Label improvements: emoji, descriptions, and more

Organizing issues and pull requests with labels can help you manage the chaos and be more productive. To support your labeling efforts and make labels even more useful, we've made a few enhancements.

Using emoji in labels

Emoji

When words are just not enough, include emoji in your labels to express yourself and the needs of your project through tiny images.

Descriptions

Add descriptions to your labels to provide even more context and help your contributors apply the right ones to their issues or pull requests. Descriptions will appear when you hover your mouse over labels around GitHub.

Search

Now that labels include descriptions, we've added search to the "Labels" page of each repository to help you find the one you're looking for. Filtering labels in the sidebar of your issue or pull request also filters by description.

Preview

When editing a label, you'll now see a preview of how it will appear once you save it. Use this preview to choose the perfect color or see how your emoji look.

API and Enterprise support for these features is coming soon!

Learn more about using and editing labels on GitHub

Commit together with co-authors

With faster onboarding for junior developers, increased code quality, and more thorough code review, it's easy to see why more developers than ever are writing code collaboratively. Your team's (and our own) great results from social coding motivated us to popularize the pull request—and more recently—bring real-time collaboration to your text editor with Teletype for Atom. Today, we're building on these tools with support for multiple commit authors.

Commit co-authors makes it easy to see who has contributed to every commit, regardless of how many contributors there are—and every author gets attribution in the pull request and in their contribution graph.

coauthors-new

How it works

To add co-authors to a commit, just add one or more "Co-authored-by" trailers to the end of the commit message:

Commit message

Co-authored-by: Joel Califa <602352+califa@users.noreply.github.com>
Co-authored-by: Matt Clark <44023+mclark@users.noreply.github.com>

Include your trailers at the end of your commit message, and have at least one line of white space before them.

Learn more about using trailers

Try co-authors out today anywhere on the GitHub platform, including GitHub Desktop.

Multiple issue and pull request templates

Issue and pull request templates help teams gather the right information from the beginning of a thread, but sometimes one template just isn't enough. Now project maintainers can have and use multiple templates in their repositories.

feature request template

To add multiple issue templates to a repository create an ISSUE_TEMPLATE/ directory in your project root. Within that ISSUE_TEMPLATE/ directory you can create as many issue templates as you need, for example ISSUE_TEMPLATE/bugs.md. To use those issue templates add ?template= and your template name to the new issue URL. Continuing the example, if you create the template bugs.md you add ?template=bugs.md to the new issue URL, so it becomes /issues/new?template=bugs.md.

bug request template

Your default ISSUE_TEMPLATE.md files will continue to work as the default when a template isn't specified in the new issue URL. Pull request templates follow the same pattern: add a directory called PULL_REQUEST_TEMPLATE to the root directory of your repository, and add the ?template= to your pull request URLs. And if you're worried about extra clutter in the root directory of your project, all of these directories work within the .github folder as well

To read more or learn about additional options, check out the documentation.

Report content directly to GitHub Support

Repository owners, collaborators, and prior contributors to a public repository can now more easily report comments, issues, pull requests, and commit comments to GitHub Support.

Reportable comment

Selecting the icon above will open a new contact form where you can provide more information and additional screenshots. You can also let us know whether it's a spammy, harmful, or off-topic comment.

Contact support form

Comment authors also have the ability to report their own comments if another person has edited their comment in an abusive manner.

Report your own comment if edited by another person

Check out the documentation to learn more about reporting comments.

The newest apps on GitHub Marketplace

marketplace-jan18-blog-emails

This month, we're introducing two new apps to help you monitor your APIs and improve productivity by measuring team dynamics. Head over to GitHub Marketplace to discover new tools for building better software.

REST API monitoring

Moesif provides real-time visibility into your live API traffic with advanced analytics so you never miss a beat. Analyze customer usage on your API and deeply understand every error, and prevent minor issues from becoming major outages through passive monitoring of your live API traffic. You can even recieve automatic alerts to API problems with integrations for Slack and PagerDuty.

Measuring team dynamics

DeepAffects is an emotional analytics application for managers and team leads to get issue-level insights that improve team dynamics and productivity. DeepAffects analyzes emotional queues and tones in issue descriptions and comments to help identify high-resolution time issues or disagreements within teams. Monitor and measure happiness, trust, and conflicts among team members to determine overall impact on projects. DeepAffects provides you with information that can help you build and organize higher performing teams.

Ready to try out these new additions? See how they can help your team work better or discover even more tools in GitHub Marketplace.

Track the progress of your projects

Get a more complete overview of how each of your projects is going. Now you'll see a progress bar that tracks the to do, in progress, and done cards and visualizes the progress of each of your projects.

Project progress bars

With this update, you can also track project boards from other repositories and organizations with more context. Enter the URL of any project on GitHub into the note field to create a project summary card—a detail card like the recently released issue summary cards. Your existing cards will update automatically, so there's no need to manually upgrade your project boards.

Project summary cards

Check out the documentation to learn more about tracking your project's progress, including how to disable tracking for long-running projects and other boards you'd prefer not to track.

New in Marketplace: tools for testing, project management, and more

marketplace-dec2017-header

This month, we’re introducing a few new apps to help you write, manage, and deploy code. To see what's new and find more ways to work better, head to GitHub Marketplace.

Testing
TestQuality provides modern and powerful test plan management that's seamlessly integrated with GitHub. Test Management workflows are extended, so you can create, update, delete, and link defects and requirements in your repository without ever leaving your testing workflows. Best of all, TestQuality is completely free for use with public repositories on GitHub.

Project management
Issue.sh integrates natively with GitHub to provide agile project management with fine-grained permissions. The app includes issue boards, story points, finish time estimation, burndown charts, and more. Developers don't have to switch contexts, and project managers can get total visibility into the development process.

Publishing
Pageclip is a simple way to save form data from your website. Collect leads for your new product, set up a contact form, capture emails for a newsletter, or create white-labeled survey forms—all from your static website and without a server.

Security
BackHub creates daily recurring backups of all your public and private repositories, keeping an up-to-date backup with up to three months of snapshots. Backups include the repository and all metadata including the wikis, issues, and pull requests associated with it.

Deployment
Take care of your application instead of focusing on Capistrano and the asset pipeline. Cloud 66 for Rails provides everything you need to run production-ready Rails and Rack apps on any cloud and under your cloud account.

Continuous integration
Cloud 66 Skycap is a container-native CI/CD solution that allows you to build your image from source code in a reliable and repeatable way by taking code from your Git repository and running your Docker build workflow step-by-step. Skycap can also produce more than one image and comes with an intuitive interface and private Docker repository.

Ready to try out these new additions? See how they can help your team work better or discover even more tools in GitHub Marketplace.

Use any theme with GitHub Pages

Just over a year ago Jekyll, the open source project that powers GitHub Pages, introduced shared themes. Since then, you've been able to use about a dozen themes to change the look and feel of your GitHub Pages site.

Starting today, you can use any of the hundreds of community-curated themes on GitHub.com. To build your site with any public, GitHub-hosted theme, add the following to your site's _config.yml file:

remote_theme: owner/name

Replacing owner and name with the repository's owner and name.

And if you're interested in making your Jekyll theme available to other users, simply follow the instructions for creating a Gem-based theme, and ensure the repository is public.

For more information, see the Jekyll theme documentation or get in touch.

Introducing team discussions

Working together on software is so much more than writing code. Processes like planning, analysis, design, user research, documentation, and general project decision-making all play a part in the build process. Now there's a new way to talk through projects with your team.

Demo of team discussions

Give every conversation a home (and a URL)

Team discussions provide your team and organization members a place to share information with each other. Gone are the days of having your issues cluttered with discussions or your pull requests flooded with lengthy conversations that aren’t related to your code changes. Team discussions give those conversations a home and a URL on GitHub, so they can be shared easily across the platform or saved to reference later.

Start discussions from your dashboard

To get started with team discussions, navigate to your dashboard while logged in and choose a team from the new "Your teams" section on the right sidebar. Then click on your team to go to the discussion view. From there you can start a new discussion or join in on an existing one.

Chat with your team in public or private

All organization members can see your discussion posts by default. Mark your post as private if you have something more sensitive to share. Only direct team members will have access to the private post and its replies.

Screenshot of a private post

Building on top of the nested teams functionality, notifications cascade from parent to children teams making it even easier to share important information throughout your organization.

Screenshot of team discussions

Get updates on conversations you care about

Having trouble staying in the know about what other teams within your organization are working on? Watch a team that you're not a member of to stay up to date on their public discussion activity. If you’re worried about getting too many notifications, that's okay, too! You can always subscribe or unsubscribe to individual posts or decide to un-watch an entire team if the flow of information is too much.

Screenshot of team discussions view

Support for team discussions in the GitHub API v3 and v4 and GitHub Enterprise is coming soon—and stay tuned for even more features, and functionality. Our goal is to provide you with a place to organize your thoughts, discuss ideas, and work through your team's toughest problems on GitHub.

To learn more, check out the documentation!

Introducing security alerts on GitHub

Last month, we made it easier for you to keep track of the projects your code depends on with the dependency graph, currently supported in Javascript and Ruby. Today, for the over 75 percent of GitHub projects that have dependencies, we’re helping you do more than see those important projects. With your dependency graph enabled, we’ll now notify you when we detect a vulnerability in one of your dependencies and suggest known fixes from the GitHub community.

Security Alerts & Suggested Fix

How to start using security alerts

Whether your projects are private or public, security alerts get vital vulnerability information to the right people on your team.

Enable your dependency graph

Public repositories will automatically have your dependency graph and security alerts enabled. For private repositories, you’ll need to opt in to security alerts in your repository settings or by allowing access in the Dependency graph section of your repository’s Insights tab.

Set notification preferences

When your dependency graph is enabled, admins will receive security alerts by default. Admins can also add teams or individuals as recipients for security alerts in the dependency graph settings.

Respond to alerts

When we notify you about a potential vulnerability, we’ll highlight any dependencies that we recommend updating. If a known safe version exists, we’ll select one using machine learning and publicly available data, and include it in our suggestion.

Vulnerability coverage

Vulnerabilities that have CVE IDs (publicly disclosed vulnerabilities from the National Vulnerability Database) will be included in security alerts. However, not all vulnerabilities have CVE IDs—even many publicly disclosed vulnerabilities don't have them. We'll continue to get better at identifying vulnerabilities as our security data grows. For more help managing security issues, check out our security partners in the GitHub Marketplace.

This is the next step in using the world’s largest collection of open source data to help you keep code safer and do your best work. The dependency graph and security alerts currently support Javascript and Ruby—with Python support coming in 2018.

Learn more about security alerts

Introducing Teletype for Atom: Code collaboratively in real time

Work together in real time with Atom Teletype

Writing code with other developers can be a great way to onboard teammates, get to know how your peers think, and learn new skills. Unfortunately, writing code together can be difficult to coordinate.

Now social coding is easier than ever with Teletype for Atom—a new way to dive right into code with remote collaborators. Work together in real time with your own configurations in your own programming environment on any file you can open in Atom.

Today we’re releasing the Teletype package in beta, but there’s so much more to come. Visit teletype.atom.io to start coding together in Atom today.

Get started

Seamless collaboration with Teletype

Collaborate seamlessly

Talk through a review without latency. With Teletype, you can invite one or more of your teammates to jump right into the code. Everyone gets a cursor, and everyone can type at the same time.

Bring your own configurations

Share your code without giving up your configurations. Sharing is at the keystroke-level rather than at the pixel-level, so you can collaborate with your own key bindings, packages, and themes.

Connect peer-to-peer

All data flows over encrypted peer-to-peer connections. Our servers never see your files or edits, which maximizes your privacy and minimizes latency between you and your collaborators, regardless of your proximity to our data centers.

Build on Teletype

Best of all, Teletype is free and open source. As we continue along our roadmap and take Teletype beyond beta, we hope to see community contributors build on and extend it to other editors.

Today’s beta release is just the beginning of social coding with Atom. Our list of improvements includes support for voice communication and editor-agnostic collaboration. To learn more about Teletype and find out where it’s headed next, check out our post on the Atom Blog.

Archiving repositories

Just because a repository isn't actively developed anymore and you don't want to accept additional contributions doesn't mean you want to delete it. Now archive repositories on GitHub to make them read-only.

archived repository banner

Archiving a repository makes it read-only to everyone (including repository owners). This includes editing the repository, issues, pull requests, labels, milestones, projects, wiki, releases, commits, tags, branches, reactions and comments. No one can create new issues, pull requests, or comments on an archived repository, but you can still fork archived repositories—allowing development to continue elsewhere for archived open source projects.

To archive a repository, go to your Repository Settings Page and click Archive this repository.

archive repository button

Before archiving your repository, make sure you've changed its settings and consider closing all open issues and pull requests. You should also update your README and description to make it clear to visitors that it's no longer possible to contribute.

If you change your mind and want to unarchive your repository, click Unarchive this repository in the same place. Please note that most archived repository settings are hidden and you'll have to unarchive the repository to change them.

archived labelled repository

To learn more, check out the documentation on archiving repositories. Happy archiving!

Search repositories by license

Now you can look for repositories by their license. Search for a specific license using a query such as license:mit or license:gpl-3.0 or find repositories licensed under a particular license family—Creative Commons, for example—with a query such as license:cc. We've added a new license filter on the Advanced Search page to help you craft the right query.

License picker, advanced search page

With this update, you'll also see repository licenses in even more places around GitHub: organization and user profiles, the new Discover Repositories tab, and in search results.

License info in search results

We hope having license information more readily available will help you find projects you'd like to contribute to, as well as useful projects that fit your licensing requirements. To learn more, check out the documentation on searching repositories by license.

Connect with developers around the world on the GitHub Community Forum

Introducing GitHub Community Forum

The open source community proves that when creative people get together on an open platform, great things happen: Code gets better, new technologies emerge, and the way we build software changes. Now there’s a new way to connect with developers around the world. Join the GitHub Community Forum to ask questions, swap stories, and share ideas, regardless of whether you work on public or private projects.

Explore the Community Forum

Screenshot of the GitHun Community Forum

You’re already on GitHub, contributing your skills and collaborating on code. With the Community Forum, you can also use GitHub to:

  • Learn from and support a community of 24 million developers. Tap into the collective knowledge of the world’s largest developer community—and get help from GitHub staff, too.
  • Find the answers you need when you need them. Search for information across all conversations in the Community Forum.
  • Browse tips and tricks for working better. We’ll share how-to articles on everything from cloning a repository to managing an open source community.
  • Get recognized for your contributions and expertise. Your help is important! The more you participate, the higher your rank will be.

Best of all, we’re just getting started. Head over to github.community to write your first post, contribute to the conversation, and let us know what you think! With your feedback, we can keep growing the Community Forum in meaningful ways and release even more features in 2018.

The conversation’s already started. We hope you’ll join in!

Introducing GitHub Marketplace free trials

Try featured Marketplace apps free for 14 days

In May, we launched GitHub Marketplace—a new way to discover and purchase tools that build on your development process, from continuous integration to project management and code review. Now it’s even easier to perfect your workflow by trying featured Marketplace apps for free.

See all featured apps

Adding tools to your development process isn’t always as easy as it seems. With the launch of free trials, you can try apps in Marketplace free for 14 days to make sure you choose the right tools for your team. Get an idea of how an app can help you work better, or see how it fits into your workflow.

Marketplace is made up of dozens of integrations that work seamlessly with GitHub—and that number is growing every month. With free trials, your team can get started with new tools, refine your process, experiment with developer tools, and find ways to work better, together.

Browse Marketplace