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Github doesn't handle linking from Markdown to static HTML files in s…

…ource very well
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commit 232f7231f2d85c0dbac79eb6cdbf4b7dd58c951b 1 parent b8d19b6
Brendan Kidwell authored
Showing with 5 additions and 5 deletions.
  1. +2 −2 README.html
  2. +3 −3 README.md
4 README.html
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@@ -47,9 +47,9 @@ <h2 id="usage">Usage</h2>
<pre><code>mdepub extract ~/Path/Filename.epub
</code></pre>
<h2 id="starting-your-markdown-source-file">Starting Your Markdown Source File</h2>
-<p>Metadata for the compiled Epub file is specified in <code>options.yaml</code>. See <a href="doc/options.html">doc/options.html</a> for details.</p>
+<p>Metadata for the compiled Epub file is specified in <code>options.yaml</code>. See <code>doc/options.html</code> for details.</p>
<p>mdepub assumes the entire ebook source text is contained in a single <code>.md</code>. Stylesheet information is given in a <code>.css</code> file with the same name. Any attached images can be included in an <code>images/</code> subdirectory in your project; be sure you link to the images in your source using relative paths, for example <code>images/author.jpg</code>.</p>
-<p>mdepub uses Pandoc to convert Markdown syntax to strict XHTML. If you are not familiar with Markdown, see this <a href="doc/pandoc_markdown.html">cheat sheet</a>.</p>
+<p>mdepub uses Pandoc to convert Markdown syntax to strict XHTML. If you are not familiar with Markdown, see the cheat sheet in <code>doc/pandoc_markdown.html</code>.</p>
<p>If you're starting a project from text that's already in a computer file or files, it's a good idea to include that in your project in an <code>upstream</code> directory. In case you ever have to refer back to it, this directory will be included in the <code>source.mdepub.zip</code> along with all other project files when you compile the Epub file. If your source is in a format that Pandoc can read, such as HTML, you can use Pandoc to convert it to Markdown to get you started. See <a href="http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/README.html">Pandoc's User Guide</a> for details.</p>
<p><strong>Headings:</strong> There should only be one H1 (denoted by a single <code>#</code> in Markdown) in your source file; this is the title of the book. Front matter should be placed before the first chapter heading (<code>##</code>).</p>
<p><strong>Page breaks:</strong> Each chapter will start with a page break. Additional page breaks can be added by wrapping a block of text in</p>
6 README.md
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@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ the current directory (so you can edit and repackage it):
Metadata for the compiled Epub file is specified in `options.yaml`. See
-[doc/options.html](doc/options.html) for details.
+`doc/options.html` for details.
mdepub assumes the entire ebook source text is contained in a single
`.md`. Stylesheet information is given in a `.css` file with the same
@@ -79,8 +79,8 @@ in your project; be sure you link to the images in your source using
relative paths, for example `images/author.jpg`.
mdepub uses Pandoc to convert Markdown syntax to strict XHTML. If you
-are not familiar with Markdown, see this
-[cheat sheet](doc/pandoc_markdown.html).
+are not familiar with Markdown, see the cheat sheet in
+`doc/pandoc_markdown.html`.
If you're starting a project from text that's already in a computer file
or files, it's a good idea to include that in your project in an
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