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README.md

BitScoop App Platform Demo

You can build with any API on the BitScoop platform which makes being a software developer more interesting than ever. In this demo, we demonstrate how to use Amazon Lambda to fetch daily statistics about your tech stack, store that data in an RDS box, and then serve this data through AWS API Gateway as a microservice.

Create/configure accounts with Postman, Google, and StatusCake

You need to create a BitScoop account via (https://bitscoop.com/signup) as well as an AWS account. You will need to create a Postman Pro account, a Google account, and/or a StatusCake account to use those services in this demo. For the sake of brevity we will not cover the specifics here, but you can find step-by-step instructions in our blog post about this demo at <INSERT_LINK_HERE>.

Add API Maps to BitScoop

To quickly get started with what you'll need on BitScoop, you can add the following API Maps using the buttons below. Note that you do not need to use all of these services for the demo to run, as the Amazon Lambda function that powers the Alexa Skill will adjust automatically based on how you configure it. So you only need to add the ones to BitScoop that you want to try for yourself. Make sure to substitute the values for the API keys, client IDs, and client secrets where appropriate.

API Map File Name
Postman Pro API Monitors postman.json Add to BitScoop
Google Analytics Data google_analytics.json Add to BitScoop
StatusCake Health Alerts statuscake.json Add to BitScoop
GitHub Issues github.json Add to BitScoop

Authorize Google Analytics (only if using that service)

Make a POST request to the Connection URL shown on the Details page for the Google Analytics map; it will be in the form https://api.bitscoop.com/<map_id>/connections. The response body will contain two fields, 'redirectUrl' and 'id'. Save 'id', which is the ID of the new connection, for later, and go to the redirectUrl in a browser. Google should request authorization for the Analytics API for one of your Google accounts. If successful, you should be able to make calls via that map with the header 'X-Connection-Id: <connection_id>'.

Build this project (optional)

If you want to build this project yourself, you will need to have node.js and npm installed on your machine so that you can install the demo’s dependencies before uploading the code to Lambda. From the top level of this directory, run

npm install

to install all of the dependencies, then run the command

grunt build

to zip the project to dist/bitscoop-alexa-demo-.zip

Setting up an RDS box, configuring AWS networking, and deploying this code to Lambda

You first need set up some network configurations. We’re going to create everything from scratch so that you don’t interfere with anything you may already have in AWS.

Go to IAM roles and create a new role. Click Select next to AWS Lambda. You will need to add three policies to this role:

  • AWSLambdaBasicExecution
  • AWSLambdaCloudFormation
  • AWSLambdaVPCAccessExecution Click Next Step, give the role a name, and then click Create Role. This role will be used by the Lambda function to specify what it has permission to access.

Go to your VPCs and create a new one. Tag it with something like ‘bitscoop-demo’ so you can easily identify it later. For the IPv4 CIDR block, enter 10.0.0.0/16, or something similar if that is already taken. Leave IPv6 CIDR block and tenancy as their defaults and create the VPC.

View your Subnets. You should create four new subnets. Two of these will be public subnets, and two will be private. Call the public ones ‘public1’ and ‘public2’, and the private ones ‘private1’ and ‘private2’. Make sure they are all on the ‘bitscoop-demo’ VPC we created. One public and one private subnet should be in the same availability zone, and the other public and private subnets should be in different AZs, e.g. public1 in us-east-1a, public2 in us-east-1c, private1 in us-east-1a, and private2 in us-east-1b. Remember which AZ is shared between a public and private subnet for later. The CIDR block needs to be different for each subnet and they all need to fall within the CIDR block of the VPC; if the VPC block is 10.0.0.0/16, you could use 10.0.0.0/24, 10.0.1.0/24, 10.0.2.0/24, and 10.0.3.0/24. AWS will let you know if anything overlaps.

Go view your NAT Gateways. Create a new Gateway, and for the subnet pick the public subnet that shares an AZ with a private subnet, e.g. 'public1'' in the example above. Click Create New EIP and then Create the gateway. This new gateway should have an ID nat-. It should be noted that, while almost everything in this demo is part of AWS’ free tier, NAT gateways are NOT free. They’re pretty cheap, at about $0.05 per hour and $0.05 per GB of data processed, but don’t forget to delete this when you’re done with the demo (and don’t forget to create a new one and point the private route table to the new one if you revisit this demo).

Go to Route Tables and create two new ones. Name one ‘public’ and the other ‘private’, and make sure they’re in the ‘bitscoop-demo’ VPC. When they’re created, click on the ‘private’ one and select the Routes tab at the bottom of the page. Click Edit, and add another route with a destination of 0.0.0.0/0 and a target of the NAT gateway we just created (so nat-, not igw-). Make sure to save the private route table.

Go back to the subnets and click on one of the ‘private’ ones. Click on the Route Table tab, click Edit, and change it in the dropdown to the ‘private’ Route Table that you created in the previous step. Then click Save. Repeat this for the other ‘private’ subnet.

You also need to create a couple of Security Groups. Name the first one ‘rds’ and make sure it’s in the ‘bitscoop-demo’ VPC, then create it. Click on it in the list, click on the Inbound Rules tab, and then click Edit. You’ll want to add a MySQL/Aurora rule (port 3306) for 10.0.0.0/16 (or whatever CIDR block you picked for the VPC) so Lambda can access the RDS box internally. Additionally, look up the CIDR block for QuickSight for your region and add an additional MySQL/Aurora rule for that. If you want to make sure that the box you’re going to set up is working as intended, you can also add a MySQL/Aurora rule for your IP address. You do not need to add any Outbound Rules.

You also need to add a Security Group called ‘lambda’. This does not need any Inbound Rules, but it does need Outbound Rules for HTTP (80) to 0.0.0.0/0 and HTTPS (443) to 0.0.0.0/0.

Finally, you will set up the RDS box to store the data that will be generated. Click on Instances and select Launch DB Instance. For this demo we are using MySQL; if you wish to use a different database, you may have to install a different library in the demo project and change the Sequelize dialect to that db.

Click on MySQL (or whatever Engine you want) and then click the Select button next to the version you wish to use (MySQL only has one version as of this publication). On the ‘Production?’ page we recommend selecting the Dev/Test instance of MySQL to minimize the cost to you; test instances can be run cost-free as part of AWS’ free tier. Click Next Step to go to ‘Specify DB Details’. On this page you can click the checkbox ‘Only show options that are eligible for RDS Free Tier’ to ensure you don’t configure a box that costs money.

Select a DB Instance class; db.t2.micro is normally free and should be sufficient for this demo, as should the default storage amount (5GB as of publication). Pick a DB Instance Identifier, as well as a username and password. Save the latter two for later reference, as you will need to set Environment Variables in the Lambda function for them so that the function can connect to the DB. Click Next Step.

On the Advanced Settings screen, select the ‘bitscoop-demo’ VPC. Under VPC Security Group(s), select the ‘rds’ group we created earlier. Make sure to give the database a name and save this name for later use, as it too will need to be added to an Environment Variable. Also make sure the box is publicly accessible, and make sure the Availability Zone is the one that’s shared between a public and private subnet (us-east-1a in the above example). Click Launch DB Instance.

Go to your RDS instances. When the box you just created is ready, click Instance Actions, then See Details. Look at the second column, Security and Network. Take note of the Endpoint field near the bottom. Save this for later use, as it will be used in another Environment Variable.

This should take care of all of the networking requirements. You will now need create a new Lambda function with the project code.

Go to Lambda Home and click ‘Create a Lambda function’. For the blueprint select ‘Blank Function’. For the trigger, click the gray dashed box and select ‘Cloudwatch Events - Schedule’. Name the trigger whatever you want. The schedule expression can be whatever you want as well; ‘cron(0 17 ? * MON-SUN *)’ will run the function once a day at 17:00 UTC. The documentation for schedule expressions can be found here.

Name the function something and set the runtime to Node.js 6.10. For Code Entry Type click the dropdown and select ‘Upload a .ZIP file’, then click on the Upload button that appears and then navigate to and select the bitscoop-data-science-demo-.zip file. The Handler should be ‘index.handler’. For the role, select the role that you created earlier.

You will need to add several Environment Variables, with the number depending on how many services you wish to run. You will always need to add the following variables:

  • BITSCOOP_API_KEY (obtainable at https://bitscoop.com/keys)
  • PORT (by default it’s 3306)
  • HOST (the endpoint for the RDS box, ...rds.amazonaws.com)
  • USER (the username you picked for the RDS box)
  • PASSWORD (the password you set for the RDS box)
  • DATABASE (the database name you set for the RDS box)

If you are getting data from GitHub, you will need to add these:

  • GITHUB_MAP_ID (The ID of the BitScoop API map you created for GitHub)
  • GITHUB_USER (the username that owns the repo you’re interested in)
  • GITHUB_REPO (the name of the repo you’re interested in)

If you are getting data from Google Analytics, you will need to add these:

  • GOOGLE_MAP_ID (The ID of the BitScoop API map you created for Google)
  • GOOGLE_GA_VIEW_ID (the ID of the View you are monitoring)
  • GOOGLE_CONNECTION_ID (the ID of the BitScoop Connection you created to the Google Analytics API Map)

If you are getting data from StatusCake, you will need to add these:

  • STATUSCAKE_MAP_ID (The ID of the BitScoop API map you created for StatusCake)
  • STATUSCAKE_TEST_ID (the ID of the Test you are monitoring)

If you are getting data from Postman, you will need to add these:

  • POSTMAN_MAP_ID (The ID of the BitScoop API map you created for Postman)
  • POSTMAN_MONITOR_ID (the ID of the Monitor you are running)

Open the Advanced Settings accordion. You’ll probably want to set the Timeout to 10 seconds. Under VPC select the ‘bitscoop-demo’ VPC. For Subnets add the two ‘private’ subnets, and for the Security Group select ‘lambda’ one we created. Hit next and you’ll be taken to a review screen, and then select ‘Create Function’ at the very bottom of the page.

If you did not set a trigger earlier, go to the details for the function and click the tab ‘Triggers’. Click ‘Add Trigger’, click on the dashed gray box, then ‘Cloudwatch Events - Schedule’. See above for the remaining steps to set up a scheduled trigger. Then click Submit.

Your Lambda function should be good to go. See after the final step for instructions on how to test the function.

Explore the data in AWS QuickSight

Congratulations! The BitScoop powered data science platform is now up and running. Let’s see what this data can tell us to help the data scientists at our imaginary company, Dog.Breed.

Connect the Data to AWS QuickSight After signing up for QuickSight, navigate to the Start page. Click New Analysis, then New Data Sets. You’ll want to create a new data set from a New Data Source, specifically RDS. Enter a name for this data source, then click on the down arrow on Instance and then click on the name of the RDS box. It should auto-populate the database name for you. Enter the username and password, then validate the connection. When that succeeds, click Create data source.

From there, select the table you want to analyze and click the Select button. By default QuickSight will have selected import to SPICE; leave it as is and click Visualize.

Testing the Lambda function

Click the ‘Actions’ dropdown next to ‘Test’ and select ‘Configure Test Event’. Select the template 'Scheduled Event'. The details of the test event are unimportant, so you can leave them as the defaults.

Click Save and Test and the function should run.

Explore the data in AWS QuickSight

Congratulations! The BitScoop powered data science platform is now up and running. Let’s see what this data can tell us to help the data scientists at our imaginary company, Dog.Breed.

Connect the Data to AWS QuickSight

After signing up for QuickSight, navigate to the Start page. Click New Analysis, then New Data Sets. You’ll want to create a new data set from a New Data Source, specifically RDS. Enter a name for this data source, then click on the down arrow on Instance and then click on the name of the RDS box. It should auto-populate the database name for you. Enter the username and password, then validate the connection. When that succeeds, click Create data source.

From there, select the table you want to analyze and click the Select button. By default QuickSight will have selected import to SPICE; leave it as is and click Visualize.

We will now create five charts to help determine the answers to the key questions we asked before. First select the “+ Add” button in the top left of Quicksight. Then select the “Visualize” bar on the right and ensure that the SPICE data set is chosen. Select the time field in blue to be mapped to the X axis of the visualization. Now you make select any column in order to visualize the different data sets together over time. The follow are the corresponding dimensions (columns vs time) used to answer each question from the data.

  • Do product code releases relate to a change in site activity such as new users?
    • Chart code pushes, code releases, visitors, and new visitors over time.
  • Do site traffic spikes relate to outages of the API?
    • Chart API test alerts and visitors over time.
  • Do new user spikes relate to outages of the site?
    • Chart new visitors and site outage alerts over time.
  • Do outages of the API relate to outages of the site?
    • Chart API outages and Site outages over time.
  • Do outages of the API or relate to higher number of code commits?
    • Chart API outages and Code commits over time

Exploring the data with other analysis products

Connecting other products to RDS, such as Tableau, DataIku, or Paxata, should be similar to connecting QuickSight. One thing you may have to differently is configure the RDS security group to accept incoming requests from whatever IP address or IP range this other service is calling from. The instructions above had you add QuickSight’s IP range to the RDS security group, but this is not what another service would be using.

Users are only beginning to explore what is possible on BitScoop Should you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out at https://bitscoop.com/support.