unoverload {
+ my $self = shift;
+ my $type = shift;
+
+ $self->_try(sub { require overload; }, die_on_fail => 1);
+
+ foreach my $thing (@_) {
+ if( $self->_is_object($$thing) ) {
+ if( my $string_meth = overload::Method( $$thing, $type ) ) {
+ $$thing = $$thing->$string_meth();
+ }
+ }
+ }
+
+ return;
+}
+
+sub _is_object {
+ my( $self, $thing ) = @_;
+
+ return $self->_try( sub { ref $thing && $thing->isa('UNIVERSAL') } ) ? 1 : 0;
+}
+
+sub _unoverload_str {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ return $self->_unoverload( q[""], @_ );
+}
+
+sub _unoverload_num {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ $self->_unoverload( '0+', @_ );
+
+ for my $val (@_) {
+ next unless $self->_is_dualvar($$val);
+ $$val = $$val + 0;
+ }
+
+ return;
+}
+
+# This is a hack to detect a dualvar such as $!
+sub _is_dualvar {
+ my( $self, $val ) = @_;
+
+ # Objects are not dualvars.
+ return 0 if ref $val;
+
+ no warnings 'numeric';
+ my $numval = $val + 0;
+ return $numval != 0 and $numval ne $val ? 1 : 0;
+}
+
+=item B<is_eq>
+
+ $Test->is_eq($got, $expected, $name);
+
+Like Test::More's C<is()>. Checks if C<$got eq $expected>. This is the
+string version.
+
+=item B<is_num>
+
+ $Test->is_num($got, $expected, $name);
+
+Like Test::More's C<is()>. Checks if C<$got == $expected>. This is the
+numeric version.
+
+=cut
+
+sub is_eq {
+ my( $self, $got, $expect, $name ) = @_;
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+
+ $self->_unoverload_str( \$got, \$expect );
+
+ if( !defined $got || !defined $expect ) {
+ # undef only matches undef and nothing else
+ my $test = !defined $got && !defined $expect;
+
+ $self->ok( $test, $name );
+ $self->_is_diag( $got, 'eq', $expect ) unless $test;
+ return $test;
+ }
+
+ return $self->cmp_ok( $got, 'eq', $expect, $name );
+}
+
+sub is_num {
+ my( $self, $got, $expect, $name ) = @_;
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+
+ $self->_unoverload_num( \$got, \$expect );
+
+ if( !defined $got || !defined $expect ) {
+ # undef only matches undef and nothing else
+ my $test = !defined $got && !defined $expect;
+
+ $self->ok( $test, $name );
+ $self->_is_diag( $got, '==', $expect ) unless $test;
+ return $test;
+ }
+
+ return $self->cmp_ok( $got, '==', $expect, $name );
+}
+
+sub _diag_fmt {
+ my( $self, $type, $val ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $$val ) {
+ if( $type eq 'eq' or $type eq 'ne' ) {
+ # quote and force string context
+ $$val = "'$$val'";
+ }
+ else {
+ # force numeric context
+ $self->_unoverload_num($val);
+ }
+ }
+ else {
+ $$val = 'undef';
+ }
+
+ return;
+}
+
+sub _is_diag {
+ my( $self, $got, $type, $expect ) = @_;
+
+ $self->_diag_fmt( $type, $_ ) for \$got, \$expect;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->diag(<<"DIAGNOSTIC");
+ got: $got
+ expected: $expect
+DIAGNOSTIC
+
+}
+
+sub _isnt_diag {
+ my( $self, $got, $type ) = @_;
+
+ $self->_diag_fmt( $type, \$got );
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->diag(<<"DIAGNOSTIC");
+ got: $got
+ expected: anything else
+DIAGNOSTIC
+}
+
+=item B<isnt_eq>
+
+ $Test->isnt_eq($got, $dont_expect, $name);
+
+Like Test::More's C<isnt()>. Checks if C<$got ne $dont_expect>. This is
+the string version.
+
+=item B<isnt_num>
+
+ $Test->isnt_num($got, $dont_expect, $name);
+
+Like Test::More's C<isnt()>. Checks if C<$got ne $dont_expect>. This is
+the numeric version.
+
+=cut
+
+sub isnt_eq {
+ my( $self, $got, $dont_expect, $name ) = @_;
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+
+ if( !defined $got || !defined $dont_expect ) {
+ # undef only matches undef and nothing else
+ my $test = defined $got || defined $dont_expect;
+
+ $self->ok( $test, $name );
+ $self->_isnt_diag( $got, 'ne' ) unless $test;
+ return $test;
+ }
+
+ return $self->cmp_ok( $got, 'ne', $dont_expect, $name );
+}
+
+sub isnt_num {
+ my( $self, $got, $dont_expect, $name ) = @_;
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+
+ if( !defined $got || !defined $dont_expect ) {
+ # undef only matches undef and nothing else
+ my $test = defined $got || defined $dont_expect;
+
+ $self->ok( $test, $name );
+ $self->_isnt_diag( $got, '!=' ) unless $test;
+ return $test;
+ }
+
+ return $self->cmp_ok( $got, '!=', $dont_expect, $name );
+}
+
+=item B<like>
+
+ $Test->like($this, qr/$regex/, $name);
+ $Test->like($this, '/$regex/', $name);
+
+Like Test::More's C<like()>. Checks if $this matches the given C<$regex>.
+
+=item B<unlike>
+
+ $Test->unlike($this, qr/$regex/, $name);
+ $Test->unlike($this, '/$regex/', $name);
+
+Like Test::More's C<unlike()>. Checks if $this B<does not match> the
+given C<$regex>.
+
+=cut
+
+sub like {
+ my( $self, $this, $regex, $name ) = @_;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->_regex_ok( $this, $regex, '=~', $name );
+}
+
+sub unlike {
+ my( $self, $this, $regex, $name ) = @_;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->_regex_ok( $this, $regex, '!~', $name );
+}
+
+=item B<cmp_ok>
+
+ $Test->cmp_ok($this, $type, $that, $name);
+
+Works just like Test::More's C<cmp_ok()>.
+
+ $Test->cmp_ok($big_num, '!=', $other_big_num);
+
+=cut
+
+my %numeric_cmps = map { ( $_, 1 ) } ( "<", "<=", ">", ">=", "==", "!=", "<=>" );
+
+sub cmp_ok {
+ my( $self, $got, $type, $expect, $name ) = @_;
+
+ my $test;
+ my $error;
+ {
+ ## no critic (BuiltinFunctions::ProhibitStringyEval)
+
+ local( $@, $!, $SIG{__DIE__} ); # isolate eval
+
+ my($pack, $file, $line) = $self->caller();
+
+ $test = eval qq[
+#line 1 "cmp_ok [from $file line $line]"
+\$got $type \$expect;
+];
+ $error = $@;
+ }
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ my $ok = $self->ok( $test, $name );
+
+ # Treat overloaded objects as numbers if we're asked to do a
+ # numeric comparison.
+ my $unoverload
+ = $numeric_cmps{$type}
+ ? '_unoverload_num'
+ : '_unoverload_str';
+
+ $self->diag(<<"END") if $error;
+An error occurred while using $type:
+------------------------------------
+$error
+------------------------------------
+END
+
+ unless($ok) {
+ $self->$unoverload( \$got, \$expect );
+
+ if( $type =~ /^(eq|==)$/ ) {
+ $self->_is_diag( $got, $type, $expect );
+ }
+ elsif( $type =~ /^(ne|!=)$/ ) {
+ $self->_isnt_diag( $got, $type );
+ }
+ else {
+ $self->_cmp_diag( $got, $type, $expect );
+ }
+ }
+ return $ok;
+}
+
+sub _cmp_diag {
+ my( $self, $got, $type, $expect ) = @_;
+
+ $got = defined $got ? "'$got'" : 'undef';
+ $expect = defined $expect ? "'$expect'" : 'undef';
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->diag(<<"DIAGNOSTIC");
+ $got
+ $type
+ $expect
+DIAGNOSTIC
+}
+
+sub _caller_context {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ my( $pack, $file, $line ) = $self->caller(1);
+
+ my $code = '';
+ $code .= "#line $line $file\n" if defined $file and defined $line;
+
+ return $code;
+}
+
+=back
+
+
+=head2 Other Testing Methods
+
+These are methods which are used in the course of writing a test but are not themselves tests.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<BAIL_OUT>
+
+ $Test->BAIL_OUT($reason);
+
+Indicates to the Test::Harness that things are going so badly all
+testing should terminate. This includes running any additional test
+scripts.
+
+It will exit with 255.
+
+=cut
+
+sub BAIL_OUT {
+ my( $self, $reason ) = @_;
+
+ $self->{Bailed_Out} = 1;
+ $self->_print("Bail out! $reason");
+ exit 255;
+}
+
+=for deprecated
+BAIL_OUT() used to be BAILOUT()
+
+=cut
+
+{
+ no warnings 'once';
+ *BAILOUT = \&BAIL_OUT;
+}
+
+=item B<skip>
+
+ $Test->skip;
+ $Test->skip($why);
+
+Skips the current test, reporting C<$why>.
+
+=cut
+
+sub skip {
+ my( $self, $why ) = @_;
+ $why ||= '';
+ $self->_unoverload_str( \$why );
+
+ lock( $self->{Curr_Test} );
+ $self->{Curr_Test}++;
+
+ $self->{Test_Results}[ $self->{Curr_Test} - 1 ] = &share(
+ {
+ 'ok' => 1,
+ actual_ok => 1,
+ name => '',
+ type => 'skip',
+ reason => $why,
+ }
+ );
+
+ my $out = "ok";
+ $out .= " $self->{Curr_Test}" if $self->use_numbers;
+ $out .= " # skip";
+ $out .= " $why" if length $why;
+ $out .= "\n";
+
+ $self->_print($out);
+
+ return 1;
+}
+
+=item B<todo_skip>
+
+ $Test->todo_skip;
+ $Test->todo_skip($why);
+
+Like C<skip()>, only it will declare the test as failing and TODO. Similar
+to
+
+ print "not ok $tnum # TODO $why\n";
+
+=cut
+
+sub todo_skip {
+ my( $self, $why ) = @_;
+ $why ||= '';
+
+ lock( $self->{Curr_Test} );
+ $self->{Curr_Test}++;
+
+ $self->{Test_Results}[ $self->{Curr_Test} - 1 ] = &share(
+ {
+ 'ok' => 1,
+ actual_ok => 0,
+ name => '',
+ type => 'todo_skip',
+ reason => $why,
+ }
+ );
+
+ my $out = "not ok";
+ $out .= " $self->{Curr_Test}" if $self->use_numbers;
+ $out .= " # TODO & SKIP $why\n";
+
+ $self->_print($out);
+
+ return 1;
+}
+
+=begin _unimplemented
+
+=item B<skip_rest>
+
+ $Test->skip_rest;
+ $Test->skip_rest($reason);
+
+Like C<skip()>, only it skips all the rest of the tests you plan to run
+and terminates the test.
+
+If you're running under C<no_plan>, it skips once and terminates the
+test.
+
+=end _unimplemented
+
+=back
+
+
+=head2 Test building utility methods
+
+These methods are useful when writing your own test methods.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<maybe_regex>
+
+ $Test->maybe_regex(qr/$regex/);
+ $Test->maybe_regex('/$regex/');
+
+This method used to be useful back when Test::Builder worked on Perls
+before 5.6 which didn't have qr//. Now its pretty useless.
+
+Convenience method for building testing functions that take regular
+expressions as arguments.
+
+Takes a quoted regular expression produced by C<qr//>, or a string
+representing a regular expression.
+
+Returns a Perl value which may be used instead of the corresponding
+regular expression, or C<undef> if its argument is not recognised.
+
+For example, a version of C<like()>, sans the useful diagnostic messages,
+could be written as:
+
+ sub laconic_like {
+ my ($self, $this, $regex, $name) = @_;
+ my $usable_regex = $self->maybe_regex($regex);
+ die "expecting regex, found '$regex'\n"
+ unless $usable_regex;
+ $self->ok($this =~ m/$usable_regex/, $name);
+ }
+
+=cut
+
+sub maybe_regex {
+ my( $self, $regex ) = @_;
+ my $usable_regex = undef;
+
+ return $usable_regex unless defined $regex;
+
+ my( $re, $opts );
+
+ # Check for qr/foo/
+ if( _is_qr($regex) ) {
+ $usable_regex = $regex;
+ }
+ # Check for '/foo/' or 'm,foo,'
+ elsif(( $re, $opts ) = $regex =~ m{^ /(.*)/ (\w*) $ }sx or
+ ( undef, $re, $opts ) = $regex =~ m,^ m([^\w\s]) (.+) \1 (\w*) $,sx
+ )
+ {
+ $usable_regex = length $opts ? "(?$opts)$re" : $re;
+ }
+
+ return $usable_regex;
+}
+
+sub _is_qr {
+ my $regex = shift;
+
+ # is_regexp() checks for regexes in a robust manner, say if they're
+ # blessed.
+ return re::is_regexp($regex) if defined &re::is_regexp;
+ return ref $regex eq 'Regexp';
+}
+
+sub _regex_ok {
+ my( $self, $this, $regex, $cmp, $name ) = @_;
+
+ my $ok = 0;
+ my $usable_regex = $self->maybe_regex($regex);
+ unless( defined $usable_regex ) {
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ $ok = $self->ok( 0, $name );
+ $self->diag(" '$regex' doesn't look much like a regex to me.");
+ return $ok;
+ }
+
+ {
+ ## no critic (BuiltinFunctions::ProhibitStringyEval)
+
+ my $test;
+ my $context = $self->_caller_context;
+
+ local( $@, $!, $SIG{__DIE__} ); # isolate eval
+
+ $test = eval $context . q{$test = $this =~ /$usable_regex/ ? 1 : 0};
+
+ $test = !$test if $cmp eq '!~';
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ $ok = $self->ok( $test, $name );
+ }
+
+ unless($ok) {
+ $this = defined $this ? "'$this'" : 'undef';
+ my $match = $cmp eq '=~' ? "doesn't match" : "matches";
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ $self->diag( sprintf <<'DIAGNOSTIC', $this, $match, $regex );
+ %s
+ %13s '%s'
+DIAGNOSTIC
+
+ }
+
+ return $ok;
+}
+
+# I'm not ready to publish this. It doesn't deal with array return
+# values from the code or context.
+
+=begin private
+
+=item B<_try>
+
+ my $return_from_code = $Test->try(sub { code });
+ my($return_from_code, $error) = $Test->try(sub { code });
+
+Works like eval BLOCK except it ensures it has no effect on the rest
+of the test (ie. C<$@> is not set) nor is effected by outside
+interference (ie. C<$SIG{__DIE__}>) and works around some quirks in older
+Perls.
+
+C<$error> is what would normally be in C<$@>.
+
+It is suggested you use this in place of eval BLOCK.
+
+=cut
+
+sub _try {
+ my( $self, $code, %opts ) = @_;
+
+ my $error;
+ my $return;
+ {
+ local $!; # eval can mess up $!
+ local $@; # don't set $@ in the test
+ local $SIG{__DIE__}; # don't trip an outside DIE handler.
+ $return = eval { $code->() };
+ $error = $@;
+ }
+
+ die $error if $error and $opts{die_on_fail};
+
+ return wantarray ? ( $return, $error ) : $return;
+}
+
+=end private
+
+
+=item B<is_fh>
+
+ my $is_fh = $Test->is_fh($thing);
+
+Determines if the given C<$thing> can be used as a filehandle.
+
+=cut
+
+sub is_fh {
+ my $self = shift;
+ my $maybe_fh = shift;
+ return 0 unless defined $maybe_fh;
+
+ return 1 if ref $maybe_fh eq 'GLOB'; # its a glob ref
+ return 1 if ref \$maybe_fh eq 'GLOB'; # its a glob
+
+ return eval { $maybe_fh->isa("IO::Handle") } ||
+ eval { tied($maybe_fh)->can('TIEHANDLE') };
+}
+
+=back
+
+
+=head2 Test style
+
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<level>
+
+ $Test->level($how_high);
+
+How far up the call stack should C<$Test> look when reporting where the
+test failed.
+
+Defaults to 1.
+
+Setting L<$Test::Builder::Level> overrides. This is typically useful
+localized:
+
+ sub my_ok {
+ my $test = shift;
+
+ local $Test::Builder::Level = $Test::Builder::Level + 1;
+ $TB->ok($test);
+ }
+
+To be polite to other functions wrapping your own you usually want to increment C<$Level> rather than set it to a constant.
+
+=cut
+
+sub level {
+ my( $self, $level ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $level ) {
+ $Level = $level;
+ }
+ return $Level;
+}
+
+=item B<use_numbers>
+
+ $Test->use_numbers($on_or_off);
+
+Whether or not the test should output numbers. That is, this if true:
+
+ ok 1
+ ok 2
+ ok 3
+
+or this if false
+
+ ok
+ ok
+ ok
+
+Most useful when you can't depend on the test output order, such as
+when threads or forking is involved.
+
+Defaults to on.
+
+=cut
+
+sub use_numbers {
+ my( $self, $use_nums ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $use_nums ) {
+ $self->{Use_Nums} = $use_nums;
+ }
+ return $self->{Use_Nums};
+}
+
+=item B<no_diag>
+
+ $Test->no_diag($no_diag);
+
+If set true no diagnostics will be printed. This includes calls to
+C<diag()>.
+
+=item B<no_ending>
+
+ $Test->no_ending($no_ending);
+
+Normally, Test::Builder does some extra diagnostics when the test
+ends. It also changes the exit code as described below.
+
+If this is true, none of that will be done.
+
+=item B<no_header>
+
+ $Test->no_header($no_header);
+
+If set to true, no "1..N" header will be printed.
+
+=cut
+
+foreach my $attribute (qw(No_Header No_Ending No_Diag)) {
+ my $method = lc $attribute;
+
+ my $code = sub {
+ my( $self, $no ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $no ) {
+ $self->{$attribute} = $no;
+ }
+ return $self->{$attribute};
+ };
+
+ no strict 'refs'; ## no critic
+ *{ __PACKAGE__ . '::' . $method } = $code;
+}
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Output
+
+Controlling where the test output goes.
+
+It's ok for your test to change where STDOUT and STDERR point to,
+Test::Builder's default output settings will not be affected.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<diag>
+
+ $Test->diag(@msgs);
+
+Prints out the given C<@msgs>. Like C<print>, arguments are simply
+appended together.
+
+Normally, it uses the C<failure_output()> handle, but if this is for a
+TODO test, the C<todo_output()> handle is used.
+
+Output will be indented and marked with a # so as not to interfere
+with test output. A newline will be put on the end if there isn't one
+already.
+
+We encourage using this rather than calling print directly.
+
+Returns false. Why? Because C<diag()> is often used in conjunction with
+a failing test (C<ok() || diag()>) it "passes through" the failure.
+
+ return ok(...) || diag(...);
+
+=for blame transfer
+Mark Fowler <mark@twoshortplanks.com>
+
+=cut
+
+sub diag {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ $self->_print_comment( $self->_diag_fh, @_ );
+}
+
+=item B<note>
+
+ $Test->note(@msgs);
+
+Like C<diag()>, but it prints to the C<output()> handle so it will not
+normally be seen by the user except in verbose mode.
+
+=cut
+
+sub note {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ $self->_print_comment( $self->output, @_ );
+}
+
+sub _diag_fh {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return $self->in_todo ? $self->todo_output : $self->failure_output;
+}
+
+sub _print_comment {
+ my( $self, $fh, @msgs ) = @_;
+
+ return if $self->no_diag;
+ return unless @msgs;
+
+ # Prevent printing headers when compiling (i.e. -c)
+ return if $^C;
+
+ # Smash args together like print does.
+ # Convert undef to 'undef' so its readable.
+ my $msg = join '', map { defined($_) ? $_ : 'undef' } @msgs;
+
+ # Escape the beginning, _print will take care of the rest.
+ $msg =~ s/^/# /;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ $self->_print_to_fh( $fh, $msg );
+
+ return 0;
+}
+
+=item B<explain>
+
+ my @dump = $Test->explain(@msgs);
+
+Will dump the contents of any references in a human readable format.
+Handy for things like...
+
+ is_deeply($have, $want) || diag explain $have;
+
+or
+
+ is_deeply($have, $want) || note explain $have;
+
+=cut
+
+sub explain {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ return map {
+ ref $_
+ ? do {
+ $self->_try(sub { require Data::Dumper }, die_on_fail => 1);
+
+ my $dumper = Data::Dumper->new( [$_] );
+ $dumper->Indent(1)->Terse(1);
+ $dumper->Sortkeys(1) if $dumper->can("Sortkeys");
+ $dumper->Dump;
+ }
+ : $_
+ } @_;
+}
+
+=begin _private
+
+=item B<_print>
+
+ $Test->_print(@msgs);
+
+Prints to the C<output()> filehandle.
+
+=end _private
+
+=cut
+
+sub _print {
+ my $self = shift;
+ return $self->_print_to_fh( $self->output, @_ );
+}
+
+sub _print_to_fh {
+ my( $self, $fh, @msgs ) = @_;
+
+ # Prevent printing headers when only compiling. Mostly for when
+ # tests are deparsed with B::Deparse
+ return if $^C;
+
+ my $msg = join '', @msgs;
+
+ local( $\, $", $, ) = ( undef, ' ', '' );
+
+ # Escape each line after the first with a # so we don't
+ # confuse Test::Harness.
+ $msg =~ s{\n(?!\z)}{\n# }sg;
+
+ # Stick a newline on the end if it needs it.
+ $msg .= "\n" unless $msg =~ /\n\z/;
+
+ return print $fh $self->_indent, $msg;
+}
+
+=item B<output>
+
+=item B<failure_output>
+
+=item B<todo_output>
+
+ my $filehandle = $Test->output;
+ $Test->output($filehandle);
+ $Test->output($filename);
+ $Test->output(\$scalar);
+
+These methods control where Test::Builder will print its output.
+They take either an open C<$filehandle>, a C<$filename> to open and write to
+or a C<$scalar> reference to append to. It will always return a C<$filehandle>.
+
+B<output> is where normal "ok/not ok" test output goes.
+
+Defaults to STDOUT.
+
+B<failure_output> is where diagnostic output on test failures and
+C<diag()> goes. It is normally not read by Test::Harness and instead is
+displayed to the user.
+
+Defaults to STDERR.
+
+C<todo_output> is used instead of C<failure_output()> for the
+diagnostics of a failing TODO test. These will not be seen by the
+user.
+
+Defaults to STDOUT.
+
+=cut
+
+sub output {
+ my( $self, $fh ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $fh ) {
+ $self->{Out_FH} = $self->_new_fh($fh);
+ }
+ return $self->{Out_FH};
+}
+
+sub failure_output {
+ my( $self, $fh ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $fh ) {
+ $self->{Fail_FH} = $self->_new_fh($fh);
+ }
+ return $self->{Fail_FH};
+}
+
+sub todo_output {
+ my( $self, $fh ) = @_;
+
+ if( defined $fh ) {
+ $self->{Todo_FH} = $self->_new_fh($fh);
+ }
+ return $self->{Todo_FH};
+}
+
+sub _new_fh {
+ my $self = shift;
+ my($file_or_fh) = shift;
+
+ my $fh;
+ if( $self->is_fh($file_or_fh) ) {
+ $fh = $file_or_fh;
+ }
+ elsif( ref $file_or_fh eq 'SCALAR' ) {
+ # Scalar refs as filehandles was added in 5.8.
+ if( $] >= 5.008 ) {
+ open $fh, ">>", $file_or_fh
+ or $self->croak("Can't open scalar ref $file_or_fh: $!");
+ }
+ # Emulate scalar ref filehandles with a tie.
+ else {
+ $fh = Test::Builder::IO::Scalar->new($file_or_fh)
+ or $self->croak("Can't tie scalar ref $file_or_fh");
+ }
+ }
+ else {
+ open $fh, ">", $file_or_fh
+ or $self->croak("Can't open test output log $file_or_fh: $!");
+ _autoflush($fh);
+ }
+
+ return $fh;
+}
+
+sub _autoflush {
+ my($fh) = shift;
+ my $old_fh = select $fh;
+ $| = 1;
+ select $old_fh;
+
+ return;
+}
+
+my( $Testout, $Testerr );
+
+sub _dup_stdhandles {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ $self->_open_testhandles;
+
+ # Set everything to unbuffered else plain prints to STDOUT will
+ # come out in the wrong order from our own prints.
+ _autoflush($Testout);
+ _autoflush( \*STDOUT );
+ _autoflush($Testerr);
+ _autoflush( \*STDERR );
+
+ $self->reset_outputs;
+
+ return;
+}
+
+sub _open_testhandles {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ return if $self->{Opened_Testhandles};
+
+ # We dup STDOUT and STDERR so people can change them in their
+ # test suites while still getting normal test output.
+ open( $Testout, ">&STDOUT" ) or die "Can't dup STDOUT: $!";
+ open( $Testerr, ">&STDERR" ) or die "Can't dup STDERR: $!";
+
+ # $self->_copy_io_layers( \*STDOUT, $Testout );
+ # $self->_copy_io_layers( \*STDERR, $Testerr );
+
+ $self->{Opened_Testhandles} = 1;
+
+ return;
+}
+
+sub _copy_io_layers {
+ my( $self, $src, $dst ) = @_;
+
+ $self->_try(
+ sub {
+ require PerlIO;
+ my @src_layers = PerlIO::get_layers($src);
+
+ binmode $dst, join " ", map ":$_", @src_layers if @src_layers;
+ }
+ );
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item reset_outputs
+
+ $tb->reset_outputs;
+
+Resets all the output filehandles back to their defaults.
+
+=cut
+
+sub reset_outputs {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ $self->output ($Testout);
+ $self->failure_output($Testerr);
+ $self->todo_output ($Testout);
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item carp
+
+ $tb->carp(@message);
+
+Warns with C<@message> but the message will appear to come from the
+point where the original test function was called (C<< $tb->caller >>).
+
+=item croak
+
+ $tb->croak(@message);
+
+Dies with C<@message> but the message will appear to come from the
+point where the original test function was called (C<< $tb->caller >>).
+
+=cut
+
+sub _message_at_caller {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ my( $pack, $file, $line ) = $self->caller;
+ return join( "", @_ ) . " at $file line $line.\n";
+}
+
+sub carp {
+ my $self = shift;
+ return warn $self->_message_at_caller(@_);
+}
+
+sub croak {
+ my $self = shift;
+ return die $self->_message_at_caller(@_);
+}
+
+
+=back
+
+
+=head2 Test Status and Info
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<current_test>
+
+ my $curr_test = $Test->current_test;
+ $Test->current_test($num);
+
+Gets/sets the current test number we're on. You usually shouldn't
+have to set this.
+
+If set forward, the details of the missing tests are filled in as 'unknown'.
+if set backward, the details of the intervening tests are deleted. You
+can erase history if you really want to.
+
+=cut
+
+sub current_test {
+ my( $self, $num ) = @_;
+
+ lock( $self->{Curr_Test} );
+ if( defined $num ) {
+ $self->{Curr_Test} = $num;
+
+ # If the test counter is being pushed forward fill in the details.
+ my $test_results = $self->{Test_Results};
+ if( $num > @$test_results ) {
+ my $start = @$test_results ? @$test_results : 0;
+ for( $start .. $num - 1 ) {
+ $test_results->[$_] = &share(
+ {
+ 'ok' => 1,
+ actual_ok => undef,
+ reason => 'incrementing test number',
+ type => 'unknown',
+ name => undef
+ }
+ );
+ }
+ }
+ # If backward, wipe history. Its their funeral.
+ elsif( $num < @$test_results ) {
+ $#{$test_results} = $num - 1;
+ }
+ }
+ return $self->{Curr_Test};
+}
+
+=item B<is_passing>
+
+ my $ok = $builder->is_passing;
+
+Indicates if the test suite is currently passing.
+
+More formally, it will be false if anything has happened which makes
+it impossible for the test suite to pass. True otherwise.
+
+For example, if no tests have run C<is_passing()> will be true because
+even though a suite with no tests is a failure you can add a passing
+test to it and start passing.
+
+Don't think about it too much.
+
+=cut
+
+sub is_passing {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ if( @_ ) {
+ $self->{Is_Passing} = shift;
+ }
+
+ return $self->{Is_Passing};
+}
+
+
+=item B<summary>
+
+ my @tests = $Test->summary;
+
+A simple summary of the tests so far. True for pass, false for fail.
+This is a logical pass/fail, so todos are passes.
+
+Of course, test #1 is $tests[0], etc...
+
+=cut
+
+sub summary {
+ my($self) = shift;
+
+ return map { $_->{'ok'} } @{ $self->{Test_Results} };
+}
+
+=item B<details>
+
+ my @tests = $Test->details;
+
+Like C<summary()>, but with a lot more detail.
+
+ $tests[$test_num - 1] =
+ { 'ok' => is the test considered a pass?
+ actual_ok => did it literally say 'ok'?
+ name => name of the test (if any)
+ type => type of test (if any, see below).
+ reason => reason for the above (if any)
+ };
+
+'ok' is true if Test::Harness will consider the test to be a pass.
+
+'actual_ok' is a reflection of whether or not the test literally
+printed 'ok' or 'not ok'. This is for examining the result of 'todo'
+tests.
+
+'name' is the name of the test.
+
+'type' indicates if it was a special test. Normal tests have a type
+of ''. Type can be one of the following:
+
+ skip see skip()
+ todo see todo()
+ todo_skip see todo_skip()
+ unknown see below
+
+Sometimes the Test::Builder test counter is incremented without it
+printing any test output, for example, when C<current_test()> is changed.
+In these cases, Test::Builder doesn't know the result of the test, so
+its type is 'unknown'. These details for these tests are filled in.
+They are considered ok, but the name and actual_ok is left C<undef>.
+
+For example "not ok 23 - hole count # TODO insufficient donuts" would
+result in this structure:
+
+ $tests[22] = # 23 - 1, since arrays start from 0.
+ { ok => 1, # logically, the test passed since its todo
+ actual_ok => 0, # in absolute terms, it failed
+ name => 'hole count',
+ type => 'todo',
+ reason => 'insufficient donuts'
+ };
+
+=cut
+
+sub details {
+ my $self = shift;
+ return @{ $self->{Test_Results} };
+}
+
+=item B<todo>
+
+ my $todo_reason = $Test->todo;
+ my $todo_reason = $Test->todo($pack);
+
+If the current tests are considered "TODO" it will return the reason,
+if any. This reason can come from a C<$TODO> variable or the last call
+to C<todo_start()>.
+
+Since a TODO test does not need a reason, this function can return an
+empty string even when inside a TODO block. Use C<< $Test->in_todo >>
+to determine if you are currently inside a TODO block.
+
+C<todo()> is about finding the right package to look for C<$TODO> in. It's
+pretty good at guessing the right package to look at. It first looks for
+the caller based on C<$Level + 1>, since C<todo()> is usually called inside
+a test function. As a last resort it will use C<exported_to()>.
+
+Sometimes there is some confusion about where todo() should be looking
+for the C<$TODO> variable. If you want to be sure, tell it explicitly
+what $pack to use.
+
+=cut
+
+sub todo {
+ my( $self, $pack ) = @_;
+
+ return $self->{Todo} if defined $self->{Todo};
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ my $todo = $self->find_TODO($pack);
+ return $todo if defined $todo;
+
+ return '';
+}
+
+=item B<find_TODO>
+
+ my $todo_reason = $Test->find_TODO();
+ my $todo_reason = $Test->find_TODO($pack):
+
+Like C<todo()> but only returns the value of C<$TODO> ignoring
+C<todo_start()>.
+
+=cut
+
+sub find_TODO {
+ my( $self, $pack ) = @_;
+
+ $pack = $pack || $self->caller(1) || $self->exported_to;
+ return unless $pack;
+
+ no strict 'refs'; ## no critic
+ return ${ $pack . '::TODO' };
+}
+
+=item B<in_todo>
+
+ my $in_todo = $Test->in_todo;
+
+Returns true if the test is currently inside a TODO block.
+
+=cut
+
+sub in_todo {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ return( defined $self->{Todo} || $self->find_TODO ) ? 1 : 0;
+}
+
+=item B<todo_start>
+
+ $Test->todo_start();
+ $Test->todo_start($message);
+
+This method allows you declare all subsequent tests as TODO tests, up until
+the C<todo_end> method has been called.
+
+The C<TODO:> and C<$TODO> syntax is generally pretty good about figuring out
+whether or not we're in a TODO test. However, often we find that this is not
+possible to determine (such as when we want to use C<$TODO> but
+the tests are being executed in other packages which can't be inferred
+beforehand).
+
+Note that you can use this to nest "todo" tests
+
+ $Test->todo_start('working on this');
+ # lots of code
+ $Test->todo_start('working on that');
+ # more code
+ $Test->todo_end;
+ $Test->todo_end;
+
+This is generally not recommended, but large testing systems often have weird
+internal needs.
+
+We've tried to make this also work with the TODO: syntax, but it's not
+guaranteed and its use is also discouraged:
+
+ TODO: {
+ local $TODO = 'We have work to do!';
+ $Test->todo_start('working on this');
+ # lots of code
+ $Test->todo_start('working on that');
+ # more code
+ $Test->todo_end;
+ $Test->todo_end;
+ }
+
+Pick one style or another of "TODO" to be on the safe side.
+
+=cut
+
+sub todo_start {
+ my $self = shift;
+ my $message = @_ ? shift : '';
+
+ $self->{Start_Todo}++;
+ if( $self->in_todo ) {
+ push @{ $self->{Todo_Stack} } => $self->todo;
+ }
+ $self->{Todo} = $message;
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item C<todo_end>
+
+ $Test->todo_end;
+
+Stops running tests as "TODO" tests. This method is fatal if called without a
+preceding C<todo_start> method call.
+
+=cut
+
+sub todo_end {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ if( !$self->{Start_Todo} ) {
+ $self->croak('todo_end() called without todo_start()');
+ }
+
+ $self->{Start_Todo}--;
+
+ if( $self->{Start_Todo} && @{ $self->{Todo_Stack} } ) {
+ $self->{Todo} = pop @{ $self->{Todo_Stack} };
+ }
+ else {
+ delete $self->{Todo};
+ }
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item B<caller>
+
+ my $package = $Test->caller;
+ my($pack, $file, $line) = $Test->caller;
+ my($pack, $file, $line) = $Test->caller($height);
+
+Like the normal C<caller()>, except it reports according to your C<level()>.
+
+C<$height> will be added to the C<level()>.
+
+If C<caller()> winds up off the top of the stack it report the highest context.
+
+=cut
+
+sub caller { ## no critic (Subroutines::ProhibitBuiltinHomonyms)
+ my( $self, $height ) = @_;
+ $height ||= 0;
+
+ my $level = $self->level + $height + 1;
+ my @caller;
+ do {
+ @caller = CORE::caller( $level );
+ $level--;
+ } until @caller;
+ return wantarray ? @caller : $caller[0];
+}
+
+=back
+
+=cut
+
+=begin _private
+
+=over 4
+
+=item B<_sanity_check>
+
+ $self->_sanity_check();
+
+Runs a bunch of end of test sanity checks to make sure reality came
+through ok. If anything is wrong it will die with a fairly friendly
+error message.
+
+=cut
+
+#'#
+sub _sanity_check {
+ my $self = shift;
+
+ $self->_whoa( $self->{Curr_Test} < 0, 'Says here you ran a negative number of tests!' );
+ $self->_whoa( $self->{Curr_Test} != @{ $self->{Test_Results} },
+ 'Somehow you got a different number of results than tests ran!' );
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item B<_whoa>
+
+ $self->_whoa($check, $description);
+
+A sanity check, similar to C<assert()>. If the C<$check> is true, something
+has gone horribly wrong. It will die with the given C<$description> and
+a note to contact the author.
+
+=cut
+
+sub _whoa {
+ my( $self, $check, $desc ) = @_;
+ if($check) {
+ local $Level = $Level + 1;
+ $self->croak(<<"WHOA");
+WHOA! $desc
+This should never happen! Please contact the author immediately!
+WHOA
+ }
+
+ return;
+}
+
+=item B<_my_exit>
+
+ _my_exit($exit_num);
+
+Perl seems to have some trouble with exiting inside an C<END> block.
+5.6.1 does some odd things. Instead, this function edits C<$?>
+directly. It should B<only> be called from inside an C<END> block.
+It doesn't actually exit, that's your job.
+
+=cut
+
+sub _my_exit {
+ $? = $_[0]; ## no critic (Variables::RequireLocalizedPunctuationVars)
+
+ return 1;
+}
+
+=back
+
+=end _private
+
+=cut
+
+sub _ending {
+ my $self = shift;
+ return if $self->no_ending;
+ return if $self->{Ending}++;
+
+ my $real_exit_code = $?;
+
+ # Don't bother with an ending if this is a forked copy. Only the parent
+ # should do the ending.
+ if( $self->{Original_Pid} != $$ ) {
+ return;
+ }
+
+ # Ran tests but never declared a plan or hit done_testing
+ if( !$self->{Have_Plan} and $self->{Curr_Test} ) {
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ $self->diag("Tests were run but no plan was declared and done_testing() was not seen.");
+ }
+
+ # Exit if plan() was never called. This is so "require Test::Simple"
+ # doesn't puke.
+ if( !$self->{Have_Plan} ) {
+ return;
+ }
+
+ # Don't do an ending if we bailed out.
+ if( $self->{Bailed_Out} ) {
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ return;
+ }
+ # Figure out if we passed or failed and print helpful messages.
+ my $test_results = $self->{Test_Results};
+ if(@$test_results) {
+ # The plan? We have no plan.
+ if( $self->{No_Plan} ) {
+ $self->_output_plan($self->{Curr_Test}) unless $self->no_header;
+ $self->{Expected_Tests} = $self->{Curr_Test};
+ }
+
+ # Auto-extended arrays and elements which aren't explicitly
+ # filled in with a shared reference will puke under 5.8.0
+ # ithreads. So we have to fill them in by hand. :(
+ my $empty_result = &share( {} );
+ for my $idx ( 0 .. $self->{Expected_Tests} - 1 ) {
+ $test_results->[$idx] = $empty_result
+ unless defined $test_results->[$idx];
+ }
+
+ my $num_failed = grep !$_->{'ok'}, @{$test_results}[ 0 .. $self->{Curr_Test} - 1 ];
+
+ my $num_extra = $self->{Curr_Test} - $self->{Expected_Tests};
+
+ if( $num_extra != 0 ) {
+ my $s = $self->{Expected_Tests} == 1 ? '' : 's';
+ $self->diag(<<"FAIL");
+Looks like you planned $self->{Expected_Tests} test$s but ran $self->{Curr_Test}.
+FAIL
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ }
+
+ if($num_failed) {
+ my $num_tests = $self->{Curr_Test};
+ my $s = $num_failed == 1 ? '' : 's';
+
+ my $qualifier = $num_extra == 0 ? '' : ' run';
+
+ $self->diag(<<"FAIL");
+Looks like you failed $num_failed test$s of $num_tests$qualifier.
+FAIL
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ }
+
+ if($real_exit_code) {
+ $self->diag(<<"FAIL");
+Looks like your test exited with $real_exit_code just after $self->{Curr_Test}.
+FAIL
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ _my_exit($real_exit_code) && return;
+ }
+
+ my $exit_code;
+ if($num_failed) {
+ $exit_code = $num_failed <= 254 ? $num_failed : 254;
+ }
+ elsif( $num_extra != 0 ) {
+ $exit_code = 255;
+ }
+ else {
+ $exit_code = 0;
+ }
+
+ _my_exit($exit_code) && return;
+ }
+ elsif( $self->{Skip_All} ) {
+ _my_exit(0) && return;
+ }
+ elsif($real_exit_code) {
+ $self->diag(<<"FAIL");
+Looks like your test exited with $real_exit_code before it could output anything.
+FAIL
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ _my_exit($real_exit_code) && return;
+ }
+ else {
+ $self->diag("No tests run!\n");
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ _my_exit(255) && return;
+ }
+
+ $self->is_passing(0);
+ $self->_whoa( 1, "We fell off the end of _ending()" );
+}
+
+END {
+ $Test->_ending if defined $Test;
+}
+
+=head1 EXIT CODES
+
+If all your tests passed, Test::Builder will exit with zero (which is
+normal). If anything failed it will exit with how many failed. If
+you run less (or more) tests than you planned, the missing (or extras)
+will be considered failures. If no tests were ever run Test::Builder
+will throw a warning and exit with 255. If the test died, even after
+having successfully completed all its tests, it will still be
+considered a failure and will exit with 255.
+
+So the exit codes are...
+
+ 0 all tests successful
+ 255 test died or all passed but wrong # of tests run
+ any other number how many failed (including missing or extras)
+
+If you fail more than 254 tests, it will be reported as 254.
+
+=head1 THREADS
+
+In perl 5.8.1 and later, Test::Builder is thread-safe. The test
+number is shared amongst all threads. This means if one thread sets
+the test number using C<current_test()> they will all be effected.
+
+While versions earlier than 5.8.1 had threads they contain too many
+bugs to support.
+
+Test::Builder is only thread-aware if threads.pm is loaded I<before>
+Test::Builder.
+
+=head1 MEMORY
+
+An informative hash, accessable via C<<details()>>, is stored for each
+test you perform. So memory usage will scale linearly with each test
+run. Although this is not a problem for most test suites, it can
+become an issue if you do large (hundred thousands to million)
+combinatorics tests in the same run.
+
+In such cases, you are advised to either split the test file into smaller
+ones, or use a reverse approach, doing "normal" (code) compares and
+triggering fail() should anything go unexpected.
+
+Future versions of Test::Builder will have a way to turn history off.
+
+
+=head1 EXAMPLES
+
+CPAN can provide the best examples. Test::Simple, Test::More,
+Test::Exception and Test::Differences all use Test::Builder.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+Test::Simple, Test::More, Test::Harness
+
+=head1 AUTHORS
+
+Original code by chromatic, maintained by Michael G Schwern
+E<lt>schwern@pobox.comE<gt>
+
+=head1 COPYRIGHT
+
+Copyright 2002-2008 by chromatic E<lt>chromatic@wgz.orgE<gt> and
+ Michael G Schwern E<lt>schwern@pobox.comE<gt>.
+
+This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
+modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+See F<http://www.perl.com/perl/misc/Artistic.html>
+
+=cut
+
+1;
+
View
658 inc/Test/Builder/IO/Scalar.pm
@@ -0,0 +1,658 @@
+package Test::Builder::IO::Scalar;
+
+
+=head1 NAME
+
+Test::Builder::IO::Scalar - A copy of IO::Scalar for Test::Builder
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This is a copy of IO::Scalar which ships with Test::Builder to
+support scalar references as filehandles on Perl 5.6. Newer
+versions of Perl simply use C<<open()>>'s built in support.
+
+Test::Builder can not have dependencies on other modules without
+careful consideration, so its simply been copied into the distribution.
+
+=head1 COPYRIGHT and LICENSE
+
+This file came from the "IO-stringy" Perl5 toolkit.
+
+Copyright (c) 1996 by Eryq. All rights reserved.
+Copyright (c) 1999,2001 by ZeeGee Software Inc. All rights reserved.
+
+This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
+modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.
+
+
+=cut
+
+# This is copied code, I don't care.
+##no critic
+
+use Carp;
+use strict;
+use vars qw($VERSION @ISA);
+use IO::Handle;
+