GitHub is Hiring

This position has been filled. See GitHub Support, and thanks for the interest!

Profitable Programmer: The Encore

The Profitable Programmer panel went well but was too packed. So we’re gonna do it again.

If you missed the first one, be sure to stop by Room D 138-139 on Level 1 Sunday at 1:50PM. The panel will feature all three GitHub developers as well as the inimitable Geoffrey Grosenbach and the prolific Ben Curtis.

Git over Bonjour

Chad Fowler and friends busted out the amazing gitjour this weekend at RailsConf. It’s a simple RubyGem which lets you serve and clone git repositories over Apple’s Bonjour. I’m at CabooseConf and just used it to clone embedded_actions.

$ gitjour list
Gathering for up to 5 seconds...
facebox/ on nyx.local.: gitjour clone facebox/
  a git project

Sweet.

RailsConf Git Talk

If you didn’t catch Scott’s awesome Git talk at Railsconf today, you missed out. Luckily he’s posted his slides at http://www.gitcasts.com/git-talk.

GitHub Textmate Theme!

This is most excellent. Just last night PJ asked for a GitHub TextMate theme on Twitter. Scott Becker answered the call: GitHub Theme for TextMate. Should go great with the GitHub TextMate bundle.

Grab it and go: sbecker/github_textmate_theme

GitHub at RailsConf

RailsConf 2008 (and CabooseConf) is about to begin. If you’re heading to Portland, say hi. We’ll have t-shirts and stickers, as well as a big banner in the Engine Yard booth.

Here are the talks GitHubbers will be giving:

The Profitable Programmer – 2:50pm on Friday. This is a panel featuring all three GitHub developers as well as the inimitable Geoffrey Grosenbach and the prolific Ben Curtis.

The Launch: Dos and Don’ts of Real Life Deploys – 4:25pm on Friday. Right after the Profitable Programmer talk, in the same room, come see Chris (that’s me!) talk about lessons learned launching a Rails site. I’ll tell some disaster stories, share useful plugins and techniques, and go over GitHub’s architecture.

Build Your Own Distributed, Self-Configuring Rails Cluster – 1:50pm on Saturday. See Tom and KirinDave talk about Fuzed, their nutty Erlang library for intelligently scaling Rails instances to the moon (and beyond).

Using Git to Manage and Deploy Rails Apps – 10:45am on Saturday. While he isn’t a GitHub developer, Git genius Scott Chacon will be giving a talk that you can’t afford to miss. Even if you know Git, there is sure to be some valuable information here. (Scott wrote the Git Peepcode PDF, creates Gitcasts, and has a bunch of Git related projects hosted here.)

Got one of those new fangled iPhones? Here’s an ics of our talks: GitHub-RailsConf-2008.ics. See you there!

More Textmate Bundle Goodness

Dr Nic continues onward with his GitHub Textmate bundle.

The newest feature? Line commenting.

See it in action:


TextMate + GitHub – how to comment/discuss on a line via GitHub from Dr Nic on Vimeo.

Make sure to get it while it’s hot! And oh yeah, there’s a VIM plugin too.

Meet the Developers

Meet the three gentlemen responsible for all your favorite GitHub bugs and features.


PJ Hyett (pjhyett) is one of the two penmen behind popular Ruby and Rails tabloid rag Err the Blog. While not working on GitHub Gems, service integration, or making you rich, he loves rewriting critical parts of the GitHub infrastructure in bash. PJ co-created FamSpam and does not have an iPhone.


Tom Preston-Werner (mojombo) is the author of popular RubyGems Chronic, god, and our very own Grit. He’s also the creator of Gravatar, which sold to Automattic for, like, a bazillion dollars. Tom is in charge of GitHub’s UI and anything that needs rewriting in Erlang.


Chris Wanstrath (defunkt) is me. I like Javascript, brutalist architecture, and shabu-shabu.

Feel free to email any of us: firstname@logicalawesome.com.

What OS do you use?

Wait, don’t tell me. I already know.

Here’s the OS breakdown of GitHub visitors in the past month:

BTW, the #4 spot? iPhone.

GitHub Textmate Bundle!

Dr Nic has just announced the GitHub Textmate Bundle.

Check out a short video of the bundle in action, straight from the good Doctor’s blog:


TextMate and GitHub: Show the current file in GitHub from Dr Nic on Vimeo.

Got a SHA?

Just Google it and click “I’m Feeling Lucky”.

Our friend Google should take you right to the commit.

(Spotted on the refactotum tweeter.)

Friday Fun

Our favorite host, Engine Yard, snapped a picture of the GitHub hardware and I wanted to share:

Who likes a lot of blinking lights? I do! I do!

Git and GitHub on Windows

Kyle Cordes has written a guide on using Git (and GitHub) on Windows. It’s well written and covers everything from generating ssh keys to installing msysGit.

Check it out if you or someone you know runs the big W.

SSH Keys Generated on Debian/Ubuntu Compromised

A security warning posted on the Debian security list today warns that SSH keys generated on Debian based systems (including Ubuntu) have a highly predictable random number generator. This corroborates what we’ve been seeing here at GitHub.

Luciano Bello discovered that the random number generator in Debian’s
openssl package is predictable. This is caused by an incorrect
Debian-specific change to the openssl package (CVE-2008-0166). As a
result, cryptographic key material may be guessable.

This is a Debian-specific vulnerability which does not affect other
operating systems which are not based on Debian. However, other systems
can be indirectly affected if weak keys are imported into them.

It is strongly recommended that all cryptographic key material which has
been generated by OpenSSL versions starting with 0.9.8c-1 on Debian
systems is recreated from scratch. Furthermore, all DSA keys ever used
on affected Debian systems for signing or authentication purposes should
be considered compromised; the Digital Signature Algorithm relies on a
secret random value used during signature generation.

We STRONGLY recommend that you discontinue use of any keys generated under this configuration and update your GitHub keys after you’ve patched your Debian based system.

Our Open Source

A list of projects extracted and open sourced from GitHub can be found on the GitHub account. We’ve also forked all the projects we are using on the site. Meta, dude.