Skip to content
master
Go to file
Code

Latest commit

 

Git stats

Files

Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
Type
Name
Latest commit message
Commit time
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

README.md

Build Status Maven Central

WARNING: Since 2.0 Jersey client integration is developed in "bootique-jersey" project per this issue. This project is only for 1.x support.

bootique-jersey-client

Integrates JAX-RS-based HTTP client in Bootique with support for various types of server authentication (BASIC, OAuth2, etc.). Allows to configure multiple client runtime parameters, as well as define server URL endpoints. Implementation is built on top of Jersey and Grizzly connector.

Quick Start

Add the module to your Bootique app:

<dependency>
	<groupId>io.bootique.jersey.client</groupId>
	<artifactId>bootique-jersey-client</artifactId>
</dependency>

Or if you want HTTPS clients with health checks and metrics:

<dependency>
	<groupId>io.bootique.jersey.client</groupId>
	<artifactId>bootique-jersey-client-instrumented</artifactId>
</dependency>

Inject HttpClientFactory and create client instances:

@Inject
private HttpClientFactory clientFactory;

public void doSomething() {

    Client client = clientFactory.newClient();
    Response response = client
        .target("https://example.org")
        .request()
        .get();
} 

Configuring Connection Parameters

You can specify a number of runtime parameters for your HTTP clients via the app .yml (or any other Bootique configuration mechanism):

jerseyclient:
  followRedirects: true
  readTimeoutMs: 2000
  connectTimeoutMs: 2000
  asyncThreadPoolSize: 10

Mapping URL Targets

In the example above we injected HttpClientFactory (that produced instances of JAX RS Client), and hardcoded the endpoint URL in Java. Instead you can map multiple URLs in the .yml, assigning each URL a symbolic name and optionally providing URL-specific runtime parameters:

jerseyclient:
  targets:
    google:
      url: "https://google.com"
    bootique:
      url: "https://bootique.io"
      followRedirects: false

Now you can inject HttpTargets and acquire instances of WebTarget by name:

@Inject
private HttpTargets targets;

public void doSomething() {

    Response response = targets.newTarget("bootique").request().get();
}

This not only reduces the amount of code, but more importantly allows to manage your URLs (and their runtime parameters) via configuration. E.g. you might use a different URL between test and production environments without changing the code.

Using BASIC Authentication

If your server endpoint requires BASIC authentication, you can associate your Clients and WebTargets with a named auth configuration. One or more named configurations are setup like this:

jerseyclient:
  auth:
    myauth:
      type: basic
      username: myuser
      password: mypassword

When creating a client in the Java code you can reference auth name ("myauth"):

@Inject
private HttpClientFactory clientFactory;

public void doSomething() {

    Client client = clientFactory.newBuilder().auth("myauth").build();
    Response response = client
        .target("https://example.org")
        .request()
        .get();
} 

Or you can associate a target with it:

jerseyclient:
  ...
  targets:
    secret:
      url: "https://example.org"
      auth: myauth

Using OAuth2 Authentication

OAuth2 authentication is very similar to BASIC. In fact they are no different on the Java end. In YAML the type should be "oauth2", and an extra "tokenUrl" property is required. Here is an example auth for a Twitter client:

jerseyclient:
  auth:
    twitter:
      type: oauth2
      tokenUrl: https://api.twitter.com/oauth2/token
      username: sdfjkdferefxfkdsf
      password: Efcdsfdsflkurecdsfj 

About

An HTTP client integrated with Bootique, built on top of Jersey

Topics

Resources

License

Languages

You can’t perform that action at this time.