New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Can't edit external tile sets #242

Closed
bgulanowski opened this Issue Jul 19, 2012 · 22 comments

Comments

Projects
None yet
5 participants
@bgulanowski

bgulanowski commented Jul 19, 2012

This may be more of a workflow issue (so, documentation), than a bug. But once I export a tile set, I can't set properties on the tiles any longer. That means I have to do it manually, or I have to re-create my whole map over again! (Because I have to delete the tile set and re-create it, but if I do that, all the tiles get removed).

In any case, I am trying to develop a workflow that lets me change the tile properties without destroying the maps.

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Jul 19, 2012

Owner

This is a technical limitation since Tiled only knows how to keep track of a single document (file) per map. Basically it is currently not possible for the undo system to cope with changes made to external tilesets since they are shared between multiple maps, so the UI stops you from changing them.

It is however possible to temporarily import the tileset, make any changes to tile properties, and then export it again. The forced saving of the file on export makes sure that no changes go lost. This way of doing things isn't ideal, but is still much more comfortable than re-creating the tileset.

Owner

bjorn commented Jul 19, 2012

This is a technical limitation since Tiled only knows how to keep track of a single document (file) per map. Basically it is currently not possible for the undo system to cope with changes made to external tilesets since they are shared between multiple maps, so the UI stops you from changing them.

It is however possible to temporarily import the tileset, make any changes to tile properties, and then export it again. The forced saving of the file on export makes sure that no changes go lost. This way of doing things isn't ideal, but is still much more comfortable than re-creating the tileset.

@mtrpcic

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@mtrpcic

mtrpcic Nov 20, 2012

Has any progress been made on this since the last comment? I've just encountered it now, and while there is a workaround, it's a little bit frustrating.

mtrpcic commented Nov 20, 2012

Has any progress been made on this since the last comment? I've just encountered it now, and while there is a workaround, it's a little bit frustrating.

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Nov 21, 2012

Owner

Nope, sorry.

Owner

bjorn commented Nov 21, 2012

Nope, sorry.

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Feb 28, 2016

Contributor

Actually, making it possible to edit external tilesets without first importing them is currently my number one priority. Unfortunately, I think the problem goes beyond what is reasonably fixable with small UI adjustments in the Tilesets view. This is because when you can edit a tileset as a separate file, it will have its own undo stack as well, which means that either there would be another set of undo/redo buttons in the Tilesets view, or editing the tileset will mean switching to it entirely and adjusting the Tiled interface (like toolbars and available views) accordingly. Of course I'd like to keep the change small, but I think the first option here would be pretty bad. But the latter option is a rather huge change.

(from #1213)

I agree that adding separate undo/redo buttons for the tilesets panel would be a bad solution, it's essentially trading a UI problem for a different one.

As far as I understand, the core of the issue here is a discrepancy between the user's mental model of undoing ("it undoes the last thing I did in this tab") and Qt/Tiled's implementation ("it undoes the last thing the user did in a specific file"). This works fine when it's clear to Tiled which file the user is editing (by having a 1-1 mapping between files and tabs) but this falls apart when the same tab can have multiple files open (eg. map and tilesets).

From here I can see two options:

  • Change the user's mental model. This means revamping the UI so that tilesets can be opened in their own tabs for editing. I believe this is what you were mentioning in the line I quoted above. This isn't ideal because embedded tilesets also are editable so the tileset editing options would have to exist in both map tabs and tileset tabs. It's a bit unclear to me how this would work and look like, and it would drastically alter workflows.
  • Change Tiled's implementation of undo/redo. I'm a bit of a tourist in this codebase and I've never used Qt too seriously so I hope this suggestion isn't too unrealistic. This solution goes as follow:

Managing multiple undo stacks in one tab

Basics

  • Let external tilesets have a separate undo/redo stack (as you mentioned earlier)
  • For every undoable action applied to the map or a tileset, store two additional pieces of data in the UndoAction object: which tab the action was performed in, and a action number which is provided by the tab and ever incrementing (per tab).
  • When pressing the undo button, compare the action number of the actions at the top of the undo stacks of every file in the current tab. Undo the action with the highest action number, ignoring those that originated from a different tab.

Example

Here is a simple example (with one tab):

  • Tab "MyMap" has two files opened: MyMap.tmx and an external tileset MyTileset.tsx.
  • User paints a tile on the map. A "paint tile" undo action is added to the undo stack for MyMap.tmx, with a reference to the MyMap tab and the action number 0.
  • User edits a tile property in the tileset. A "edit tile property" undo action is added to the undo stack for MyTileset.tsx, with a reference to the MyMap tab and the action number 1.
  • User presses Ctrl+Z. The action at the top of the MyMap.tmx undo stack has action number 0, while the action at the top of the MyTileset.tsx has action number 1. One is greater than zero so the action at the top of the undo stack for MyTileset.tsx is undone.
  • User presses Ctrl+Z again. The undo stack for MyTileset.tsx is empty so we process the undo command in the stack for MyMap.tmx.

When users press the redo button, we redo in the undo stack which offers an action stored with the lowest action number.

When performing an action after a few undos, all the undo stacks for files in the tab are truncated from their current level to the top.

Dealing with concurrent edits

Since an external tileset can be edited in different tabs concurrently, we need a way to make sure things behave consistently when trying to undo changes across tabs. My suggestion here is that when an action is performed on a tileset from a tab which is different from the one that currently has actions in the tileset's undo stack, that tileset's undo stack is wiped. This is why I suggested storing which tabs actions originate from.

As a result, the only scenario where a undo stack gets wiped is the following:

  • User edits tileset T in tab M1.
  • User edits tileset T in tab M2. Tileset T's undo stack is wiped when performing the first action.

Note that changes in tab M1 to the map or other tilesets can still be undone/redone.

Notes

Overall, I think the advantages of this solution are:

  • Completely natural undo/redo mechanic
  • Preserves existing workflow
  • No drastic UI changes
  • Allows integrating future files (other than tilesets) in the undo/redo stack

The only inconvenient I see is that it is non-trivial work to implement this feature on top of Qt's undo/redo system but it doesn't sound as bad as revamping the whole UI. It is also much less risky and self-contained.

As a side note, this could also be implemented by adding custom undo stacks to tabs (with which Ctrl+Z/Ctrl+Y would interface), rather than polluting the existing actions with extra data. I feel like the idea was easier to describe with extra data in the undo actions but it's probably not the cleanest way to implement it.

It's definitely tricky to explain so let me know if part of this sounds confusing!

Contributor

agersant commented Feb 28, 2016

Actually, making it possible to edit external tilesets without first importing them is currently my number one priority. Unfortunately, I think the problem goes beyond what is reasonably fixable with small UI adjustments in the Tilesets view. This is because when you can edit a tileset as a separate file, it will have its own undo stack as well, which means that either there would be another set of undo/redo buttons in the Tilesets view, or editing the tileset will mean switching to it entirely and adjusting the Tiled interface (like toolbars and available views) accordingly. Of course I'd like to keep the change small, but I think the first option here would be pretty bad. But the latter option is a rather huge change.

(from #1213)

I agree that adding separate undo/redo buttons for the tilesets panel would be a bad solution, it's essentially trading a UI problem for a different one.

As far as I understand, the core of the issue here is a discrepancy between the user's mental model of undoing ("it undoes the last thing I did in this tab") and Qt/Tiled's implementation ("it undoes the last thing the user did in a specific file"). This works fine when it's clear to Tiled which file the user is editing (by having a 1-1 mapping between files and tabs) but this falls apart when the same tab can have multiple files open (eg. map and tilesets).

From here I can see two options:

  • Change the user's mental model. This means revamping the UI so that tilesets can be opened in their own tabs for editing. I believe this is what you were mentioning in the line I quoted above. This isn't ideal because embedded tilesets also are editable so the tileset editing options would have to exist in both map tabs and tileset tabs. It's a bit unclear to me how this would work and look like, and it would drastically alter workflows.
  • Change Tiled's implementation of undo/redo. I'm a bit of a tourist in this codebase and I've never used Qt too seriously so I hope this suggestion isn't too unrealistic. This solution goes as follow:

Managing multiple undo stacks in one tab

Basics

  • Let external tilesets have a separate undo/redo stack (as you mentioned earlier)
  • For every undoable action applied to the map or a tileset, store two additional pieces of data in the UndoAction object: which tab the action was performed in, and a action number which is provided by the tab and ever incrementing (per tab).
  • When pressing the undo button, compare the action number of the actions at the top of the undo stacks of every file in the current tab. Undo the action with the highest action number, ignoring those that originated from a different tab.

Example

Here is a simple example (with one tab):

  • Tab "MyMap" has two files opened: MyMap.tmx and an external tileset MyTileset.tsx.
  • User paints a tile on the map. A "paint tile" undo action is added to the undo stack for MyMap.tmx, with a reference to the MyMap tab and the action number 0.
  • User edits a tile property in the tileset. A "edit tile property" undo action is added to the undo stack for MyTileset.tsx, with a reference to the MyMap tab and the action number 1.
  • User presses Ctrl+Z. The action at the top of the MyMap.tmx undo stack has action number 0, while the action at the top of the MyTileset.tsx has action number 1. One is greater than zero so the action at the top of the undo stack for MyTileset.tsx is undone.
  • User presses Ctrl+Z again. The undo stack for MyTileset.tsx is empty so we process the undo command in the stack for MyMap.tmx.

When users press the redo button, we redo in the undo stack which offers an action stored with the lowest action number.

When performing an action after a few undos, all the undo stacks for files in the tab are truncated from their current level to the top.

Dealing with concurrent edits

Since an external tileset can be edited in different tabs concurrently, we need a way to make sure things behave consistently when trying to undo changes across tabs. My suggestion here is that when an action is performed on a tileset from a tab which is different from the one that currently has actions in the tileset's undo stack, that tileset's undo stack is wiped. This is why I suggested storing which tabs actions originate from.

As a result, the only scenario where a undo stack gets wiped is the following:

  • User edits tileset T in tab M1.
  • User edits tileset T in tab M2. Tileset T's undo stack is wiped when performing the first action.

Note that changes in tab M1 to the map or other tilesets can still be undone/redone.

Notes

Overall, I think the advantages of this solution are:

  • Completely natural undo/redo mechanic
  • Preserves existing workflow
  • No drastic UI changes
  • Allows integrating future files (other than tilesets) in the undo/redo stack

The only inconvenient I see is that it is non-trivial work to implement this feature on top of Qt's undo/redo system but it doesn't sound as bad as revamping the whole UI. It is also much less risky and self-contained.

As a side note, this could also be implemented by adding custom undo stacks to tabs (with which Ctrl+Z/Ctrl+Y would interface), rather than polluting the existing actions with extra data. I feel like the idea was easier to describe with extra data in the undo actions but it's probably not the cleanest way to implement it.

It's definitely tricky to explain so let me know if part of this sounds confusing!

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Feb 28, 2016

Owner

This isn't ideal because embedded tilesets also are editable so the tileset editing options would have to exist in both map tabs and tileset tabs. It's a bit unclear to me how this would work and look like, and it would drastically alter workflows.

My idea was to move any editing operations to the full screen tileset view and make the Tilesets view essentially read-only (providing only an "Edit" button, which would open the tileset in a document tab). For embedded tilesets, this would work exactly the same, except that changes made to the tileset would end up on the undo stack of the affected map document.

This may be a little confusing as well, but I'm not comfortable with just throwing away undo history when a user edits an external tileset also from another tab. Also, I think it will be quite hacky trying to layer your suggestion on top of the QUndoCommand/QUndoStack/QUndoGround framework. Though there isn't that much code involved in that, anyway.

I'd prefer to drop support for embedded tilesets completely, since that would simplify things a lot. I will at least try to make using external tilesets the default way of doing things, and have embedded tilesets as the special case. Embedded tilesets seem nice when you start off, but once you define any additional tileset properties you quickly run into the issue that it's hard to share that information among multiple maps.

I think your idea is quite clever to avoid any conflicts, but I'm skeptical whether it is really completely natural to the user. I'd prefer to clearly distinguish in the UI between different files, and associate an undo stack with each file.

Removing tiles from collections

One thing I'm still troubled with is dealing with changes that affect both the tileset and the maps that use it. I think there is really only one such change though, and it's the removal of tiles from image collection tilesets. When you remove a tile from a tileset, currently Tiled will also remove any usages of this tile from the map. And this is combined into a single undo macro. When the tileset is edited as a separate file, the map could still be adjusted but the macro approach is no longer possible since they have different undo stacks. So the user may then undo the map change and run into the problem that the map is referencing the removed tiles. Another way to get into this situation is to undo the addition of tiles to the tileset, after you've already started using them on the map.

I think really the only solution here is to stop referring to tile instances directly using pointers, but rather refer to them by their ID. This avoids Tiled from crashing and would allow it to display special graphics or warnings when the tile layers refers to no longer existing tiles.

Owner

bjorn commented Feb 28, 2016

This isn't ideal because embedded tilesets also are editable so the tileset editing options would have to exist in both map tabs and tileset tabs. It's a bit unclear to me how this would work and look like, and it would drastically alter workflows.

My idea was to move any editing operations to the full screen tileset view and make the Tilesets view essentially read-only (providing only an "Edit" button, which would open the tileset in a document tab). For embedded tilesets, this would work exactly the same, except that changes made to the tileset would end up on the undo stack of the affected map document.

This may be a little confusing as well, but I'm not comfortable with just throwing away undo history when a user edits an external tileset also from another tab. Also, I think it will be quite hacky trying to layer your suggestion on top of the QUndoCommand/QUndoStack/QUndoGround framework. Though there isn't that much code involved in that, anyway.

I'd prefer to drop support for embedded tilesets completely, since that would simplify things a lot. I will at least try to make using external tilesets the default way of doing things, and have embedded tilesets as the special case. Embedded tilesets seem nice when you start off, but once you define any additional tileset properties you quickly run into the issue that it's hard to share that information among multiple maps.

I think your idea is quite clever to avoid any conflicts, but I'm skeptical whether it is really completely natural to the user. I'd prefer to clearly distinguish in the UI between different files, and associate an undo stack with each file.

Removing tiles from collections

One thing I'm still troubled with is dealing with changes that affect both the tileset and the maps that use it. I think there is really only one such change though, and it's the removal of tiles from image collection tilesets. When you remove a tile from a tileset, currently Tiled will also remove any usages of this tile from the map. And this is combined into a single undo macro. When the tileset is edited as a separate file, the map could still be adjusted but the macro approach is no longer possible since they have different undo stacks. So the user may then undo the map change and run into the problem that the map is referencing the removed tiles. Another way to get into this situation is to undo the addition of tiles to the tileset, after you've already started using them on the map.

I think really the only solution here is to stop referring to tile instances directly using pointers, but rather refer to them by their ID. This avoids Tiled from crashing and would allow it to display special graphics or warnings when the tile layers refers to no longer existing tiles.

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Feb 28, 2016

Contributor

My idea was to move any editing operations to the full screen tileset view and make the Tilesets view essentially read-only (providing only an "Edit" button, which would open the tileset in a document tab). For embedded tilesets, this would work exactly the same, except that changes made to the tileset would end up on the undo stack of the affected map document.

Wouldn't it be confusing in scenarios such as:

  • Make edits to an embedded tileset from its tileset tab
  • Switch back to map tab
  • Start undoing. Changes are being undone in a tab that's not currently active. Weird.

I didn't know dropping support for embedded tilesets was something you would consider as it seems like a big breaking change. If that is acceptable, then I am absolutely positive that presenting tilesets as standalone documents (like you suggested) is by far the best option of all. All I can see in defense of embedded tilesets as a feature is:

  • Good for first-time users. Removing them means users need to create a tileset before they can create a usable map at all. This could potentially be addressed with changes in the "new map" dialog box.
  • Some people might be relying on this feature at the moment? I don't see why anyone would prefer embedded tilesets but you may have more real world data on this.

On the plus side, people's workflows might break but engines which consume maps don't have to, because embedding the tileset data in a map export should still be possible.

Removing tiles from collections

I agree with your solution here too. Does sound like a lot of work though.

Contributor

agersant commented Feb 28, 2016

My idea was to move any editing operations to the full screen tileset view and make the Tilesets view essentially read-only (providing only an "Edit" button, which would open the tileset in a document tab). For embedded tilesets, this would work exactly the same, except that changes made to the tileset would end up on the undo stack of the affected map document.

Wouldn't it be confusing in scenarios such as:

  • Make edits to an embedded tileset from its tileset tab
  • Switch back to map tab
  • Start undoing. Changes are being undone in a tab that's not currently active. Weird.

I didn't know dropping support for embedded tilesets was something you would consider as it seems like a big breaking change. If that is acceptable, then I am absolutely positive that presenting tilesets as standalone documents (like you suggested) is by far the best option of all. All I can see in defense of embedded tilesets as a feature is:

  • Good for first-time users. Removing them means users need to create a tileset before they can create a usable map at all. This could potentially be addressed with changes in the "new map" dialog box.
  • Some people might be relying on this feature at the moment? I don't see why anyone would prefer embedded tilesets but you may have more real world data on this.

On the plus side, people's workflows might break but engines which consume maps don't have to, because embedding the tileset data in a map export should still be possible.

Removing tiles from collections

I agree with your solution here too. Does sound like a lot of work though.

@Chaoseiro

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@Chaoseiro

Chaoseiro Feb 29, 2016

Hello guys. Sorry to interrupt your discussion flow, but I wanted to maybe point you both on another direction.
Editing External Tilesets would be a nice feature, but as you've mentioned it faces a lot of implementation problems and cases. But, wouldn't it be easier if this was done inside a "Project" structure?
This "Project" feature was suggested some times before: #233, #70 and #24, that I could find through a simple search.
I know that creating such structure is not an easy task. It might even be the hardest feature to implement... but I believe that not only almost everyone that uses Tiled would benefit from it, but it would make such features as editing external tilesets "easier", since by having this project structure, Tiled would know all maps that uses a certain external tileset, making it feasible to adjust all of them.
These are my 2 cents on this discussion.
Sorry for not actually helping through code, but I hope I haven't said any gibberish :P
And thanks again Bjorn and all Tiled devs for this increasingly awesome tool!

Chaoseiro commented Feb 29, 2016

Hello guys. Sorry to interrupt your discussion flow, but I wanted to maybe point you both on another direction.
Editing External Tilesets would be a nice feature, but as you've mentioned it faces a lot of implementation problems and cases. But, wouldn't it be easier if this was done inside a "Project" structure?
This "Project" feature was suggested some times before: #233, #70 and #24, that I could find through a simple search.
I know that creating such structure is not an easy task. It might even be the hardest feature to implement... but I believe that not only almost everyone that uses Tiled would benefit from it, but it would make such features as editing external tilesets "easier", since by having this project structure, Tiled would know all maps that uses a certain external tileset, making it feasible to adjust all of them.
These are my 2 cents on this discussion.
Sorry for not actually helping through code, but I hope I haven't said any gibberish :P
And thanks again Bjorn and all Tiled devs for this increasingly awesome tool!

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Feb 29, 2016

Contributor

I don't think projects are a different direction, they're more of a step further. If/when tilesets become first-class citizens (which is what this ticket is about), it could make sense to support "project" files which would store custom object types, references to maps files and references to tileset files. Much like a Visual Studio solution is a collection of code files (stored separately) and settings.

^ Note that my 2 cents aren't worth too much either as I haven't written a single line of Tiled's code (yet?).

Contributor

agersant commented Feb 29, 2016

I don't think projects are a different direction, they're more of a step further. If/when tilesets become first-class citizens (which is what this ticket is about), it could make sense to support "project" files which would store custom object types, references to maps files and references to tileset files. Much like a Visual Studio solution is a collection of code files (stored separately) and settings.

^ Note that my 2 cents aren't worth too much either as I haven't written a single line of Tiled's code (yet?).

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Feb 29, 2016

Owner

Wouldn't it be confusing in scenarios such as:

  • Make edits to an embedded tileset from its tileset tab
  • Switch back to map tab
  • Start undoing. Changes are being undone in a tab that's not currently active. Weird.

Right, I anticipated this would be a little weird and now that you point this out as well I'm convinced that it would probably be better for tilesets to have their own undo stack, even when embedded. At the same time, the "unsaved changes" state of the MapDocument should probably be based on the clean state of the undo stack of any embedded tilesets, in addition to its own undo stack. And of course saving a map would set all these undo stacks to the "clean" state.

I didn't know dropping support for embedded tilesets was something you would consider as it seems like a big breaking change.

Right, for now I don't think I can entirely remove this feature or even move it to an export-only option. But what I can do is rearrange the UI to move the embedded tilesets feature to the background.

Editing External Tilesets would be a nice feature, but as you've mentioned it faces a lot of implementation problems and cases. But, wouldn't it be easier if this was done inside a "Project" structure?

While related, introducing projects does not magically solve the problem of keeping track of changes made to external tilesets separately from a map. It would definitely be the next thing on the radar though.

Owner

bjorn commented Feb 29, 2016

Wouldn't it be confusing in scenarios such as:

  • Make edits to an embedded tileset from its tileset tab
  • Switch back to map tab
  • Start undoing. Changes are being undone in a tab that's not currently active. Weird.

Right, I anticipated this would be a little weird and now that you point this out as well I'm convinced that it would probably be better for tilesets to have their own undo stack, even when embedded. At the same time, the "unsaved changes" state of the MapDocument should probably be based on the clean state of the undo stack of any embedded tilesets, in addition to its own undo stack. And of course saving a map would set all these undo stacks to the "clean" state.

I didn't know dropping support for embedded tilesets was something you would consider as it seems like a big breaking change.

Right, for now I don't think I can entirely remove this feature or even move it to an export-only option. But what I can do is rearrange the UI to move the embedded tilesets feature to the background.

Editing External Tilesets would be a nice feature, but as you've mentioned it faces a lot of implementation problems and cases. But, wouldn't it be easier if this was done inside a "Project" structure?

While related, introducing projects does not magically solve the problem of keeping track of changes made to external tilesets separately from a map. It would definitely be the next thing on the radar though.

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Mar 5, 2016

Owner

After spending two evenings and one full day on reworking the UI to support editing maps and tilesets alongside each other, I've determined that it is a lot more work than I had anticipated. A large amount of things are no longer functional and marked with "todo" entries in the code. Before I continue, I would like to have a better worked out plan of where this is going to be sure it's the way to go.

Here's a screenshot of my current Tiled after creating a new tileset:

tiled_086

The nice thing is, we could add a tileset-specific tool bar that would have most actions currently below the Tilesets view, and which also allows switching to different modes like 'terrain edit' mode. I'm not sure yet how the collision editing and tile animation editing would best fit into this though. Ideally I'd like to integrate those as well.

Overall though, I have to be careful not to make the current workflow needlessly more complicated.

One problem I see is the menu bar, which contains largely map-specific actions. Many of them could actually be removed since they are already available through other means, or moved onto a tool bar. It seems most modern applications are doing away with menu bars, but I think they do have their place. But that place is definitely not below the tab bar.

Here's a screenshot with a map selected:

overworld tmx tiled_087

I've pushed this work to the wip/tilesetdocument branch, where the amount of changes is slowly getting out of hand, and it would be far from done. Warning: this branch only compiles with Qbs at the moment.

Any feedback is welcome.

Owner

bjorn commented Mar 5, 2016

After spending two evenings and one full day on reworking the UI to support editing maps and tilesets alongside each other, I've determined that it is a lot more work than I had anticipated. A large amount of things are no longer functional and marked with "todo" entries in the code. Before I continue, I would like to have a better worked out plan of where this is going to be sure it's the way to go.

Here's a screenshot of my current Tiled after creating a new tileset:

tiled_086

The nice thing is, we could add a tileset-specific tool bar that would have most actions currently below the Tilesets view, and which also allows switching to different modes like 'terrain edit' mode. I'm not sure yet how the collision editing and tile animation editing would best fit into this though. Ideally I'd like to integrate those as well.

Overall though, I have to be careful not to make the current workflow needlessly more complicated.

One problem I see is the menu bar, which contains largely map-specific actions. Many of them could actually be removed since they are already available through other means, or moved onto a tool bar. It seems most modern applications are doing away with menu bars, but I think they do have their place. But that place is definitely not below the tab bar.

Here's a screenshot with a map selected:

overworld tmx tiled_087

I've pushed this work to the wip/tilesetdocument branch, where the amount of changes is slowly getting out of hand, and it would be far from done. Warning: this branch only compiles with Qbs at the moment.

Any feedback is welcome.

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Mar 6, 2016

Contributor

Fantastic news. I'm glad to see work on this feature is moving forward! And that branch has impressive diffs if I've ever seen any.

Your questioning about menus and toolbars inspired me to review the existing UI and think about how it could adapt to your changes. I inspected every button which I think could potentially be affected and thought about a course of action to take (keep, remove, move, etc.). Here's the results of this thinking:

Button Suggestion Notes
File > New Keep Add submenu with Map and Tileset options.
File > Save as… Keep When in tileset tab, only offer read-write formats (tsx, json).
File > Export as… Keep When in tileset tab, only offer read-only formats (lua, js).
File > Export as image Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > New tileset Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Add external tileset Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Resize Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Crop to selection Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Offset Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Automap Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Automap while drawing Keep Always available.
Map > Map properties Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Add tile layer Move to Map menu Grey out when in tileset tab. The logic for moving this to the Map menu is that adding tilesets is done from the map menu too, and that the options in the Tileset menu should all work in a tileset tab.
Layer > Add object layer Move to Map menu Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Add image layer Move to Map menu Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Duplicate layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Merge layer down Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Remove layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Select next/previous layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Raise/lower layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Show/hide all other layers layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Layer properties Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
View > Highlight current layer Keep Always available.
View > Show tile object outlines Keep Always available.
View > Tile animation editor Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab. Long-term goals: move to views and toolbars, remove tileset view from this and allow dragging from tileset tab. Edit: I'm dumb and didn't think about how dragging would not conflict with choosing a tile to animate.
View > Tile collision editor Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab. Long-term goal: move to views and toolbars.
Main toolbar > New map Remove
Main toolbar > Open Remove
Main toolbar > Save Remove
Main toolbar > Undo/Redo Remove
Main toolbar > Execute command Move to Command menu One option per command, one option at the bottom for "Edit commands".
Main toolbar > Random mode Move to Map menu Give this a shortcut.
Tools > everything Move to below tab bar in map tabs
Tileset panel > New tileset Keep Opens dropdown to choose embedded vs/ external tileset.
Tileset panel > Import tileset Keep Rename to "embed tileset", hide for embedded tilesets.
Tileset panel > Export tileset as… Keep Rename to "disembed tileset", hide for external tilesets. Only allow read/write tileset formats.
Tileset panel > Add tile Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab and for tileset-image based tilesets. Also available from right click in tileset tab.
Tileset panel > Remove tile Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab and for tileset-image based tilesets. Also available from right click on image in tileset tab.
Tileset panel > Edit terrain Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab. Long-term goal: move terrain list to views and toolbars, paint terrain directly in tileset tab.
Tileset panel > Tileset properties Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab.
Tileset panel > Remove tileset Keep

The TL;DR version of this table would be:

  • Remove main toolbar
  • Move map tools below tab bar
  • Add a tileset menu
  • Add a command menu
  • Move tileset editing popups to separate panels

Here is a paintover of your screenshot with some of these suggestions added:
Mockup

An interesting question that also needs to be answered is "what to do with panels that are not usable for the current file" (eg. animation panel for maps, mini-map panel for tilesets). I can see two options here:

  • Grey them out and disable input
  • Do not display them, have Tiled remember two layouts setup by the user (one for tilesets and one for maps). This would be similar to Visual Studio allowing different layouts for code editing and debugging (eg. hide breakpoint window while writing code).

Hopefully this will help or give you a few ideas :3

Contributor

agersant commented Mar 6, 2016

Fantastic news. I'm glad to see work on this feature is moving forward! And that branch has impressive diffs if I've ever seen any.

Your questioning about menus and toolbars inspired me to review the existing UI and think about how it could adapt to your changes. I inspected every button which I think could potentially be affected and thought about a course of action to take (keep, remove, move, etc.). Here's the results of this thinking:

Button Suggestion Notes
File > New Keep Add submenu with Map and Tileset options.
File > Save as… Keep When in tileset tab, only offer read-write formats (tsx, json).
File > Export as… Keep When in tileset tab, only offer read-only formats (lua, js).
File > Export as image Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > New tileset Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Add external tileset Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Resize Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Crop to selection Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Offset Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Automap Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Map > Automap while drawing Keep Always available.
Map > Map properties Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Add tile layer Move to Map menu Grey out when in tileset tab. The logic for moving this to the Map menu is that adding tilesets is done from the map menu too, and that the options in the Tileset menu should all work in a tileset tab.
Layer > Add object layer Move to Map menu Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Add image layer Move to Map menu Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Duplicate layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Merge layer down Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Remove layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Select next/previous layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Raise/lower layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Show/hide all other layers layer Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
Layer > Layer properties Keep Grey out when in tileset tab.
View > Highlight current layer Keep Always available.
View > Show tile object outlines Keep Always available.
View > Tile animation editor Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab. Long-term goals: move to views and toolbars, remove tileset view from this and allow dragging from tileset tab. Edit: I'm dumb and didn't think about how dragging would not conflict with choosing a tile to animate.
View > Tile collision editor Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab. Long-term goal: move to views and toolbars.
Main toolbar > New map Remove
Main toolbar > Open Remove
Main toolbar > Save Remove
Main toolbar > Undo/Redo Remove
Main toolbar > Execute command Move to Command menu One option per command, one option at the bottom for "Edit commands".
Main toolbar > Random mode Move to Map menu Give this a shortcut.
Tools > everything Move to below tab bar in map tabs
Tileset panel > New tileset Keep Opens dropdown to choose embedded vs/ external tileset.
Tileset panel > Import tileset Keep Rename to "embed tileset", hide for embedded tilesets.
Tileset panel > Export tileset as… Keep Rename to "disembed tileset", hide for external tilesets. Only allow read/write tileset formats.
Tileset panel > Add tile Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab and for tileset-image based tilesets. Also available from right click in tileset tab.
Tileset panel > Remove tile Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab and for tileset-image based tilesets. Also available from right click on image in tileset tab.
Tileset panel > Edit terrain Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab. Long-term goal: move terrain list to views and toolbars, paint terrain directly in tileset tab.
Tileset panel > Tileset properties Move to Tileset menu Greyed out in map tab.
Tileset panel > Remove tileset Keep

The TL;DR version of this table would be:

  • Remove main toolbar
  • Move map tools below tab bar
  • Add a tileset menu
  • Add a command menu
  • Move tileset editing popups to separate panels

Here is a paintover of your screenshot with some of these suggestions added:
Mockup

An interesting question that also needs to be answered is "what to do with panels that are not usable for the current file" (eg. animation panel for maps, mini-map panel for tilesets). I can see two options here:

  • Grey them out and disable input
  • Do not display them, have Tiled remember two layouts setup by the user (one for tilesets and one for maps). This would be similar to Visual Studio allowing different layouts for code editing and debugging (eg. hide breakpoint window while writing code).

Hopefully this will help or give you a few ideas :3

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Mar 6, 2016

Owner

I've tried this embedded main window on OS X and Windows and didn't like how it looks. That's why I've attempted to implement this using mode switching on a single main window. However, when I got it to sort-of work I already noticed that it wasn't going to work either, mainly because we really can't have the tab bar potentially shift about as a result of switching documents.

So I'm back at the embedded main windows and will just try making it look decent. I've already made the File Open action work on both maps and tilesets and will continue solving other problems, including things you suggested.

I had actually written a response here earlier while booted into Windows, but apparently it got lost. In any case I basically said that the introduction of "Tileset" and "Command" menus make total sense. But I would not move the actions to add new layers out of the Layer menu, because I think people expect them where they are. I really like the amount of thought you're putting into this, which definitely helps me through this change. Thanks!

Owner

bjorn commented Mar 6, 2016

I've tried this embedded main window on OS X and Windows and didn't like how it looks. That's why I've attempted to implement this using mode switching on a single main window. However, when I got it to sort-of work I already noticed that it wasn't going to work either, mainly because we really can't have the tab bar potentially shift about as a result of switching documents.

So I'm back at the embedded main windows and will just try making it look decent. I've already made the File Open action work on both maps and tilesets and will continue solving other problems, including things you suggested.

I had actually written a response here earlier while booted into Windows, but apparently it got lost. In any case I basically said that the introduction of "Tileset" and "Command" menus make total sense. But I would not move the actions to add new layers out of the Layer menu, because I think people expect them where they are. I really like the amount of thought you're putting into this, which definitely helps me through this change. Thanks!

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Mar 6, 2016

Contributor

Thanks for the update! I skimmed through the live-coding session to see the two modes in action. I'm really curious to see what the embedded main window setup looks like on Windows (and OS X). Hopefully it's possible to make it look decent, I much prefer it over the single main window.

A few notes, mostly trying to explain the reasoning behind some of my earlier suggestions or elaborate on them:

But I would not move the actions to add new layers out of the Layer menu, because I think people expect them where they are.

I think that is true at the moment but probably will change after the introduction of a Tileset menu. If the Layer menu had "Add layer" in it, you'd expect the Tileset menu to have an "Add tileset" entry. However, the Tileset menu is all about editing a tileset so we don't want to put "Add tileset" there.
Ultimately, it makes more sense to put operations that affect the map (adding a tileset, adding a layer) in the Map menu, and restrict the Tileset/Layer menus to operations which affect their respective object.

In the livestream, I noticed you had the main toolbar between the menus and the tabs. I don't know if that's how you intend to keep it but I think there's a good case to be made for its removal (or hiding by default):

  • It uses a lot of vertical space for only a few icons. Pretty ugly :c
  • All these icons have well-known shortcuts (open is Ctrl+O, undo is Ctrl+S, etc.), except for Command (most likely not used very intensely) and Random Mode (could use a shortcut).
  • For users who don't like shortcuts, the actual menu options are mere pixels away from the icons.

Keep up the good work!

Contributor

agersant commented Mar 6, 2016

Thanks for the update! I skimmed through the live-coding session to see the two modes in action. I'm really curious to see what the embedded main window setup looks like on Windows (and OS X). Hopefully it's possible to make it look decent, I much prefer it over the single main window.

A few notes, mostly trying to explain the reasoning behind some of my earlier suggestions or elaborate on them:

But I would not move the actions to add new layers out of the Layer menu, because I think people expect them where they are.

I think that is true at the moment but probably will change after the introduction of a Tileset menu. If the Layer menu had "Add layer" in it, you'd expect the Tileset menu to have an "Add tileset" entry. However, the Tileset menu is all about editing a tileset so we don't want to put "Add tileset" there.
Ultimately, it makes more sense to put operations that affect the map (adding a tileset, adding a layer) in the Map menu, and restrict the Tileset/Layer menus to operations which affect their respective object.

In the livestream, I noticed you had the main toolbar between the menus and the tabs. I don't know if that's how you intend to keep it but I think there's a good case to be made for its removal (or hiding by default):

  • It uses a lot of vertical space for only a few icons. Pretty ugly :c
  • All these icons have well-known shortcuts (open is Ctrl+O, undo is Ctrl+S, etc.), except for Command (most likely not used very intensely) and Random Mode (could use a shortcut).
  • For users who don't like shortcuts, the actual menu options are mere pixels away from the icons.

Keep up the good work!

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Mar 6, 2016

Owner

I'm really curious to see what the embedded main window setup looks like on Windows (and OS X).

If you're on Windows, you can look for the latest installer based on the wip/tilesetdocument branch at AppVeyor. Just click on a build, then click either the 32-bit or the 64-bit job and finally click to "Artifacts".

Ultimately, it makes more sense to put operations that affect the map (adding a tileset, adding a layer) in the Map menu, and restrict the Tileset/Layer menus to operations which affect their respective object.

It sounds reasonable, but consistency with other applications also matters. In GIMP for example, you add layers from the Layer menu, and not from the Image menu. Hence I'm not even entirely convinced that the 'New Tileset' action shouldn't be in the 'Tileset' menu, although your reasoning makes total sense.

In the livestream, I noticed you had the main toolbar between the menus and the tabs. I don't know if that's how you intend to keep it but I think there's a good case to be made for its removal (or hiding by default):

Of course I didn't intend to keep it that way and in the followup screencast of today (starting at around 58:30) you can see how I've built a new MainToolBar to replace the previous "Main Toolbar", which is used by the MapEditor and TilesetEditor classes. :-)

Owner

bjorn commented Mar 6, 2016

I'm really curious to see what the embedded main window setup looks like on Windows (and OS X).

If you're on Windows, you can look for the latest installer based on the wip/tilesetdocument branch at AppVeyor. Just click on a build, then click either the 32-bit or the 64-bit job and finally click to "Artifacts".

Ultimately, it makes more sense to put operations that affect the map (adding a tileset, adding a layer) in the Map menu, and restrict the Tileset/Layer menus to operations which affect their respective object.

It sounds reasonable, but consistency with other applications also matters. In GIMP for example, you add layers from the Layer menu, and not from the Image menu. Hence I'm not even entirely convinced that the 'New Tileset' action shouldn't be in the 'Tileset' menu, although your reasoning makes total sense.

In the livestream, I noticed you had the main toolbar between the menus and the tabs. I don't know if that's how you intend to keep it but I think there's a good case to be made for its removal (or hiding by default):

Of course I didn't intend to keep it that way and in the followup screencast of today (starting at around 58:30) you can see how I've built a new MainToolBar to replace the previous "Main Toolbar", which is used by the MapEditor and TilesetEditor classes. :-)

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Mar 6, 2016

Owner

Here's a screenshot from OS X

screen shot 2016-03-06 at 20 48 26

Owner

bjorn commented Mar 6, 2016

Here's a screenshot from OS X

screen shot 2016-03-06 at 20 48 26

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Mar 6, 2016

Contributor

New main toolbar from the screencast looks great.

I just took a screenshot on Windows:

Windows

It's not nearly as bad as I imagined. I'd say the only really ugly thing is the 1px border above the Layers panel and Properties panel. Is it something Qt would let you tweak?

Contributor

agersant commented Mar 6, 2016

New main toolbar from the screencast looks great.

I just took a screenshot on Windows:

Windows

It's not nearly as bad as I imagined. I'd say the only really ugly thing is the 1px border above the Layers panel and Properties panel. Is it something Qt would let you tweak?

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Mar 6, 2016

Owner

It's not nearly as bad as I imagined. I'd say the only really ugly thing is the 1px border above the Layers panel and Properties panel. Is it something Qt would let you tweak?

Ah, not easily I think. Besides, that same border sits below the entire tool bar and removing it would look strange above the map view I think. The main thing that bothered me was the gray background on the tab bar, which I think would be better if it blended in with the menu bar.

I see that you've got the still shared "History" view open. What do you think about that? Should I instead make two instances of this, one for each embedded main window? On the upside it would allow it to be placed more space-efficiently, but on the downside it would not always be in the same place depending on how you placed it in the different main windows.

The same problem exists for the Maps dock. When I instantiate two of those I'd even need to make them synchronize to the same folder. And the Debug Console, for which it really would be nice to avoid multiple instances.

Owner

bjorn commented Mar 6, 2016

It's not nearly as bad as I imagined. I'd say the only really ugly thing is the 1px border above the Layers panel and Properties panel. Is it something Qt would let you tweak?

Ah, not easily I think. Besides, that same border sits below the entire tool bar and removing it would look strange above the map view I think. The main thing that bothered me was the gray background on the tab bar, which I think would be better if it blended in with the menu bar.

I see that you've got the still shared "History" view open. What do you think about that? Should I instead make two instances of this, one for each embedded main window? On the upside it would allow it to be placed more space-efficiently, but on the downside it would not always be in the same place depending on how you placed it in the different main windows.

The same problem exists for the Maps dock. When I instantiate two of those I'd even need to make them synchronize to the same folder. And the Debug Console, for which it really would be nice to avoid multiple instances.

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Mar 6, 2016

Contributor

The main thing that bothered me was the gray background on the tab bar, which I think would be better if it blended in with the menu bar.

I agree it would look better but I barely noticed it, other tabs in Tiled (see Terrains/Tilesets or Mini-map/Objects in my screenshot) have similar behavior. I wonder what Qt maintainers think about this, assuming other applications are affected too.

I see that you've got the still shared "History" view open. What do you think about that?

I think would prefer to have an instance of the History panel inside each main window. Having it sit "inside" the tab bar makes it more obvious that it's specific to the file in this tab. Your concerns about the layout being inconsistent different main windows could be alleviated by the layout saving thing I mentioned at the end of my comment which had the long table of suggestions.
Essentially, Tiled would remember:

  • Which panels the user wants to see while he edits a map and where he wants them.
  • Which panels the user wants to see while he edits a tileset and where he wants them.

When switching from a map to another map, or a tileset to another tileset, layout would stay exactly the same (ie. changes "carry over" to other tabs). When switching between map and tileset, the layout would snap back to the preferred setup for that usage.
This would become even more relevant and useful if one or more of the tileset tools (terrain, animation, collision) end up becoming dockable panels.

As for the Maps and Debug Console panels, these aren't connected in any meaningful way to the content of the tab so I would keep them outside of the main windows. Especially considering the "Maps" panel may become some sort of "Project" tab one day. They would also not be part of this dual-Layout-saving feature I mentioned above.

Contributor

agersant commented Mar 6, 2016

The main thing that bothered me was the gray background on the tab bar, which I think would be better if it blended in with the menu bar.

I agree it would look better but I barely noticed it, other tabs in Tiled (see Terrains/Tilesets or Mini-map/Objects in my screenshot) have similar behavior. I wonder what Qt maintainers think about this, assuming other applications are affected too.

I see that you've got the still shared "History" view open. What do you think about that?

I think would prefer to have an instance of the History panel inside each main window. Having it sit "inside" the tab bar makes it more obvious that it's specific to the file in this tab. Your concerns about the layout being inconsistent different main windows could be alleviated by the layout saving thing I mentioned at the end of my comment which had the long table of suggestions.
Essentially, Tiled would remember:

  • Which panels the user wants to see while he edits a map and where he wants them.
  • Which panels the user wants to see while he edits a tileset and where he wants them.

When switching from a map to another map, or a tileset to another tileset, layout would stay exactly the same (ie. changes "carry over" to other tabs). When switching between map and tileset, the layout would snap back to the preferred setup for that usage.
This would become even more relevant and useful if one or more of the tileset tools (terrain, animation, collision) end up becoming dockable panels.

As for the Maps and Debug Console panels, these aren't connected in any meaningful way to the content of the tab so I would keep them outside of the main windows. Especially considering the "Maps" panel may become some sort of "Project" tab one day. They would also not be part of this dual-Layout-saving feature I mentioned above.

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Mar 12, 2016

Contributor

When you start a new tileset, it now opens in its own tab. How do you start using it on any open map? Should Tiled show all open tilesets in the Tilesets view and automatically determine the list of tilesets used by a map? Is it a problem that you would then no longer be able to choose a specific tileset order? And is then a separate action needed to remove any usage of a certain tileset from a map?

(from Development Update)

I would expect the workflow to be:

  • Create new tileset
  • Save new tileset somewhere on disk
  • Back in map tab, add external tileset

I don't think that's an unreasonable number of user inputs for what it does. Things could be a little more user friendly if "Add external tileset" could let users choose from either a file browsing dialog box or a list containing currently open tilesets and tilesets in use by currently open maps.
This would most likely become redundant when/if projects are added later on though.

Contributor

agersant commented Mar 12, 2016

When you start a new tileset, it now opens in its own tab. How do you start using it on any open map? Should Tiled show all open tilesets in the Tilesets view and automatically determine the list of tilesets used by a map? Is it a problem that you would then no longer be able to choose a specific tileset order? And is then a separate action needed to remove any usage of a certain tileset from a map?

(from Development Update)

I would expect the workflow to be:

  • Create new tileset
  • Save new tileset somewhere on disk
  • Back in map tab, add external tileset

I don't think that's an unreasonable number of user inputs for what it does. Things could be a little more user friendly if "Add external tileset" could let users choose from either a file browsing dialog box or a list containing currently open tilesets and tilesets in use by currently open maps.
This would most likely become redundant when/if projects are added later on though.

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Dec 12, 2016

Owner

Today I've merged the wip/tilesetdocument branch to master, after working on it in parallel to master for the past 9 months. I've also updated the snapshot branch, so snapshot builds will be updating soon (I'll make sure the macOS snapshot is updated tomorrow).

This essentially resolves this issue, but since it's such a huge change I'll leave it open for a bit and am eager to hear your feedback! I'll also have to go over @agersant's suggestions once more to see if there are any changes that still should be done (like putting the History view inside each editor, rather than at the top level).

Owner

bjorn commented Dec 12, 2016

Today I've merged the wip/tilesetdocument branch to master, after working on it in parallel to master for the past 9 months. I've also updated the snapshot branch, so snapshot builds will be updating soon (I'll make sure the macOS snapshot is updated tomorrow).

This essentially resolves this issue, but since it's such a huge change I'll leave it open for a bit and am eager to hear your feedback! I'll also have to go over @agersant's suggestions once more to see if there are any changes that still should be done (like putting the History view inside each editor, rather than at the top level).

@agersant

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@agersant

agersant Dec 13, 2016

Contributor

Fantastic news! I am very very happy to see this feature landing in master. Thank you for making it happen!

Contributor

agersant commented Dec 13, 2016

Fantastic news! I am very very happy to see this feature landing in master. Thank you for making it happen!

@bjorn

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@bjorn

bjorn Feb 7, 2017

Owner

After going over the feedback once more, I've just made a few remaining actions to the Tilesets menu and I'll close this issue.

Changes that could still be made, but are not technically part of this issue:

  • Adding Commands menu (I consider it covered by #943)
  • Changing Collision Editor to a dock (essentially covered by #1160)
Owner

bjorn commented Feb 7, 2017

After going over the feedback once more, I've just made a few remaining actions to the Tilesets menu and I'll close this issue.

Changes that could still be made, but are not technically part of this issue:

  • Adding Commands menu (I consider it covered by #943)
  • Changing Collision Editor to a dock (essentially covered by #1160)

@bjorn bjorn closed this Feb 7, 2017

@bjorn bjorn moved this from In Progress to Recently completed in Roadmap Feb 13, 2017

@bjorn bjorn removed this from Recently Completed in Roadmap Nov 21, 2017

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment