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Numpy "fancy indexing", conditional indices, iterators #8

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Twenkid opened this Issue Sep 2, 2018 · 55 comments

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Twenkid commented Sep 2, 2018

BTW, do you know about the numpy "fancy indexing" and conditional indices?
They are supposed to be more efficient than normal iteration and shorter, too.

p[p>0] = p*1.6

https://www.numpy.org/devdocs/reference/generated/numpy.where.html#numpy.where

numpy.where(condition[, x, y])
Return elements chosen from x or y depending on condition.

"If all the arrays are 1-D, where is equivalent to:

[xv if c else yv
for c, xv, yv in zip(condition, x, y)]"

np.where(x < y, x, 10 + y) # both x and 10+y are broadcast
array([[10, 0, 0, 0],
[10, 11, 1, 1],
[10, 11, 12, 2]])

...

putmask(a, mask, values) Changes elements of an array based on conditional and input values.

Examples

x = np.arange(6).reshape(2, 3)
np.putmask(x, x>2, x**2)
x
array([[ 0, 1, 2],
[ 9, 16, 25]])
If values is smaller than a it is repeated:

x = np.arange(5)
np.putmask(x, x>1, [-33, -44])
x
array([ 0, 1, -33, -44, -33])

...

A more complex one which sends functions as parameters:

class numpy.nditer[source]
Efficient multi-dimensional iterator object to iterate over arrays.

https://www.numpy.org/devdocs/reference/generated/numpy.nditer.html#numpy.nditer

...

https://www.numpy.org/devdocs/reference/routines.indexing.html

Of course, for more meaningful transformations, some kind of nesting of such "fancy" operations or lambda functions and perhaps different data layout would be required.

E.g. more parallel process of pattern competion in pre-allocated slots in numpy arrays, and then wrapping them up, rather than sequentially one by one and doing allocations of new variables for each call. Where that's algorithmically possible; it may require intermediate steps and transformations.

if norm: # derivatives are Dx-normalized before comp:

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A longer log with the second image:

http://twenkid.com/cog/fork.txt

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Twenkid commented Sep 6, 2018

A longer log with the second image:

http://twenkid.com/cog/fork.txt

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Sure I'm using PyCharm, but text is more compressed than screenshots. Of course I run it line by line also, but based on my 20+ years? longer experience than you, I know that it's useful to generate logs with the specific details wanted and to analyze them offline too, besides watching the code online (with all the clutter of the IDE).

i will run what I want and as I want.

That's the problem, the integers must be signed. It's not to convert floats.

I know it's not to convert floats, I said that "astype" is usually applied for floats, not for ints, because what you do so far is not changing anything - it's still uint8, as shown in the printout.

It should be:

import numpy as np

...

image = cv2.imread(path, 0).astype(np.int) #32 bit signed
or
image = cv2.imread(path, 0).astype(np.int16) #16 bit

np.int, not just int
https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-1.13.0/user/basics.types.html
...

Then:
if Channels > 1:
image = cv2.cvtColor(image,cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY)

How is it different from specifying 0 in:
image = cv2.imread(arguments['image'], 0).astype(int)

Ah, this is a special parameter - I use openCV but haven't needed this "magic number".
The explicit conversion is more clear and readable, also image.shape returns 3 elements in case of color and 2 in case of BW (bad API design, it had to return 0, not nothing).

This detail has to be marked in comments to avoid these confusions.

If you insist on always one hard coded image, you don't need to parse arguments.

capture_223_06092018_121207

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Twenkid commented Sep 6, 2018

Sure I'm using PyCharm, but text is more compressed than screenshots. Of course I run it line by line also, but based on my 20+ years? longer experience than you, I know that it's useful to generate logs with the specific details wanted and to analyze them offline too, besides watching the code online (with all the clutter of the IDE).

i will run what I want and as I want.

That's the problem, the integers must be signed. It's not to convert floats.

I know it's not to convert floats, I said that "astype" is usually applied for floats, not for ints, because what you do so far is not changing anything - it's still uint8, as shown in the printout.

It should be:

import numpy as np

...

image = cv2.imread(path, 0).astype(np.int) #32 bit signed
or
image = cv2.imread(path, 0).astype(np.int16) #16 bit

np.int, not just int
https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-1.13.0/user/basics.types.html
...

Then:
if Channels > 1:
image = cv2.cvtColor(image,cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY)

How is it different from specifying 0 in:
image = cv2.imread(arguments['image'], 0).astype(int)

Ah, this is a special parameter - I use openCV but haven't needed this "magic number".
The explicit conversion is more clear and readable, also image.shape returns 3 elements in case of color and 2 in case of BW (bad API design, it had to return 0, not nothing).

This detail has to be marked in comments to avoid these confusions.

If you insist on always one hard coded image, you don't need to parse arguments.

capture_223_06092018_121207

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This is how you understand things. By exploring and testing, not by following instructions.

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Twenkid commented Sep 7, 2018

This is how you understand things. By exploring and testing, not by following instructions.

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Not 20 years, 20 years more than you.

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Twenkid commented Sep 7, 2018

Not 20 years, 20 years more than you.

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On topic, the Because of this bug, frame_dblobs only initializes blobs, it doesn't
increment or terminate them. So, half of it never actually runs.
When debugging, run it line-by-line: breakpoint at line 257:
for y in range(1, Y)
It will give you out-of-range error at y == 10, not sure why but you don't
need to go that far. In PyCharm "Variables" tab, make sure to unfold all
variables of "dP" and "vP": the results of processing prior line

The shape of_fork_at the point of error is [] ( np.shape(pylist) ) (line numbers here don't match yours and are to show the order of execution within the file:


ln153 P[0] == _P[0]? 
ln156 FORK_:  [[]]
_FORK_:  [[]]
ln160: if _x > ix, _x,ix:, ln160 1065 1063
ln142 while _ix <= x: ln142  1063 1065
scan_P_
ln138 ix **1065** 
ln142 while _ix <= x: ln142  0 1541   #**_ix = 0**

**_ix** = _x - len(_P[6])... ln151  **1063** 1541 2
**_FORK_:  [[]]**
ln160: NOT if _x > ix: _fork_.shape ln163, (1, 0) [[]]

_ix = _x - len(_P[6])... ln151  1063 1541 2
_FORK_:  [[]]
ln160: NOT if _x > ix: _fork_.shape ln163, (1, 0) [[]]   ix = 1065 < _x = 1541

Thus  (if P[0] == _P[0]) is not hit

_fork_ is set in the if _buff_... block, thus there's something wrong with _buff_ or _P_

 D:\Py\charm\ca\CogAlg\fork3.txt (10 hits)
	Line 57: y,Y 274: 1 1200
	Line 58: y,Y 274: 2 1200
	Line 59: y,Y 274: 3 1200
	Line 60: y,Y 274: 4 1200
	Line 61: y,Y 274: 5 1200
	Line 1590: y,Y 274: 6 1200
	Line 3147: y,Y 274: 7 1200
	Line 4676: y,Y 274: 8 1200
	Line 6128: y,Y 274: 9 1200
	Line 7587: y,Y 274: 10 1200

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Twenkid commented Sep 7, 2018

On topic, the Because of this bug, frame_dblobs only initializes blobs, it doesn't
increment or terminate them. So, half of it never actually runs.
When debugging, run it line-by-line: breakpoint at line 257:
for y in range(1, Y)
It will give you out-of-range error at y == 10, not sure why but you don't
need to go that far. In PyCharm "Variables" tab, make sure to unfold all
variables of "dP" and "vP": the results of processing prior line

The shape of_fork_at the point of error is [] ( np.shape(pylist) ) (line numbers here don't match yours and are to show the order of execution within the file:


ln153 P[0] == _P[0]? 
ln156 FORK_:  [[]]
_FORK_:  [[]]
ln160: if _x > ix, _x,ix:, ln160 1065 1063
ln142 while _ix <= x: ln142  1063 1065
scan_P_
ln138 ix **1065** 
ln142 while _ix <= x: ln142  0 1541   #**_ix = 0**

**_ix** = _x - len(_P[6])... ln151  **1063** 1541 2
**_FORK_:  [[]]**
ln160: NOT if _x > ix: _fork_.shape ln163, (1, 0) [[]]

_ix = _x - len(_P[6])... ln151  1063 1541 2
_FORK_:  [[]]
ln160: NOT if _x > ix: _fork_.shape ln163, (1, 0) [[]]   ix = 1065 < _x = 1541

Thus  (if P[0] == _P[0]) is not hit

_fork_ is set in the if _buff_... block, thus there's something wrong with _buff_ or _P_

 D:\Py\charm\ca\CogAlg\fork3.txt (10 hits)
	Line 57: y,Y 274: 1 1200
	Line 58: y,Y 274: 2 1200
	Line 59: y,Y 274: 3 1200
	Line 60: y,Y 274: 4 1200
	Line 61: y,Y 274: 5 1200
	Line 1590: y,Y 274: 6 1200
	Line 3147: y,Y 274: 7 1200
	Line 4676: y,Y 274: 8 1200
	Line 6128: y,Y 274: 9 1200
	Line 7587: y,Y 274: 10 1200

@Twenkid Twenkid closed this Sep 7, 2018

@Twenkid Twenkid reopened this Sep 7, 2018

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What do you mean by error? This is just one instance?

The program tries to read from an empty list and it interrupts the program. Well, yes - you could set assertions and avoid that - like checking the shape of the list.

You could also add try-except blocks and catch such cases which you expect (or exceptions in general).

For example they may be collected in a list and presented all together after complete run (if it's possible to finish it with the mistakes) with the context of the error, the other variables, so we could see many cases where the same exception occurs and see better the big picture, together with the coordinates of/on the actual input. We can spot the coordinates visually on the image, such as high contrast compared to the average etc.

At the assertion points, data/patterns could be fed where they were supposed to go with sample values of empty patterns or the previous pattern or - you understand better.

And/or the iteration just could be skipped, however without shutting down the whole program. That way a longer statistics could be collected.

_fork_ and _fork_[0][0][5] # blob _fork_ and _fork roots
Do you see which one is out of range?

Well, the interrupt (error) in my run and log was because_fork_was an empty list ([] and shape is 0), but code is trying to read [0][0][5] - thus both are out of range, the _fork_[0][0][5] doesn't exist, neither _fork_[0] etc.

When "while *ix <= x" terminates? Why is that an error?*

The termination is when it's False and the else is executed (the end of the log above)?

I'll check it and watch it with the context later with an environment, now just typing.

Could you direct me what's the expected answer for "when" - what features/values/lenghts or you just mean the coordinates of the current pixel x,y?

...

BTW, since you compare to filters, I assume it matters what are the average and specific values of the pixels when converted to BW and how they compare to your "magic numbers", thus they may impact the points of the bugs.

Since the patterns are built from the input, the local contrast etc. also guides the process.
So in my runs I may add some display.

...

One more thing, since dblobs is a self-containing module:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

The global code would go in that function.

Then when doing import ... no unwanted code will be executed and the governing (or debugging) module would avoid the command line or automatic loading.

PS. As of code breaking - sorry, you're right I'd better not pull in your master branch, but just give suggestions aside. You take or try them if you wish.

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Twenkid commented Sep 8, 2018

What do you mean by error? This is just one instance?

The program tries to read from an empty list and it interrupts the program. Well, yes - you could set assertions and avoid that - like checking the shape of the list.

You could also add try-except blocks and catch such cases which you expect (or exceptions in general).

For example they may be collected in a list and presented all together after complete run (if it's possible to finish it with the mistakes) with the context of the error, the other variables, so we could see many cases where the same exception occurs and see better the big picture, together with the coordinates of/on the actual input. We can spot the coordinates visually on the image, such as high contrast compared to the average etc.

At the assertion points, data/patterns could be fed where they were supposed to go with sample values of empty patterns or the previous pattern or - you understand better.

And/or the iteration just could be skipped, however without shutting down the whole program. That way a longer statistics could be collected.

_fork_ and _fork_[0][0][5] # blob _fork_ and _fork roots
Do you see which one is out of range?

Well, the interrupt (error) in my run and log was because_fork_was an empty list ([] and shape is 0), but code is trying to read [0][0][5] - thus both are out of range, the _fork_[0][0][5] doesn't exist, neither _fork_[0] etc.

When "while *ix <= x" terminates? Why is that an error?*

The termination is when it's False and the else is executed (the end of the log above)?

I'll check it and watch it with the context later with an environment, now just typing.

Could you direct me what's the expected answer for "when" - what features/values/lenghts or you just mean the coordinates of the current pixel x,y?

...

BTW, since you compare to filters, I assume it matters what are the average and specific values of the pixels when converted to BW and how they compare to your "magic numbers", thus they may impact the points of the bugs.

Since the patterns are built from the input, the local contrast etc. also guides the process.
So in my runs I may add some display.

...

One more thing, since dblobs is a self-containing module:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

The global code would go in that function.

Then when doing import ... no unwanted code will be executed and the governing (or debugging) module would avoid the command line or automatic loading.

PS. As of code breaking - sorry, you're right I'd better not pull in your master branch, but just give suggestions aside. You take or try them if you wish.

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When "while " terminates? Why is that an error?*

The termination is when it's False and the else is executed (the end of
the log above)?

This is a while loop, it should not execute unless _ix <= x

No, I meant the termination of the program due to the error, not of a pattern. :) I don't know about the patterns yet.


 if len(_fork_) == 1 and _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 and y > rng * 2 + 1 + 400 and
x < X - 300:  # margin set at 300: >len(fork_P[6])?

Why is it trying to read it, this is an AND expression, shouldn't prior NOT
len(fork) == 1 stop it?

I don't know, but it's not a good style to test the content of a data structure that can be NULL/None.

What about nesting:

if (len_fork_)==1:
  if  _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 and y > rng * 2 + 1 + 400 and x < X - 300:
     ...

Then it will skip the dangerous check.

If you want to check objects that can be None, then it's a good practice to embrace them with try-except block which would catch the exception gracefully.

BTW, since you compare to filters, I assume it matters what are the
average and specific values of the pixels when converted to BW and how they
compare to your "magic numbers", thus they may impact the points of the
bugs.

It shouldn't matter, patterns will have different shape, but the code
should run regardless.
And frame_dblobs doesn't even compute vPs.

Unless there are bugs...

Thanks, this is for running it outside PyCharm? Inside of it, I don't use
main() at all.

Inside or outside, it doesn't matter. That's for convenience, it's a normal function (unlike the C main).

Another module, say "test.py" would import it:

import frame_dblobs.py

Then it would call the functions externally with a data set, store the patterns etc.

If there's no such check, it will first execute the code in the global part of the module when importing it, which won't be desirable.

With the check, the module can be either run stand-alone or imported without that by-effect.

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Twenkid commented Sep 8, 2018

When "while " terminates? Why is that an error?*

The termination is when it's False and the else is executed (the end of
the log above)?

This is a while loop, it should not execute unless _ix <= x

No, I meant the termination of the program due to the error, not of a pattern. :) I don't know about the patterns yet.


 if len(_fork_) == 1 and _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 and y > rng * 2 + 1 + 400 and
x < X - 300:  # margin set at 300: >len(fork_P[6])?

Why is it trying to read it, this is an AND expression, shouldn't prior NOT
len(fork) == 1 stop it?

I don't know, but it's not a good style to test the content of a data structure that can be NULL/None.

What about nesting:

if (len_fork_)==1:
  if  _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 and y > rng * 2 + 1 + 400 and x < X - 300:
     ...

Then it will skip the dangerous check.

If you want to check objects that can be None, then it's a good practice to embrace them with try-except block which would catch the exception gracefully.

BTW, since you compare to filters, I assume it matters what are the
average and specific values of the pixels when converted to BW and how they
compare to your "magic numbers", thus they may impact the points of the
bugs.

It shouldn't matter, patterns will have different shape, but the code
should run regardless.
And frame_dblobs doesn't even compute vPs.

Unless there are bugs...

Thanks, this is for running it outside PyCharm? Inside of it, I don't use
main() at all.

Inside or outside, it doesn't matter. That's for convenience, it's a normal function (unlike the C main).

Another module, say "test.py" would import it:

import frame_dblobs.py

Then it would call the functions externally with a data set, store the patterns etc.

If there's no such check, it will first execute the code in the global part of the module when importing it, which won't be desirable.

With the check, the module can be either run stand-alone or imported without that by-effect.

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  • The nested if would require other adjustments to keep the logic of the else-s, for example like below:

Also the very long expressions are more readable if broken down. (For other developers and after not working constantly on it.) and that avoids accessing non-existing elements:


isEmpty =  len(_fork_) 
yLimitA = rng * 2 + 1
xLimitA = x < X - 99

yLimitB = y > rng * 2 + 1 + 400 
xLimitB = x < X - 300
forks =  False if isEmpty else _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 

if not isEmpty:
  if forks:
    if yLimitA and xLimitA:
     ...
    elif yLimitB and xLimitB:
      ...  

I don't know about you, but when my logic expressions grow too complex, e.g. for parsing, the usage of named variables improve readability and eases debugging.

(Further, the numbers could be upperBorder, lowerBorder etc., left, right etc., could be defined in the beginning of the module and more easily edited:

global upperBorder, leftBorder
upperBorder =400; leftBorder = 300

Also they could be edited by an external testing module.

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Twenkid commented Sep 9, 2018

  • The nested if would require other adjustments to keep the logic of the else-s, for example like below:

Also the very long expressions are more readable if broken down. (For other developers and after not working constantly on it.) and that avoids accessing non-existing elements:


isEmpty =  len(_fork_) 
yLimitA = rng * 2 + 1
xLimitA = x < X - 99

yLimitB = y > rng * 2 + 1 + 400 
xLimitB = x < X - 300
forks =  False if isEmpty else _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 

if not isEmpty:
  if forks:
    if yLimitA and xLimitA:
     ...
    elif yLimitB and xLimitB:
      ...  

I don't know about you, but when my logic expressions grow too complex, e.g. for parsing, the usage of named variables improve readability and eases debugging.

(Further, the numbers could be upperBorder, lowerBorder etc., left, right etc., could be defined in the beginning of the module and more easily edited:

global upperBorder, leftBorder
upperBorder =400; leftBorder = 300

Also they could be edited by an external testing module.

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I agree on the silliness.

Try-except may be generated automatically if they are needed at a large scal.

Your code could be as it is, it will be parsed (simply, just searching for IF ... or particular blocks, not complete analysis).

Debug and logging code will be added in a copy of your code and the copy would be executed.

So you could develop yours without the clutter, the test version will include additional stuff.

That could be assisted with so called annotations in the comments, e.g.:

if blah-blah:   # @{
  ...
                      # @ }

Meaning "surround with try-catch" or whatever needed.

The preprocessor would watch for line numbers etc. and would display them.

Yes, you could observe it online while debugging, but this may collect the wanted specific information and present it as wanted.

...

The exception scheme is (the simplest):

global errors
errors = []

try:
   if ...
except Exception as e: print(e); print("some local data and paramters"); errors.append(e)   

#should add more info about the exception

...

for e in errors: print(e)

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Twenkid commented Sep 9, 2018

I agree on the silliness.

Try-except may be generated automatically if they are needed at a large scal.

Your code could be as it is, it will be parsed (simply, just searching for IF ... or particular blocks, not complete analysis).

Debug and logging code will be added in a copy of your code and the copy would be executed.

So you could develop yours without the clutter, the test version will include additional stuff.

That could be assisted with so called annotations in the comments, e.g.:

if blah-blah:   # @{
  ...
                      # @ }

Meaning "surround with try-catch" or whatever needed.

The preprocessor would watch for line numbers etc. and would display them.

Yes, you could observe it online while debugging, but this may collect the wanted specific information and present it as wanted.

...

The exception scheme is (the simplest):

global errors
errors = []

try:
   if ...
except Exception as e: print(e); print("some local data and paramters"); errors.append(e)   

#should add more info about the exception

...

for e in errors: print(e)

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There you are one report, see below (a long printout). Out of range: 307 times on a run with the raccoon, with the older version (sorry, I'll load the newer ones later, I wanted to test the principle).

One obvious discovery is that the out of range comes near the end of the lines or at the very end (1023). The leftmost is at 976.

Note that the try-except block had to embrace below, because blob is defined in the failing IF block, so if the try-except is only for this one, the following blocks fail with using an undefined variable blob.

So blob etc. have to be set with some default values, you know which ones, or as below - the code below is also skipped when there's an exception.

I don't know if that affects the following lines and the errors.

...

global errors, dbg
errors = []
dbg = False

...

def scan_P(...):

    ...
    
    if _x > ix:  # x overlap between _P and next P: _P is buffered for next scan_P_, else included in blob:
        if (dbg): print("ln160: if _x > ix, _x,ix:, ln160", _x,ix)
        buff_.append((_P, _x, _fork_, root_))
    else:
        if (dbg): print("ln160: NOT if _x > ix: _fork_.shape ln163,", np.shape(_fork_), _fork_)
        try:
          if len(_fork_) == 1 and _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 and y > rng * 2 + 1 and x < X - 99:  # no fork blob if x < X - len(fork_P[6])?
            if (dbg): print("ln166 len(_fork_)==1 and...np.shape ... ln166", np.shape(_fork_), _fork_)

            # if blob _fork_ == 1 and _fork roots == 1, always > 0: a bug probably appends fork_ outside scan_P_?
            blob = form_blob(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # y-2 _P is packed in y-3 _fork_[0] blob +__fork_
          else:
            ave_x = _x - len(_P[6]) / 2  # average x of P: always integer?
            blob = _P, [_P], ave_x, 0, _fork_, len(root_)  # blob init, Dx = 0, no new _fork_ for continued blob


          if len(root_) == 0:  # never happens, probably due to the same bug
              net = blob, [blob]  # first-level net is initialized with terminated blob, no root_ to rebind
              if len(_fork_) == 0:
                  frame = term_network(net, frame)  # all root-mediated forks terminated, net is packed into frame
              else:
                  net, frame = term_blob(net, _fork_, frame)  # recursive root network termination test
          else:
              while root_:  # no root_ in blob: no rebinding to net at roots == 0
                  root_fork = root_.pop()  # ref to referring fork, verify?
                  root_fork.append(blob)  # fork binding, no convert to tuple: forms a new object?
        except Exception as e:
            print(e); errors.append(e);
            #print("x, P, P_, _buff_, _P_");
            print(str(x)); 

I tried to print also more local information - P, P_, _buff_, _P_ but it happened to be too much, it's unmanageable at this detail for now.

The time that Python spends to traverse to print is too much. I may try with Pickle some time (binary copies, so maybe less/faster traversals).

Exceptions: 307
list index out of range

(768, 1024)
y,Y 274: 1 768
y,Y 274: 2 768
y,Y 274: 3 768
y,Y 274: 4 768
y,Y 274: 5 768
y,Y 274: 6 768
y,Y 274: 7 768
y,Y 274: 8 768
y,Y 274: 9 768
y,Y 274: 10 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 11 768
y,Y 274: 12 768
y,Y 274: 13 768
y,Y 274: 14 768
y,Y 274: 15 768
list index out of range

1019
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 16 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 17 768
y,Y 274: 18 768
y,Y 274: 19 768
y,Y 274: 20 768
y,Y 274: 21 768
list index out of range

987
list index out of range

987
y,Y 274: 22 768
list index out of range

987
list index out of range

990
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 23 768
y,Y 274: 24 768
list index out of range

997
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 25 768
list index out of range

1008
y,Y 274: 26 768
y,Y 274: 27 768
y,Y 274: 28 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 29 768
y,Y 274: 30 768
y,Y 274: 31 768
y,Y 274: 32 768
y,Y 274: 33 768
y,Y 274: 34 768
y,Y 274: 35 768
y,Y 274: 36 768
y,Y 274: 37 768
list index out of range

1008
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 38 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 39 768
y,Y 274: 40 768
y,Y 274: 41 768
y,Y 274: 42 768
y,Y 274: 43 768
y,Y 274: 44 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 45 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 46 768
y,Y 274: 47 768
y,Y 274: 48 768
y,Y 274: 49 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 50 768
y,Y 274: 51 768
y,Y 274: 52 768
y,Y 274: 53 768
list index out of range

1000
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 54 768
list index out of range

1005
list index out of range

1005
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 55 768
list index out of range

1001
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 56 768
y,Y 274: 57 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 58 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 59 768
y,Y 274: 60 768
y,Y 274: 61 768
y,Y 274: 62 768
y,Y 274: 63 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 64 768
y,Y 274: 65 768
y,Y 274: 66 768
y,Y 274: 67 768
y,Y 274: 68 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 69 768
y,Y 274: 70 768
y,Y 274: 71 768
y,Y 274: 72 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 73 768
y,Y 274: 74 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 75 768
y,Y 274: 76 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 77 768
y,Y 274: 78 768
y,Y 274: 79 768
y,Y 274: 80 768
y,Y 274: 81 768
y,Y 274: 82 768
y,Y 274: 83 768
y,Y 274: 84 768
list index out of range

995
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 85 768
y,Y 274: 86 768
y,Y 274: 87 768
y,Y 274: 88 768
list index out of range

1008
list index out of range

1011
y,Y 274: 89 768
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 90 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 91 768
y,Y 274: 92 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 93 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 94 768
y,Y 274: 95 768
y,Y 274: 96 768
y,Y 274: 97 768
y,Y 274: 98 768
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 99 768
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 100 768
y,Y 274: 101 768
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 102 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 103 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 104 768
y,Y 274: 105 768
list index out of range

1007
y,Y 274: 106 768
y,Y 274: 107 768
y,Y 274: 108 768
y,Y 274: 109 768
y,Y 274: 110 768
list index out of range

1000
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 111 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 112 768
y,Y 274: 113 768
y,Y 274: 114 768
y,Y 274: 115 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 116 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 117 768
y,Y 274: 118 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 119 768
y,Y 274: 120 768
y,Y 274: 121 768
y,Y 274: 122 768
y,Y 274: 123 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 124 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 125 768
y,Y 274: 126 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 127 768
y,Y 274: 128 768
y,Y 274: 129 768
y,Y 274: 130 768
y,Y 274: 131 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 132 768
y,Y 274: 133 768
y,Y 274: 134 768
y,Y 274: 135 768
y,Y 274: 136 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 137 768
y,Y 274: 138 768
y,Y 274: 139 768
y,Y 274: 140 768
y,Y 274: 141 768
y,Y 274: 142 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 143 768
y,Y 274: 144 768
y,Y 274: 145 768
y,Y 274: 146 768
list index out of range

993
y,Y 274: 147 768
list index out of range

995
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1011
y,Y 274: 148 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 149 768
y,Y 274: 150 768
y,Y 274: 151 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 152 768
y,Y 274: 153 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 154 768
y,Y 274: 155 768
y,Y 274: 156 768
y,Y 274: 157 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 158 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 159 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 160 768
list index out of range

1019
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 161 768
y,Y 274: 162 768
y,Y 274: 163 768
y,Y 274: 164 768
y,Y 274: 165 768
y,Y 274: 166 768
y,Y 274: 167 768
y,Y 274: 168 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 169 768
y,Y 274: 170 768
y,Y 274: 171 768
y,Y 274: 172 768
list index out of range

991
list index out of range

1001
y,Y 274: 173 768
list index out of range

976
list index out of range

1002
list index out of range

1003
y,Y 274: 174 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 175 768
y,Y 274: 176 768
y,Y 274: 177 768
y,Y 274: 178 768
y,Y 274: 179 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 180 768
y,Y 274: 181 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 182 768
y,Y 274: 183 768
y,Y 274: 184 768
y,Y 274: 185 768
y,Y 274: 186 768
y,Y 274: 187 768
y,Y 274: 188 768
y,Y 274: 189 768
y,Y 274: 190 768
y,Y 274: 191 768
y,Y 274: 192 768
y,Y 274: 193 768
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 194 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 195 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 196 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 197 768
y,Y 274: 198 768
y,Y 274: 199 768
y,Y 274: 200 768
y,Y 274: 201 768
y,Y 274: 202 768
y,Y 274: 203 768
y,Y 274: 204 768
y,Y 274: 205 768
y,Y 274: 206 768
y,Y 274: 207 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 208 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 209 768
y,Y 274: 210 768
y,Y 274: 211 768
y,Y 274: 212 768
y,Y 274: 213 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 214 768
y,Y 274: 215 768
y,Y 274: 216 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 217 768
y,Y 274: 218 768
y,Y 274: 219 768
y,Y 274: 220 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 221 768
y,Y 274: 222 768
y,Y 274: 223 768
y,Y 274: 224 768
y,Y 274: 225 768
y,Y 274: 226 768
y,Y 274: 227 768
list index out of range

1006
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 228 768
y,Y 274: 229 768
y,Y 274: 230 768
y,Y 274: 231 768
y,Y 274: 232 768
y,Y 274: 233 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 234 768
y,Y 274: 235 768
y,Y 274: 236 768
y,Y 274: 237 768
y,Y 274: 238 768
y,Y 274: 239 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 240 768
y,Y 274: 241 768
y,Y 274: 242 768
y,Y 274: 243 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 244 768
y,Y 274: 245 768
y,Y 274: 246 768
y,Y 274: 247 768
y,Y 274: 248 768
y,Y 274: 249 768
y,Y 274: 250 768
y,Y 274: 251 768
y,Y 274: 252 768
y,Y 274: 253 768
y,Y 274: 254 768
y,Y 274: 255 768
y,Y 274: 256 768
y,Y 274: 257 768
y,Y 274: 258 768
y,Y 274: 259 768
y,Y 274: 260 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 261 768
y,Y 274: 262 768
y,Y 274: 263 768
y,Y 274: 264 768
y,Y 274: 265 768
y,Y 274: 266 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 267 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 268 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 269 768
y,Y 274: 270 768
y,Y 274: 271 768
y,Y 274: 272 768
y,Y 274: 273 768
y,Y 274: 274 768
y,Y 274: 275 768
y,Y 274: 276 768
list index out of range

1006
y,Y 274: 277 768
list index out of range

1002
y,Y 274: 278 768
list index out of range

1003
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 279 768
y,Y 274: 280 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 281 768
y,Y 274: 282 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 283 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 284 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 285 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 286 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 287 768
y,Y 274: 288 768
y,Y 274: 289 768
y,Y 274: 290 768
y,Y 274: 291 768
list index out of range

1006
y,Y 274: 292 768
list index out of range

994
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 293 768
list index out of range

1001
y,Y 274: 294 768
y,Y 274: 295 768
y,Y 274: 296 768
y,Y 274: 297 768
y,Y 274: 298 768
list index out of range

1006
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 299 768
list index out of range

987
y,Y 274: 300 768
y,Y 274: 301 768
y,Y 274: 302 768
y,Y 274: 303 768
y,Y 274: 304 768
y,Y 274: 305 768
y,Y 274: 306 768
y,Y 274: 307 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 308 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 309 768
y,Y 274: 310 768
y,Y 274: 311 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 312 768
y,Y 274: 313 768
y,Y 274: 314 768
y,Y 274: 315 768
y,Y 274: 316 768
y,Y 274: 317 768
y,Y 274: 318 768
y,Y 274: 319 768
y,Y 274: 320 768
y,Y 274: 321 768
y,Y 274: 322 768
y,Y 274: 323 768
y,Y 274: 324 768
y,Y 274: 325 768
y,Y 274: 326 768
y,Y 274: 327 768
y,Y 274: 328 768
y,Y 274: 329 768
y,Y 274: 330 768
y,Y 274: 331 768
y,Y 274: 332 768
y,Y 274: 333 768
y,Y 274: 334 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 335 768
y,Y 274: 336 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 337 768
list index out of range

1014
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 338 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 339 768
y,Y 274: 340 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 341 768
y,Y 274: 342 768
y,Y 274: 343 768
list index out of range

1008
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 344 768
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 345 768
y,Y 274: 346 768
y,Y 274: 347 768
list index out of range

1008
y,Y 274: 348 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 349 768
y,Y 274: 350 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 351 768
y,Y 274: 352 768
y,Y 274: 353 768
y,Y 274: 354 768
y,Y 274: 355 768
y,Y 274: 356 768
y,Y 274: 357 768
y,Y 274: 358 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 359 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 360 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 361 768
y,Y 274: 362 768
y,Y 274: 363 768
y,Y 274: 364 768
y,Y 274: 365 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 366 768
y,Y 274: 367 768
y,Y 274: 368 768
y,Y 274: 369 768
y,Y 274: 370 768
y,Y 274: 371 768
y,Y 274: 372 768
y,Y 274: 373 768
y,Y 274: 374 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 375 768
y,Y 274: 376 768
y,Y 274: 377 768
y,Y 274: 378 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 379 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 380 768
y,Y 274: 381 768
list index out of range

1023
list index out of range

1023
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 382 768
y,Y 274: 383 768
y,Y 274: 384 768
y,Y 274: 385 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 386 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 387 768
y,Y 274: 388 768
y,Y 274: 389 768
y,Y 274: 390 768
y,Y 274: 391 768
y,Y 274: 392 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 393 768
list index out of range

1014
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 394 768
y,Y 274: 395 768
y,Y 274: 396 768
y,Y 274: 397 768
y,Y 274: 398 768
y,Y 274: 399 768
y,Y 274: 400 768
y,Y 274: 401 768
y,Y 274: 402 768
y,Y 274: 403 768
y,Y 274: 404 768
y,Y 274: 405 768
y,Y 274: 406 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 407 768
list index out of range

1005
y,Y 274: 408 768
y,Y 274: 409 768
y,Y 274: 410 768
y,Y 274: 411 768
y,Y 274: 412 768
y,Y 274: 413 768
y,Y 274: 414 768
y,Y 274: 415 768
y,Y 274: 416 768
y,Y 274: 417 768
y,Y 274: 418 768
y,Y 274: 419 768
y,Y 274: 420 768
y,Y 274: 421 768
y,Y 274: 422 768
y,Y 274: 423 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 424 768
list index out of range

1012
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 425 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 426 768
y,Y 274: 427 768
y,Y 274: 428 768
y,Y 274: 429 768
y,Y 274: 430 768
y,Y 274: 431 768
list index out of range

1005
y,Y 274: 432 768
y,Y 274: 433 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 434 768
y,Y 274: 435 768
y,Y 274: 436 768
y,Y 274: 437 768
y,Y 274: 438 768
list index out of range

1008
y,Y 274: 439 768
y,Y 274: 440 768
y,Y 274: 441 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 442 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 443 768
y,Y 274: 444 768
y,Y 274: 445 768
y,Y 274: 446 768
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 447 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 448 768
list index out of range

1013
list index out of range

1013
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 449 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 450 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 451 768
y,Y 274: 452 768
y,Y 274: 453 768
y,Y 274: 454 768
y,Y 274: 455 768
y,Y 274: 456 768
y,Y 274: 457 768
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 458 768
y,Y 274: 459 768
y,Y 274: 460 768
y,Y 274: 461 768
y,Y 274: 462 768
y,Y 274: 463 768
y,Y 274: 464 768
y,Y 274: 465 768
list index out of range

1002
list index out of range

1005
y,Y 274: 466 768
y,Y 274: 467 768
y,Y 274: 468 768
y,Y 274: 469 768
y,Y 274: 470 768
y,Y 274: 471 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 472 768
list index out of range

1007
y,Y 274: 473 768
y,Y 274: 474 768
y,Y 274: 475 768
list index out of range

1007
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 476 768
y,Y 274: 477 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 478 768
y,Y 274: 479 768
y,Y 274: 480 768
y,Y 274: 481 768
y,Y 274: 482 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 483 768
y,Y 274: 484 768
y,Y 274: 485 768
list index out of range

1020
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 486 768
y,Y 274: 487 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 488 768
y,Y 274: 489 768
y,Y 274: 490 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 491 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 492 768
y,Y 274: 493 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 494 768
y,Y 274: 495 768
y,Y 274: 496 768
y,Y 274: 497 768
y,Y 274: 498 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 499 768
y,Y 274: 500 768
y,Y 274: 501 768
y,Y 274: 502 768
y,Y 274: 503 768
y,Y 274: 504 768
y,Y 274: 505 768
y,Y 274: 506 768
y,Y 274: 507 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 508 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 509 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 510 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 511 768
y,Y 274: 512 768
y,Y 274: 513 768
y,Y 274: 514 768
y,Y 274: 515 768
y,Y 274: 516 768
y,Y 274: 517 768
y,Y 274: 518 768
y,Y 274: 519 768
y,Y 274: 520 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 521 768
list index out of range

1009
y,Y 274: 522 768
y,Y 274: 523 768
y,Y 274: 524 768
y,Y 274: 525 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 526 768
y,Y 274: 527 768
y,Y 274: 528 768
y,Y 274: 529 768
y,Y 274: 530 768
y,Y 274: 531 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 532 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 533 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 534 768
y,Y 274: 535 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 536 768
y,Y 274: 537 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 538 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 539 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 540 768
list index out of range

1019
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 541 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 542 768
y,Y 274: 543 768
y,Y 274: 544 768
y,Y 274: 545 768
y,Y 274: 546 768
list index out of range

1007
y,Y 274: 547 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 548 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 549 768
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 550 768
y,Y 274: 551 768
y,Y 274: 552 768
y,Y 274: 553 768
y,Y 274: 554 768
y,Y 274: 555 768
y,Y 274: 556 768
y,Y 274: 557 768
y,Y 274: 558 768
y,Y 274: 559 768
y,Y 274: 560 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 561 768
y,Y 274: 562 768
y,Y 274: 563 768
list index out of range

983
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 564 768
y,Y 274: 565 768
list index out of range

1006
y,Y 274: 566 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 567 768
y,Y 274: 568 768
y,Y 274: 569 768
y,Y 274: 570 768
y,Y 274: 571 768
y,Y 274: 572 768
y,Y 274: 573 768
y,Y 274: 574 768
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 575 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 576 768
y,Y 274: 577 768
y,Y 274: 578 768
y,Y 274: 579 768
y,Y 274: 580 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 581 768
y,Y 274: 582 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 583 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 584 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 585 768
list index out of range

1012
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 586 768
y,Y 274: 587 768
y,Y 274: 588 768
y,Y 274: 589 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 590 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 591 768
y,Y 274: 592 768
y,Y 274: 593 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 594 768
y,Y 274: 595 768
y,Y 274: 596 768
y,Y 274: 597 768
y,Y 274: 598 768
y,Y 274: 599 768
y,Y 274: 600 768
y,Y 274: 601 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 602 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 603 768
y,Y 274: 604 768
y,Y 274: 605 768
y,Y 274: 606 768
y,Y 274: 607 768
y,Y 274: 608 768
y,Y 274: 609 768
y,Y 274: 610 768
y,Y 274: 611 768
y,Y 274: 612 768
list index out of range

992
list index out of range

995
list index out of range

1009
y,Y 274: 613 768
y,Y 274: 614 768
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 615 768
y,Y 274: 616 768
y,Y 274: 617 768
y,Y 274: 618 768
y,Y 274: 619 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 620 768
y,Y 274: 621 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 622 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 623 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 624 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 625 768
y,Y 274: 626 768
y,Y 274: 627 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 628 768
list index out of range

998
y,Y 274: 629 768
y,Y 274: 630 768
y,Y 274: 631 768
y,Y 274: 632 768
list index out of range

1012
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 633 768
y,Y 274: 634 768
y,Y 274: 635 768
y,Y 274: 636 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 637 768
y,Y 274: 638 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 639 768
y,Y 274: 640 768
y,Y 274: 641 768
y,Y 274: 642 768
y,Y 274: 643 768
list index out of range

1006
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 644 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 645 768
y,Y 274: 646 768
y,Y 274: 647 768
y,Y 274: 648 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 649 768
y,Y 274: 650 768
y,Y 274: 651 768
y,Y 274: 652 768
y,Y 274: 653 768
y,Y 274: 654 768
y,Y 274: 655 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 656 768
y,Y 274: 657 768
y,Y 274: 658 768
y,Y 274: 659 768
y,Y 274: 660 768
y,Y 274: 661 768
y,Y 274: 662 768
y,Y 274: 663 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 664 768
y,Y 274: 665 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 666 768
y,Y 274: 667 768
y,Y 274: 668 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 669 768
y,Y 274: 670 768
y,Y 274: 671 768
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 672 768
y,Y 274: 673 768
y,Y 274: 674 768
y,Y 274: 675 768
y,Y 274: 676 768
y,Y 274: 677 768
y,Y 274: 678 768
y,Y 274: 679 768
y,Y 274: 680 768
y,Y 274: 681 768
y,Y 274: 682 768
y,Y 274: 683 768
y,Y 274: 684 768
y,Y 274: 685 768
y,Y 274: 686 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 687 768
y,Y 274: 688 768
y,Y 274: 689 768
y,Y 274: 690 768
y,Y 274: 691 768
y,Y 274: 692 768
list index out of range

998
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 693 768
y,Y 274: 694 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 695 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 696 768
y,Y 274: 697 768
y,Y 274: 698 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 699 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 700 768
y,Y 274: 701 768
y,Y 274: 702 768
y,Y 274: 703 768
y,Y 274: 704 768
y,Y 274: 705 768
y,Y 274: 706 768
y,Y 274: 707 768
y,Y 274: 708 768
y,Y 274: 709 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 710 768
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 711 768
y,Y 274: 712 768
y,Y 274: 713 768
y,Y 274: 714 768
list index out of range

1003
y,Y 274: 715 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 716 768
y,Y 274: 717 768
list index out of range

1007
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 718 768
list index out of range

1013
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 719 768
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 720 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 721 768
y,Y 274: 722 768
y,Y 274: 723 768
y,Y 274: 724 768
y,Y 274: 725 768
y,Y 274: 726 768
y,Y 274: 727 768
y,Y 274: 728 768
y,Y 274: 729 768
y,Y 274: 730 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 731 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 732 768
y,Y 274: 733 768
y,Y 274: 734 768
y,Y 274: 735 768
y,Y 274: 736 768
y,Y 274: 737 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 738 768
y,Y 274: 739 768
y,Y 274: 740 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 741 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 742 768
y,Y 274: 743 768
y,Y 274: 744 768
y,Y 274: 745 768
y,Y 274: 746 768
y,Y 274: 747 768
y,Y 274: 748 768
y,Y 274: 749 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 750 768
y,Y 274: 751 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 752 768
y,Y 274: 753 768
y,Y 274: 754 768
y,Y 274: 755 768
y,Y 274: 756 768
y,Y 274: 757 768
y,Y 274: 758 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 759 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 760 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 761 768
list index out of range

1021
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 762 768
y,Y 274: 763 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 764 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 765 768
y,Y 274: 766 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 767 768
26.156800270080566
None

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 9, 2018

There you are one report, see below (a long printout). Out of range: 307 times on a run with the raccoon, with the older version (sorry, I'll load the newer ones later, I wanted to test the principle).

One obvious discovery is that the out of range comes near the end of the lines or at the very end (1023). The leftmost is at 976.

Note that the try-except block had to embrace below, because blob is defined in the failing IF block, so if the try-except is only for this one, the following blocks fail with using an undefined variable blob.

So blob etc. have to be set with some default values, you know which ones, or as below - the code below is also skipped when there's an exception.

I don't know if that affects the following lines and the errors.

...

global errors, dbg
errors = []
dbg = False

...

def scan_P(...):

    ...
    
    if _x > ix:  # x overlap between _P and next P: _P is buffered for next scan_P_, else included in blob:
        if (dbg): print("ln160: if _x > ix, _x,ix:, ln160", _x,ix)
        buff_.append((_P, _x, _fork_, root_))
    else:
        if (dbg): print("ln160: NOT if _x > ix: _fork_.shape ln163,", np.shape(_fork_), _fork_)
        try:
          if len(_fork_) == 1 and _fork_[0][0][5] == 1 and y > rng * 2 + 1 and x < X - 99:  # no fork blob if x < X - len(fork_P[6])?
            if (dbg): print("ln166 len(_fork_)==1 and...np.shape ... ln166", np.shape(_fork_), _fork_)

            # if blob _fork_ == 1 and _fork roots == 1, always > 0: a bug probably appends fork_ outside scan_P_?
            blob = form_blob(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # y-2 _P is packed in y-3 _fork_[0] blob +__fork_
          else:
            ave_x = _x - len(_P[6]) / 2  # average x of P: always integer?
            blob = _P, [_P], ave_x, 0, _fork_, len(root_)  # blob init, Dx = 0, no new _fork_ for continued blob


          if len(root_) == 0:  # never happens, probably due to the same bug
              net = blob, [blob]  # first-level net is initialized with terminated blob, no root_ to rebind
              if len(_fork_) == 0:
                  frame = term_network(net, frame)  # all root-mediated forks terminated, net is packed into frame
              else:
                  net, frame = term_blob(net, _fork_, frame)  # recursive root network termination test
          else:
              while root_:  # no root_ in blob: no rebinding to net at roots == 0
                  root_fork = root_.pop()  # ref to referring fork, verify?
                  root_fork.append(blob)  # fork binding, no convert to tuple: forms a new object?
        except Exception as e:
            print(e); errors.append(e);
            #print("x, P, P_, _buff_, _P_");
            print(str(x)); 

I tried to print also more local information - P, P_, _buff_, _P_ but it happened to be too much, it's unmanageable at this detail for now.

The time that Python spends to traverse to print is too much. I may try with Pickle some time (binary copies, so maybe less/faster traversals).

Exceptions: 307
list index out of range

(768, 1024)
y,Y 274: 1 768
y,Y 274: 2 768
y,Y 274: 3 768
y,Y 274: 4 768
y,Y 274: 5 768
y,Y 274: 6 768
y,Y 274: 7 768
y,Y 274: 8 768
y,Y 274: 9 768
y,Y 274: 10 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 11 768
y,Y 274: 12 768
y,Y 274: 13 768
y,Y 274: 14 768
y,Y 274: 15 768
list index out of range

1019
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 16 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 17 768
y,Y 274: 18 768
y,Y 274: 19 768
y,Y 274: 20 768
y,Y 274: 21 768
list index out of range

987
list index out of range

987
y,Y 274: 22 768
list index out of range

987
list index out of range

990
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 23 768
y,Y 274: 24 768
list index out of range

997
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 25 768
list index out of range

1008
y,Y 274: 26 768
y,Y 274: 27 768
y,Y 274: 28 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 29 768
y,Y 274: 30 768
y,Y 274: 31 768
y,Y 274: 32 768
y,Y 274: 33 768
y,Y 274: 34 768
y,Y 274: 35 768
y,Y 274: 36 768
y,Y 274: 37 768
list index out of range

1008
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 38 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 39 768
y,Y 274: 40 768
y,Y 274: 41 768
y,Y 274: 42 768
y,Y 274: 43 768
y,Y 274: 44 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 45 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 46 768
y,Y 274: 47 768
y,Y 274: 48 768
y,Y 274: 49 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 50 768
y,Y 274: 51 768
y,Y 274: 52 768
y,Y 274: 53 768
list index out of range

1000
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 54 768
list index out of range

1005
list index out of range

1005
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 55 768
list index out of range

1001
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 56 768
y,Y 274: 57 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 58 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 59 768
y,Y 274: 60 768
y,Y 274: 61 768
y,Y 274: 62 768
y,Y 274: 63 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 64 768
y,Y 274: 65 768
y,Y 274: 66 768
y,Y 274: 67 768
y,Y 274: 68 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 69 768
y,Y 274: 70 768
y,Y 274: 71 768
y,Y 274: 72 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 73 768
y,Y 274: 74 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 75 768
y,Y 274: 76 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 77 768
y,Y 274: 78 768
y,Y 274: 79 768
y,Y 274: 80 768
y,Y 274: 81 768
y,Y 274: 82 768
y,Y 274: 83 768
y,Y 274: 84 768
list index out of range

995
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 85 768
y,Y 274: 86 768
y,Y 274: 87 768
y,Y 274: 88 768
list index out of range

1008
list index out of range

1011
y,Y 274: 89 768
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 90 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 91 768
y,Y 274: 92 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 93 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 94 768
y,Y 274: 95 768
y,Y 274: 96 768
y,Y 274: 97 768
y,Y 274: 98 768
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 99 768
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 100 768
y,Y 274: 101 768
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 102 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 103 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 104 768
y,Y 274: 105 768
list index out of range

1007
y,Y 274: 106 768
y,Y 274: 107 768
y,Y 274: 108 768
y,Y 274: 109 768
y,Y 274: 110 768
list index out of range

1000
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 111 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 112 768
y,Y 274: 113 768
y,Y 274: 114 768
y,Y 274: 115 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 116 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 117 768
y,Y 274: 118 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 119 768
y,Y 274: 120 768
y,Y 274: 121 768
y,Y 274: 122 768
y,Y 274: 123 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 124 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 125 768
y,Y 274: 126 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 127 768
y,Y 274: 128 768
y,Y 274: 129 768
y,Y 274: 130 768
y,Y 274: 131 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 132 768
y,Y 274: 133 768
y,Y 274: 134 768
y,Y 274: 135 768
y,Y 274: 136 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 137 768
y,Y 274: 138 768
y,Y 274: 139 768
y,Y 274: 140 768
y,Y 274: 141 768
y,Y 274: 142 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 143 768
y,Y 274: 144 768
y,Y 274: 145 768
y,Y 274: 146 768
list index out of range

993
y,Y 274: 147 768
list index out of range

995
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1011
y,Y 274: 148 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 149 768
y,Y 274: 150 768
y,Y 274: 151 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 152 768
y,Y 274: 153 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 154 768
y,Y 274: 155 768
y,Y 274: 156 768
y,Y 274: 157 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 158 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 159 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 160 768
list index out of range

1019
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 161 768
y,Y 274: 162 768
y,Y 274: 163 768
y,Y 274: 164 768
y,Y 274: 165 768
y,Y 274: 166 768
y,Y 274: 167 768
y,Y 274: 168 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 169 768
y,Y 274: 170 768
y,Y 274: 171 768
y,Y 274: 172 768
list index out of range

991
list index out of range

1001
y,Y 274: 173 768
list index out of range

976
list index out of range

1002
list index out of range

1003
y,Y 274: 174 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 175 768
y,Y 274: 176 768
y,Y 274: 177 768
y,Y 274: 178 768
y,Y 274: 179 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 180 768
y,Y 274: 181 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 182 768
y,Y 274: 183 768
y,Y 274: 184 768
y,Y 274: 185 768
y,Y 274: 186 768
y,Y 274: 187 768
y,Y 274: 188 768
y,Y 274: 189 768
y,Y 274: 190 768
y,Y 274: 191 768
y,Y 274: 192 768
y,Y 274: 193 768
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 194 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 195 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 196 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 197 768
y,Y 274: 198 768
y,Y 274: 199 768
y,Y 274: 200 768
y,Y 274: 201 768
y,Y 274: 202 768
y,Y 274: 203 768
y,Y 274: 204 768
y,Y 274: 205 768
y,Y 274: 206 768
y,Y 274: 207 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 208 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 209 768
y,Y 274: 210 768
y,Y 274: 211 768
y,Y 274: 212 768
y,Y 274: 213 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 214 768
y,Y 274: 215 768
y,Y 274: 216 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 217 768
y,Y 274: 218 768
y,Y 274: 219 768
y,Y 274: 220 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 221 768
y,Y 274: 222 768
y,Y 274: 223 768
y,Y 274: 224 768
y,Y 274: 225 768
y,Y 274: 226 768
y,Y 274: 227 768
list index out of range

1006
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 228 768
y,Y 274: 229 768
y,Y 274: 230 768
y,Y 274: 231 768
y,Y 274: 232 768
y,Y 274: 233 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 234 768
y,Y 274: 235 768
y,Y 274: 236 768
y,Y 274: 237 768
y,Y 274: 238 768
y,Y 274: 239 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 240 768
y,Y 274: 241 768
y,Y 274: 242 768
y,Y 274: 243 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 244 768
y,Y 274: 245 768
y,Y 274: 246 768
y,Y 274: 247 768
y,Y 274: 248 768
y,Y 274: 249 768
y,Y 274: 250 768
y,Y 274: 251 768
y,Y 274: 252 768
y,Y 274: 253 768
y,Y 274: 254 768
y,Y 274: 255 768
y,Y 274: 256 768
y,Y 274: 257 768
y,Y 274: 258 768
y,Y 274: 259 768
y,Y 274: 260 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 261 768
y,Y 274: 262 768
y,Y 274: 263 768
y,Y 274: 264 768
y,Y 274: 265 768
y,Y 274: 266 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 267 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 268 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 269 768
y,Y 274: 270 768
y,Y 274: 271 768
y,Y 274: 272 768
y,Y 274: 273 768
y,Y 274: 274 768
y,Y 274: 275 768
y,Y 274: 276 768
list index out of range

1006
y,Y 274: 277 768
list index out of range

1002
y,Y 274: 278 768
list index out of range

1003
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 279 768
y,Y 274: 280 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 281 768
y,Y 274: 282 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 283 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 284 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 285 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 286 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 287 768
y,Y 274: 288 768
y,Y 274: 289 768
y,Y 274: 290 768
y,Y 274: 291 768
list index out of range

1006
y,Y 274: 292 768
list index out of range

994
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 293 768
list index out of range

1001
y,Y 274: 294 768
y,Y 274: 295 768
y,Y 274: 296 768
y,Y 274: 297 768
y,Y 274: 298 768
list index out of range

1006
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 299 768
list index out of range

987
y,Y 274: 300 768
y,Y 274: 301 768
y,Y 274: 302 768
y,Y 274: 303 768
y,Y 274: 304 768
y,Y 274: 305 768
y,Y 274: 306 768
y,Y 274: 307 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 308 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 309 768
y,Y 274: 310 768
y,Y 274: 311 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 312 768
y,Y 274: 313 768
y,Y 274: 314 768
y,Y 274: 315 768
y,Y 274: 316 768
y,Y 274: 317 768
y,Y 274: 318 768
y,Y 274: 319 768
y,Y 274: 320 768
y,Y 274: 321 768
y,Y 274: 322 768
y,Y 274: 323 768
y,Y 274: 324 768
y,Y 274: 325 768
y,Y 274: 326 768
y,Y 274: 327 768
y,Y 274: 328 768
y,Y 274: 329 768
y,Y 274: 330 768
y,Y 274: 331 768
y,Y 274: 332 768
y,Y 274: 333 768
y,Y 274: 334 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 335 768
y,Y 274: 336 768
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 337 768
list index out of range

1014
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 338 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 339 768
y,Y 274: 340 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 341 768
y,Y 274: 342 768
y,Y 274: 343 768
list index out of range

1008
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 344 768
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 345 768
y,Y 274: 346 768
y,Y 274: 347 768
list index out of range

1008
y,Y 274: 348 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 349 768
y,Y 274: 350 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 351 768
y,Y 274: 352 768
y,Y 274: 353 768
y,Y 274: 354 768
y,Y 274: 355 768
y,Y 274: 356 768
y,Y 274: 357 768
y,Y 274: 358 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 359 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 360 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 361 768
y,Y 274: 362 768
y,Y 274: 363 768
y,Y 274: 364 768
y,Y 274: 365 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 366 768
y,Y 274: 367 768
y,Y 274: 368 768
y,Y 274: 369 768
y,Y 274: 370 768
y,Y 274: 371 768
y,Y 274: 372 768
y,Y 274: 373 768
y,Y 274: 374 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 375 768
y,Y 274: 376 768
y,Y 274: 377 768
y,Y 274: 378 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 379 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 380 768
y,Y 274: 381 768
list index out of range

1023
list index out of range

1023
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 382 768
y,Y 274: 383 768
y,Y 274: 384 768
y,Y 274: 385 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 386 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 387 768
y,Y 274: 388 768
y,Y 274: 389 768
y,Y 274: 390 768
y,Y 274: 391 768
y,Y 274: 392 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 393 768
list index out of range

1014
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 394 768
y,Y 274: 395 768
y,Y 274: 396 768
y,Y 274: 397 768
y,Y 274: 398 768
y,Y 274: 399 768
y,Y 274: 400 768
y,Y 274: 401 768
y,Y 274: 402 768
y,Y 274: 403 768
y,Y 274: 404 768
y,Y 274: 405 768
y,Y 274: 406 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 407 768
list index out of range

1005
y,Y 274: 408 768
y,Y 274: 409 768
y,Y 274: 410 768
y,Y 274: 411 768
y,Y 274: 412 768
y,Y 274: 413 768
y,Y 274: 414 768
y,Y 274: 415 768
y,Y 274: 416 768
y,Y 274: 417 768
y,Y 274: 418 768
y,Y 274: 419 768
y,Y 274: 420 768
y,Y 274: 421 768
y,Y 274: 422 768
y,Y 274: 423 768
list index out of range

1016
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 424 768
list index out of range

1012
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 425 768
list index out of range

1017
y,Y 274: 426 768
y,Y 274: 427 768
y,Y 274: 428 768
y,Y 274: 429 768
y,Y 274: 430 768
y,Y 274: 431 768
list index out of range

1005
y,Y 274: 432 768
y,Y 274: 433 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 434 768
y,Y 274: 435 768
y,Y 274: 436 768
y,Y 274: 437 768
y,Y 274: 438 768
list index out of range

1008
y,Y 274: 439 768
y,Y 274: 440 768
y,Y 274: 441 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 442 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 443 768
y,Y 274: 444 768
y,Y 274: 445 768
y,Y 274: 446 768
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 447 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 448 768
list index out of range

1013
list index out of range

1013
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 449 768
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 450 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 451 768
y,Y 274: 452 768
y,Y 274: 453 768
y,Y 274: 454 768
y,Y 274: 455 768
y,Y 274: 456 768
y,Y 274: 457 768
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 458 768
y,Y 274: 459 768
y,Y 274: 460 768
y,Y 274: 461 768
y,Y 274: 462 768
y,Y 274: 463 768
y,Y 274: 464 768
y,Y 274: 465 768
list index out of range

1002
list index out of range

1005
y,Y 274: 466 768
y,Y 274: 467 768
y,Y 274: 468 768
y,Y 274: 469 768
y,Y 274: 470 768
y,Y 274: 471 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 472 768
list index out of range

1007
y,Y 274: 473 768
y,Y 274: 474 768
y,Y 274: 475 768
list index out of range

1007
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 476 768
y,Y 274: 477 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 478 768
y,Y 274: 479 768
y,Y 274: 480 768
y,Y 274: 481 768
y,Y 274: 482 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 483 768
y,Y 274: 484 768
y,Y 274: 485 768
list index out of range

1020
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 486 768
y,Y 274: 487 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 488 768
y,Y 274: 489 768
y,Y 274: 490 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 491 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 492 768
y,Y 274: 493 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 494 768
y,Y 274: 495 768
y,Y 274: 496 768
y,Y 274: 497 768
y,Y 274: 498 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 499 768
y,Y 274: 500 768
y,Y 274: 501 768
y,Y 274: 502 768
y,Y 274: 503 768
y,Y 274: 504 768
y,Y 274: 505 768
y,Y 274: 506 768
y,Y 274: 507 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 508 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 509 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 510 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 511 768
y,Y 274: 512 768
y,Y 274: 513 768
y,Y 274: 514 768
y,Y 274: 515 768
y,Y 274: 516 768
y,Y 274: 517 768
y,Y 274: 518 768
y,Y 274: 519 768
y,Y 274: 520 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 521 768
list index out of range

1009
y,Y 274: 522 768
y,Y 274: 523 768
y,Y 274: 524 768
y,Y 274: 525 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 526 768
y,Y 274: 527 768
y,Y 274: 528 768
y,Y 274: 529 768
y,Y 274: 530 768
y,Y 274: 531 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 532 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 533 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 534 768
y,Y 274: 535 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 536 768
y,Y 274: 537 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 538 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 539 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 540 768
list index out of range

1019
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 541 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 542 768
y,Y 274: 543 768
y,Y 274: 544 768
y,Y 274: 545 768
y,Y 274: 546 768
list index out of range

1007
y,Y 274: 547 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 548 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 549 768
list index out of range

1018
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 550 768
y,Y 274: 551 768
y,Y 274: 552 768
y,Y 274: 553 768
y,Y 274: 554 768
y,Y 274: 555 768
y,Y 274: 556 768
y,Y 274: 557 768
y,Y 274: 558 768
y,Y 274: 559 768
y,Y 274: 560 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 561 768
y,Y 274: 562 768
y,Y 274: 563 768
list index out of range

983
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 564 768
y,Y 274: 565 768
list index out of range

1006
y,Y 274: 566 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 567 768
y,Y 274: 568 768
y,Y 274: 569 768
y,Y 274: 570 768
y,Y 274: 571 768
y,Y 274: 572 768
y,Y 274: 573 768
y,Y 274: 574 768
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 575 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 576 768
y,Y 274: 577 768
y,Y 274: 578 768
y,Y 274: 579 768
y,Y 274: 580 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 581 768
y,Y 274: 582 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 583 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 584 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 585 768
list index out of range

1012
list index out of range

1017
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 586 768
y,Y 274: 587 768
y,Y 274: 588 768
y,Y 274: 589 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 590 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 591 768
y,Y 274: 592 768
y,Y 274: 593 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 594 768
y,Y 274: 595 768
y,Y 274: 596 768
y,Y 274: 597 768
y,Y 274: 598 768
y,Y 274: 599 768
y,Y 274: 600 768
y,Y 274: 601 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 602 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 603 768
y,Y 274: 604 768
y,Y 274: 605 768
y,Y 274: 606 768
y,Y 274: 607 768
y,Y 274: 608 768
y,Y 274: 609 768
y,Y 274: 610 768
y,Y 274: 611 768
y,Y 274: 612 768
list index out of range

992
list index out of range

995
list index out of range

1009
y,Y 274: 613 768
y,Y 274: 614 768
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 615 768
y,Y 274: 616 768
y,Y 274: 617 768
y,Y 274: 618 768
y,Y 274: 619 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 620 768
y,Y 274: 621 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 622 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 623 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 624 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 625 768
y,Y 274: 626 768
y,Y 274: 627 768
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 628 768
list index out of range

998
y,Y 274: 629 768
y,Y 274: 630 768
y,Y 274: 631 768
y,Y 274: 632 768
list index out of range

1012
list index out of range

1014
y,Y 274: 633 768
y,Y 274: 634 768
y,Y 274: 635 768
y,Y 274: 636 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 637 768
y,Y 274: 638 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 639 768
y,Y 274: 640 768
y,Y 274: 641 768
y,Y 274: 642 768
y,Y 274: 643 768
list index out of range

1006
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 644 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 645 768
y,Y 274: 646 768
y,Y 274: 647 768
y,Y 274: 648 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 649 768
y,Y 274: 650 768
y,Y 274: 651 768
y,Y 274: 652 768
y,Y 274: 653 768
y,Y 274: 654 768
y,Y 274: 655 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 656 768
y,Y 274: 657 768
y,Y 274: 658 768
y,Y 274: 659 768
y,Y 274: 660 768
y,Y 274: 661 768
y,Y 274: 662 768
y,Y 274: 663 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 664 768
y,Y 274: 665 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 666 768
y,Y 274: 667 768
y,Y 274: 668 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 669 768
y,Y 274: 670 768
y,Y 274: 671 768
list index out of range

1015
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 672 768
y,Y 274: 673 768
y,Y 274: 674 768
y,Y 274: 675 768
y,Y 274: 676 768
y,Y 274: 677 768
y,Y 274: 678 768
y,Y 274: 679 768
y,Y 274: 680 768
y,Y 274: 681 768
y,Y 274: 682 768
y,Y 274: 683 768
y,Y 274: 684 768
y,Y 274: 685 768
y,Y 274: 686 768
list index out of range

1022
y,Y 274: 687 768
y,Y 274: 688 768
y,Y 274: 689 768
y,Y 274: 690 768
y,Y 274: 691 768
y,Y 274: 692 768
list index out of range

998
list index out of range

1000
y,Y 274: 693 768
y,Y 274: 694 768
list index out of range

1020
y,Y 274: 695 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 696 768
y,Y 274: 697 768
y,Y 274: 698 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 699 768
list index out of range

1012
y,Y 274: 700 768
y,Y 274: 701 768
y,Y 274: 702 768
y,Y 274: 703 768
y,Y 274: 704 768
y,Y 274: 705 768
y,Y 274: 706 768
y,Y 274: 707 768
y,Y 274: 708 768
y,Y 274: 709 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 710 768
list index out of range

1010
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 711 768
y,Y 274: 712 768
y,Y 274: 713 768
y,Y 274: 714 768
list index out of range

1003
y,Y 274: 715 768
list index out of range

1010
y,Y 274: 716 768
y,Y 274: 717 768
list index out of range

1007
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 718 768
list index out of range

1013
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 719 768
list index out of range

1015
y,Y 274: 720 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 721 768
y,Y 274: 722 768
y,Y 274: 723 768
y,Y 274: 724 768
y,Y 274: 725 768
y,Y 274: 726 768
y,Y 274: 727 768
y,Y 274: 728 768
y,Y 274: 729 768
y,Y 274: 730 768
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 731 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 732 768
y,Y 274: 733 768
y,Y 274: 734 768
y,Y 274: 735 768
y,Y 274: 736 768
y,Y 274: 737 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 738 768
y,Y 274: 739 768
y,Y 274: 740 768
list index out of range

1013
y,Y 274: 741 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 742 768
y,Y 274: 743 768
y,Y 274: 744 768
y,Y 274: 745 768
y,Y 274: 746 768
y,Y 274: 747 768
y,Y 274: 748 768
y,Y 274: 749 768
list index out of range

1023
y,Y 274: 750 768
y,Y 274: 751 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 752 768
y,Y 274: 753 768
y,Y 274: 754 768
y,Y 274: 755 768
y,Y 274: 756 768
y,Y 274: 757 768
y,Y 274: 758 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 759 768
list index out of range

1019
y,Y 274: 760 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 761 768
list index out of range

1021
list index out of range

1021
y,Y 274: 762 768
y,Y 274: 763 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 764 768
list index out of range

1016
y,Y 274: 765 768
y,Y 274: 766 768
list index out of range

1018
y,Y 274: 767 768
26.156800270080566
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@boris-kz

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boris-kz commented Sep 10, 2018

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Twenkid Sep 10, 2018

Collaborator

But what really need is values of variables before an error, whatever the error is.
Pycharm is telling me that "variables are not available" You got them from np.shape(pylist)?
How does that work? Or Pickle, but I only need a few steps back, not the whole log? Some kind of running buffer?

I used simple printing. To get it as output, without saving to a file explicitly, it's just:

python dblobs.py > log.txt

The output of print would go there.

np.shape(list) returns just the shape of a general list.

Better than print is to save to a log-structure and to a file/to files explicitly with flags on/off.
The data overload could be partially solved by pausing the run or saving not all data, but just a limited amount of times during the run (if there still are many exceptions).

...

Yes, it could be a running buffer, like a stack, where the desired variables are stored and after certain amount of steps the oldest are removed.

When there's an error - print that buffer or collect these recent data for another log.

You could also print for every step, but pause the run when there's an error:

cv2.waitKey(0) #any key

or

blah = input("prompt") #waits for enter

...

BTW, maybe the most appropriate way is to use Python's reflection functions.

Some simple ones are:

globals() returns a dictionary of the global vars (global var....) - both names and values
locals() - the ones in the function/local running context

So they can be printed directly or more pretty by a simple iteration, not manually per variable.
They can also be changed, new variables added, the values changed by iterating this structure.

context = locals()
print(context)

wanted_vars = ['P', '_P', 'blob', 'ix', '_ix']  #whatever identifiers

for w in wanted_vars:
  print(context[w])

http://blog.lerner.co.il/four-ways-to-assign-variables-in-python/

...

I see there's a new more sophisticated module in Python 3.7:

https://docs.python.org/3/library/contextvars.html
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/50854974/context-variables-in-python
https://twitter.com/raymondh/status/959455137893793793

It's possible that Pycharm loses the variables due to those "thread leaching" explained in the twitter post.

We'll see, maybe locals()/globals() would be enough, though, I don't know.

...

I guess you don't know to rerun wrong cycles with altered data, but I imagine the following possible procedure, which I think is interesting and may be useful later.

So, the context would be copied in the beginning of a function, maybe just locals() would be enough, or also in the beginning or/and ending of each iteration, as long as the memory allows.

...

The function content would be nested within two other loops, though, in order to allow rerunning.


import contextvars #if needed
#locals, globals are built-in functions

def scan(....):
  # copy the local context or selected items  
  while initfunc:**
  ...  # immediately after the header
  ... # load the context from the copy - it could be changed from the exception block
      # init loop variables
    while processing: # embraces your processing loop
       while _ix <= x:  # the actual loop
         if (not processing): break 
         #or at the end of the cycle, after the exception handling t

       try: 
       ...
       except ... : 
          # print the local context
          # copy the old context, change some of the variables if desirable
          processing = False
          continue   # in general, when using continue in a while loop, it's important not to forget to check whether the counters/logic is updated in the alternative branches, in order to avoid endless loops          
      ...

        #end of while _ix<...     

When there's an exception, you could log, dump etc., but also revert the values to the copied ones, change some and rerun the current loop/the function with the changed values*.

If everything is OK, "processing" flag would be set to True and the cycle would end when ix<... finishes.

In the exception block, it would be set to False, then checked and the processing loop - thus interrupted.

Then control goes back to the upper loop, the local variables/parameters are reset.

The context could be saved on each cycle in a running round-robin buffer.

...

That changing of values could go also for adjusting some border cases in experimental comparisons, like these y < ... x < ... In case of an error, several combinations could be checked automatically (or by default many could be checked in case of an error in some of them, then logged which one worked).

...

The (correct) reverting could happen to be more sophisticated, because you may have to pop something out accordingly; or the pushing to the lists may be postponed a little - done in the end of the loops, after the iterations have went without errors.

That would be hindered or complicated if the intermediate code depends on the pushes to the lists.

So if everything is fine, the values would be pushed to the main pattern-store, otherwise they would be cancelled and the cycle would be adjusted and repeated.

Well, these are "transactions". Perhaps there's an easier way to do that, also, something like simple databases, if needed.

They may come in handy due to the general query language for generating reports.

e.g.

SELECT * from scanP where len_f_list = 0

SELECT * from scanP where len_f_list > 5 and ix > 245 and ...

These are just the simplest use-cases.

...

As of the clutter that would grow --> the custom preprocessor, that would add all these additional functions over the generic code.

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 10, 2018

But what really need is values of variables before an error, whatever the error is.
Pycharm is telling me that "variables are not available" You got them from np.shape(pylist)?
How does that work? Or Pickle, but I only need a few steps back, not the whole log? Some kind of running buffer?

I used simple printing. To get it as output, without saving to a file explicitly, it's just:

python dblobs.py > log.txt

The output of print would go there.

np.shape(list) returns just the shape of a general list.

Better than print is to save to a log-structure and to a file/to files explicitly with flags on/off.
The data overload could be partially solved by pausing the run or saving not all data, but just a limited amount of times during the run (if there still are many exceptions).

...

Yes, it could be a running buffer, like a stack, where the desired variables are stored and after certain amount of steps the oldest are removed.

When there's an error - print that buffer or collect these recent data for another log.

You could also print for every step, but pause the run when there's an error:

cv2.waitKey(0) #any key

or

blah = input("prompt") #waits for enter

...

BTW, maybe the most appropriate way is to use Python's reflection functions.

Some simple ones are:

globals() returns a dictionary of the global vars (global var....) - both names and values
locals() - the ones in the function/local running context

So they can be printed directly or more pretty by a simple iteration, not manually per variable.
They can also be changed, new variables added, the values changed by iterating this structure.

context = locals()
print(context)

wanted_vars = ['P', '_P', 'blob', 'ix', '_ix']  #whatever identifiers

for w in wanted_vars:
  print(context[w])

http://blog.lerner.co.il/four-ways-to-assign-variables-in-python/

...

I see there's a new more sophisticated module in Python 3.7:

https://docs.python.org/3/library/contextvars.html
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/50854974/context-variables-in-python
https://twitter.com/raymondh/status/959455137893793793

It's possible that Pycharm loses the variables due to those "thread leaching" explained in the twitter post.

We'll see, maybe locals()/globals() would be enough, though, I don't know.

...

I guess you don't know to rerun wrong cycles with altered data, but I imagine the following possible procedure, which I think is interesting and may be useful later.

So, the context would be copied in the beginning of a function, maybe just locals() would be enough, or also in the beginning or/and ending of each iteration, as long as the memory allows.

...

The function content would be nested within two other loops, though, in order to allow rerunning.


import contextvars #if needed
#locals, globals are built-in functions

def scan(....):
  # copy the local context or selected items  
  while initfunc:**
  ...  # immediately after the header
  ... # load the context from the copy - it could be changed from the exception block
      # init loop variables
    while processing: # embraces your processing loop
       while _ix <= x:  # the actual loop
         if (not processing): break 
         #or at the end of the cycle, after the exception handling t

       try: 
       ...
       except ... : 
          # print the local context
          # copy the old context, change some of the variables if desirable
          processing = False
          continue   # in general, when using continue in a while loop, it's important not to forget to check whether the counters/logic is updated in the alternative branches, in order to avoid endless loops          
      ...

        #end of while _ix<...     

When there's an exception, you could log, dump etc., but also revert the values to the copied ones, change some and rerun the current loop/the function with the changed values*.

If everything is OK, "processing" flag would be set to True and the cycle would end when ix<... finishes.

In the exception block, it would be set to False, then checked and the processing loop - thus interrupted.

Then control goes back to the upper loop, the local variables/parameters are reset.

The context could be saved on each cycle in a running round-robin buffer.

...

That changing of values could go also for adjusting some border cases in experimental comparisons, like these y < ... x < ... In case of an error, several combinations could be checked automatically (or by default many could be checked in case of an error in some of them, then logged which one worked).

...

The (correct) reverting could happen to be more sophisticated, because you may have to pop something out accordingly; or the pushing to the lists may be postponed a little - done in the end of the loops, after the iterations have went without errors.

That would be hindered or complicated if the intermediate code depends on the pushes to the lists.

So if everything is fine, the values would be pushed to the main pattern-store, otherwise they would be cancelled and the cycle would be adjusted and repeated.

Well, these are "transactions". Perhaps there's an easier way to do that, also, something like simple databases, if needed.

They may come in handy due to the general query language for generating reports.

e.g.

SELECT * from scanP where len_f_list = 0

SELECT * from scanP where len_f_list > 5 and ix > 245 and ...

These are just the simplest use-cases.

...

As of the clutter that would grow --> the custom preprocessor, that would add all these additional functions over the generic code.

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Conversion - in your case maybe nothing. Py2 accepts print without parentheses, there are differences in some libraries syntax and parameters and new features, renamed functions, but your code is generic.

The required libraries you import have to be reinstalled in their versions for 3, though

I use Py3 and didn't have to convert it.

OK about scan_P.

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Twenkid commented Sep 11, 2018

Conversion - in your case maybe nothing. Py2 accepts print without parentheses, there are differences in some libraries syntax and parameters and new features, renamed functions, but your code is generic.

The required libraries you import have to be reinstalled in their versions for 3, though

I use Py3 and didn't have to convert it.

OK about scan_P.

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Please see the code and the comments: https://github.com/Twenkid/CogAlg/blob/master/frame_dblobs_debug.py

I used additional modules: copy and re (regular expressions) to record the states correctly and to format the printouts a bit, because the Python default dumps lack new lines and the average text editors are punished. (Special ones are needed for big files.)

There should be some modules for "pretty print" like this one: https://docs.python.org/2/library/pprint.html

But I think my simple reg-exes are fine for a start.

...

One suggestion: I think putting mnemonic stable labels in comments at the important comparisons or processing, as with these tracking labels, would be helpful, because the line numbers change more often. Also, these labels could be automatically used for generating such record-points with meaningful names (an automatic label-generator could be made also.)

(A custom debugger should show the actual code as well, of course)

BTW, I noticed also that Pycharm sometimes disturbs the formatting, adds new lines and spaces when copy-pasting code. (For working with just one file, cloning from a repository, creating new folders etc. is an overkill.)

prefork005_preloop
call_preloop

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Twenkid commented Sep 11, 2018

Please see the code and the comments: https://github.com/Twenkid/CogAlg/blob/master/frame_dblobs_debug.py

I used additional modules: copy and re (regular expressions) to record the states correctly and to format the printouts a bit, because the Python default dumps lack new lines and the average text editors are punished. (Special ones are needed for big files.)

There should be some modules for "pretty print" like this one: https://docs.python.org/2/library/pprint.html

But I think my simple reg-exes are fine for a start.

...

One suggestion: I think putting mnemonic stable labels in comments at the important comparisons or processing, as with these tracking labels, would be helpful, because the line numbers change more often. Also, these labels could be automatically used for generating such record-points with meaningful names (an automatic label-generator could be made also.)

(A custom debugger should show the actual code as well, of course)

BTW, I noticed also that Pycharm sometimes disturbs the formatting, adds new lines and spaces when copy-pasting code. (For working with just one file, cloning from a repository, creating new folders etc. is an overkill.)

prefork005_preloop
call_preloop

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I'm glad it's in a good direction.

Just stepping through the code in pycharm, I noticed that the first error
is at y==7, x~823.
Which is weird because error line: if fork[0][0][5] == 1:
shouldn't run at x > X - 200?

Isn't it a row earlier? The log from my run, displayed in the screenshots, shows x = 822.
Also, wasn't the shape 768,1024, i.e. 1024-200 = 824?

This is certainly a good start, although my blob variables are too complex:
pretty much unintelligible without hierarchical unfolding (as in pycharm
variables).
Do you know how they do it, or maybe we can automatically display and
buffer them?

Well, I have a few ideas.

Debuggers are supposed to modify the original code with additional checks (assertions); they add breakpoints (the CPUs themselves have functions for debug-oriented breaks) and have full access to the runtime structures. In Python, the user also has, through the reflection functions like locals().

One solution:

  • A preprocessing code generator would add watching code before each line, or more selectively - only before code which is not obvious or is erroneus, like with these locals(), but more complex. During analysis, the generator knows current line number and current file.
This:

if x < X - 200:  # right error margin: >len(fork_P[6])?
                ini = 1
                if y > rng * 2 + 1:  # beyond the first line of _Ps
                    if len(_fork_) == 1:  # always > 0: fork_ appended outside scan_P_?
                        if _fork_[0][0][5] == 1:  # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
                            blob_seg = form_blob_seg(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # _P (y-2) is packed in _fork_[0] blob segment + __fork_ (y-3)
                            ini = 0  # no seg initialization
                            return ini, blob_seg

Could turn to something like that:

#watched - selected variables which have to be recorded
#assertions - checks of some of the variables, it would be an object of a class at best - this is optional, probably not needed for now, the code itself does checks and breaks on errors

Debug(151, locals(), watched, assertions);   #the following line is 151 in the original file
try:
  if x < X - 200:  # right error margin: >len(fork_P[6])?
                ini = 1
                if y > rng * 2 + 1:  # beyond the first line of _Ps
                    if len(_fork_) == 1:  # always > 0: fork_ appended outside scan_P_?
                        if _fork_[0][0][5] == 1:  # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
                            blob_seg = form_blob_seg(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # _P (y-2) is packed in _fork_[0] blob segment + __fork_ (y-3)
                            ini = 0  # no seg initialization
                            return ini, blob_seg
  ...

With these function, more complex that just logging in the current version, we could pause the execution like Pycharm does - Debug could have logic for waiting for user input, which could be triggered dynamically, and also interactively watch certain variables.

I'd also add debug-processing before each line (not selectively) in order to do executed code unfolding.

Instead of jumping within a source file like the normal debuggers do, which is more distracting, because it breaks the continuity, it would print which lines are executed linearly with indenting and nesting, with some wached variables or other indications.

It could be with formatting (HTML, colors, font-size) and emphasize or deemphasize this or that.

It could also be interactive - currently observed segment is drawn like this, say 1000 or 10000 lines around.

This may allow us to detect visually certain error patterns or anomalies.

Tracking tuple-list structures

I'll try pprint or look for other tools, which automatically unfold nested structures when printing.

However, if you mean the problem of losing the variable identifiers during tuple packing?

I think of one solution, while still keeping tuples (your choice).

Maybe it'd be easier if using class objects, because they have a type and their variables are named, but I'm not sure about that, because you're right that it adds clutter.

With just tuples, I'd traverse the code sequentially as executed and would find the assignment operations and append and pop.

Parsing is required, but I developed one in a couple of days in a previous CogAlg session, then discovered that Python itself has functons for that and for compiling. So that kind of parsing is not complex.

The Debug-each-line thing may help by searching for differences between current and previous states.

Say:

blob_seg = _P, [_P], ave_x, 0, _fork_, len(root_)
=>
blob_seg = _P, [_P], ave_x, 0, _fork_, len(root_), **GetID(161)**

 buff_.append((_P, _x, _fork_, root_))
==>
 buff_.append((_P, _x, _fork_, root_, **GetID(149)**)

The simplest return value for "GetID" could be just an identifier or a number which is mapped to the different types of variables.

Thus the types also would have to be enumerated and classified, so that they know what they expect.

When reading those modified tuples back, the left hand side would have to be modified accordingly, too, and we shouldn't miss an assignment, because it would break the mapping.

_P, _x, _fork_, root_, **ID** = _buff_.popleft()

Then the Debug part could use the ID as a type-identifier and print the respective tuples with the respective labels: x, m, d ... Or more information, if we pack the ID to point to somewhere else.

(
You once mentioned about tracking the object IDs in Pycharm, I think that's their address, it's what is printed by default if a class object is fed to print():
<__main__.dP_Class object at 0x7fa247bddc50>

However inside the constructed tuples there would be just the id of the compound object.
)

In general, code without explicit complex named data structures may seem more elegant for nesting etc., but we see the drawbacks. Classes deal with the "type-stuff" automatically, but are more cluttered.

Another solution could be to do a more complex code transformation:

Annotation of where the data types are defined - the first assignments.

Then automatic generation of classes, based on that structure.

Then when using the respective structure - using a class object, instead of a tuple.

With proper comments, it could be automated:

E.g.


dP = 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, []  # lateral difference pattern = pri_s, I, D, Dy, V, Vy, ders2_

class dP_Class:
  __init__(s, pri_s, I, D, Dy, V, Vy, ders2_): #s - self  ... 
      s.pri_s = pri_s
      s.I = I
      s.D = D
      s.Dy = Dy
      s.V = V
      s.Vy =  Vy
      s.ders2_ = ders2_

Then:

dP = dP_Class(0,0,0,0,0,0,[])

Then when needed for printing, using reflection functions (they could be syntactically sophisticated, though):
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9058305/getting-attributes-of-a-class

Or using our class definitions (with simple parsing of the constructor header: s, pri_s, I, D, Dy, V, Vy, ders2) in order to print labels.

...

I'd choose the tuple-extension for now. It seems easier and easier to debug.

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 12, 2018

I'm glad it's in a good direction.

Just stepping through the code in pycharm, I noticed that the first error
is at y==7, x~823.
Which is weird because error line: if fork[0][0][5] == 1:
shouldn't run at x > X - 200?

Isn't it a row earlier? The log from my run, displayed in the screenshots, shows x = 822.
Also, wasn't the shape 768,1024, i.e. 1024-200 = 824?

This is certainly a good start, although my blob variables are too complex:
pretty much unintelligible without hierarchical unfolding (as in pycharm
variables).
Do you know how they do it, or maybe we can automatically display and
buffer them?

Well, I have a few ideas.

Debuggers are supposed to modify the original code with additional checks (assertions); they add breakpoints (the CPUs themselves have functions for debug-oriented breaks) and have full access to the runtime structures. In Python, the user also has, through the reflection functions like locals().

One solution:

  • A preprocessing code generator would add watching code before each line, or more selectively - only before code which is not obvious or is erroneus, like with these locals(), but more complex. During analysis, the generator knows current line number and current file.
This:

if x < X - 200:  # right error margin: >len(fork_P[6])?
                ini = 1
                if y > rng * 2 + 1:  # beyond the first line of _Ps
                    if len(_fork_) == 1:  # always > 0: fork_ appended outside scan_P_?
                        if _fork_[0][0][5] == 1:  # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
                            blob_seg = form_blob_seg(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # _P (y-2) is packed in _fork_[0] blob segment + __fork_ (y-3)
                            ini = 0  # no seg initialization
                            return ini, blob_seg

Could turn to something like that:

#watched - selected variables which have to be recorded
#assertions - checks of some of the variables, it would be an object of a class at best - this is optional, probably not needed for now, the code itself does checks and breaks on errors

Debug(151, locals(), watched, assertions);   #the following line is 151 in the original file
try:
  if x < X - 200:  # right error margin: >len(fork_P[6])?
                ini = 1
                if y > rng * 2 + 1:  # beyond the first line of _Ps
                    if len(_fork_) == 1:  # always > 0: fork_ appended outside scan_P_?
                        if _fork_[0][0][5] == 1:  # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
                            blob_seg = form_blob_seg(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # _P (y-2) is packed in _fork_[0] blob segment + __fork_ (y-3)
                            ini = 0  # no seg initialization
                            return ini, blob_seg
  ...

With these function, more complex that just logging in the current version, we could pause the execution like Pycharm does - Debug could have logic for waiting for user input, which could be triggered dynamically, and also interactively watch certain variables.

I'd also add debug-processing before each line (not selectively) in order to do executed code unfolding.

Instead of jumping within a source file like the normal debuggers do, which is more distracting, because it breaks the continuity, it would print which lines are executed linearly with indenting and nesting, with some wached variables or other indications.

It could be with formatting (HTML, colors, font-size) and emphasize or deemphasize this or that.

It could also be interactive - currently observed segment is drawn like this, say 1000 or 10000 lines around.

This may allow us to detect visually certain error patterns or anomalies.

Tracking tuple-list structures

I'll try pprint or look for other tools, which automatically unfold nested structures when printing.

However, if you mean the problem of losing the variable identifiers during tuple packing?

I think of one solution, while still keeping tuples (your choice).

Maybe it'd be easier if using class objects, because they have a type and their variables are named, but I'm not sure about that, because you're right that it adds clutter.

With just tuples, I'd traverse the code sequentially as executed and would find the assignment operations and append and pop.

Parsing is required, but I developed one in a couple of days in a previous CogAlg session, then discovered that Python itself has functons for that and for compiling. So that kind of parsing is not complex.

The Debug-each-line thing may help by searching for differences between current and previous states.

Say:

blob_seg = _P, [_P], ave_x, 0, _fork_, len(root_)
=>
blob_seg = _P, [_P], ave_x, 0, _fork_, len(root_), **GetID(161)**

 buff_.append((_P, _x, _fork_, root_))
==>
 buff_.append((_P, _x, _fork_, root_, **GetID(149)**)

The simplest return value for "GetID" could be just an identifier or a number which is mapped to the different types of variables.

Thus the types also would have to be enumerated and classified, so that they know what they expect.

When reading those modified tuples back, the left hand side would have to be modified accordingly, too, and we shouldn't miss an assignment, because it would break the mapping.

_P, _x, _fork_, root_, **ID** = _buff_.popleft()

Then the Debug part could use the ID as a type-identifier and print the respective tuples with the respective labels: x, m, d ... Or more information, if we pack the ID to point to somewhere else.

(
You once mentioned about tracking the object IDs in Pycharm, I think that's their address, it's what is printed by default if a class object is fed to print():
<__main__.dP_Class object at 0x7fa247bddc50>

However inside the constructed tuples there would be just the id of the compound object.
)

In general, code without explicit complex named data structures may seem more elegant for nesting etc., but we see the drawbacks. Classes deal with the "type-stuff" automatically, but are more cluttered.

Another solution could be to do a more complex code transformation:

Annotation of where the data types are defined - the first assignments.

Then automatic generation of classes, based on that structure.

Then when using the respective structure - using a class object, instead of a tuple.

With proper comments, it could be automated:

E.g.


dP = 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, []  # lateral difference pattern = pri_s, I, D, Dy, V, Vy, ders2_

class dP_Class:
  __init__(s, pri_s, I, D, Dy, V, Vy, ders2_): #s - self  ... 
      s.pri_s = pri_s
      s.I = I
      s.D = D
      s.Dy = Dy
      s.V = V
      s.Vy =  Vy
      s.ders2_ = ders2_

Then:

dP = dP_Class(0,0,0,0,0,0,[])

Then when needed for printing, using reflection functions (they could be syntactically sophisticated, though):
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9058305/getting-attributes-of-a-class

Or using our class definitions (with simple parsing of the constructor header: s, pri_s, I, D, Dy, V, Vy, ders2) in order to print labels.

...

I'd choose the tuple-extension for now. It seems easier and easier to debug.

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BTW, regarding classes, I overcomplicated it - complex reflection is not needed. We know the members, thus a simple function that prints the items, defined in each class, possibly generated by the class constructor parameters list or manual, they are a few, would do the job.

I know the alg. doesn't need classes for now but I speculate that with the progress of understanding and knowing better what it's doing, they may happen to be handy. Including about self-modifying code, adding or removing members from the classes in run time.

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Twenkid commented Sep 12, 2018

BTW, regarding classes, I overcomplicated it - complex reflection is not needed. We know the members, thus a simple function that prints the items, defined in each class, possibly generated by the class constructor parameters list or manual, they are a few, would do the job.

I know the alg. doesn't need classes for now but I speculate that with the progress of understanding and knowing better what it's doing, they may happen to be handy. Including about self-modifying code, adding or removing members from the classes in run time.

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Actually, I meant manual unfolding, as in pycharm variables.
My patterns / blobs have hierarchical structure, I want be able to click on
higher levels to see lower-level details selectively, or just skip them.

I understood that, as well, yes. It could be done. The default GUI component for that is called :
TreeView

It could be done in Python, too, either with a tree view from some GUI library or with a simpler custom component which renders the GUI in, say, OpenCV, it doesn't have to be visually polished.

However you obviously need to know the structure of the tree, before rendering it correctly...

It would open in a separate window. It might be useful also to click on the input image and see respective patterns. Eventually - to make selections and run something on them, make summaries, collect items aside and then compare them etc.
...

We can automatically parse "some" trees, yet being uninformed, because the nested structures are trees - based on parentheses and brackets, - but it doesn't suggests the types and the labels by default and whether a list or a tuple is a leaf (same-level), or a branch (new level).
Also, that may require to traverse the structure, after first printing it somewhere (like print or pprint).

The types within the blob could be "guessed" based on knowledge about the algorithm, the length of the tuples, which are lists, where are borderlines between tuples and lists etc., but that's rather unnecessary overhead since it could "know" them exactly.

As of types, I think I've suggested named tuples as alternatives? (for having identifiers), but you've skipped them?

https://docs.python.org/2/library/collections.html#collections.namedtuple

BTW, this discussion suggests a huge memory usage. About 10M of the simplest two-tuples eat up about 1G RAM for unique objects and 120MB in case of just 10M references to the same object.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/45123238/python-class-vs-tuple-huge-memory-overhead


> I just added a simple try-except to frame_dblobs:

try:
    if _fork_[0][0][5] == 1:  # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
        blob_seg = form_blob_seg(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # _P (y-2) is
packed in _fork_[0] blob segment + __fork_ (y-3)
        ini = 0  # no blob segment initialization
        return ini, blob_seg
except:
    break

and put a breakpoint before "break", that preserved variable values.
That's ok for now, I just didn't know about try-except :).

Good that you're learning. You mean you're now watching it online in the IDE?

Usually it's desirable the exception to have some processing (exception handling), at least print or logging, and not just skipping the error, but if you know what it's returning already and it's a quick temporary solution, that's OK.

I don't know, it seems that classes are mostly useful for linking disparate
programs, and cogalg is self-contained.
Anyway, there are better things to focus on for now.

It's self-contained, but the individual operations, data and functions are discontinuous as well and the practical programs are more than the core algorithm. Especially during development.

OOP allows operator overloading. I guess you wouldn't want that for now, it may be confusing, but again - in long term, as understanding and generalization grows, it may get more convenient and allow more concise notation within the code.

OOP could be useful for exception handling like to pack info about the exceptions.
OOP also keeps closer together code and data, which is convenient, allow generalization and reduction of code duplication; it allows control of the way data is accessed (encapsulation), easy extension on a single site etc.

There would be an overhead, though in the already memory-hungry Python.

But once that the algorithm is clear and debugged well enough, it would be ported anyway.

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 13, 2018

Actually, I meant manual unfolding, as in pycharm variables.
My patterns / blobs have hierarchical structure, I want be able to click on
higher levels to see lower-level details selectively, or just skip them.

I understood that, as well, yes. It could be done. The default GUI component for that is called :
TreeView

It could be done in Python, too, either with a tree view from some GUI library or with a simpler custom component which renders the GUI in, say, OpenCV, it doesn't have to be visually polished.

However you obviously need to know the structure of the tree, before rendering it correctly...

It would open in a separate window. It might be useful also to click on the input image and see respective patterns. Eventually - to make selections and run something on them, make summaries, collect items aside and then compare them etc.
...

We can automatically parse "some" trees, yet being uninformed, because the nested structures are trees - based on parentheses and brackets, - but it doesn't suggests the types and the labels by default and whether a list or a tuple is a leaf (same-level), or a branch (new level).
Also, that may require to traverse the structure, after first printing it somewhere (like print or pprint).

The types within the blob could be "guessed" based on knowledge about the algorithm, the length of the tuples, which are lists, where are borderlines between tuples and lists etc., but that's rather unnecessary overhead since it could "know" them exactly.

As of types, I think I've suggested named tuples as alternatives? (for having identifiers), but you've skipped them?

https://docs.python.org/2/library/collections.html#collections.namedtuple

BTW, this discussion suggests a huge memory usage. About 10M of the simplest two-tuples eat up about 1G RAM for unique objects and 120MB in case of just 10M references to the same object.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/45123238/python-class-vs-tuple-huge-memory-overhead


> I just added a simple try-except to frame_dblobs:

try:
    if _fork_[0][0][5] == 1:  # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
        blob_seg = form_blob_seg(_fork_[0], _P, _x)  # _P (y-2) is
packed in _fork_[0] blob segment + __fork_ (y-3)
        ini = 0  # no blob segment initialization
        return ini, blob_seg
except:
    break

and put a breakpoint before "break", that preserved variable values.
That's ok for now, I just didn't know about try-except :).

Good that you're learning. You mean you're now watching it online in the IDE?

Usually it's desirable the exception to have some processing (exception handling), at least print or logging, and not just skipping the error, but if you know what it's returning already and it's a quick temporary solution, that's OK.

I don't know, it seems that classes are mostly useful for linking disparate
programs, and cogalg is self-contained.
Anyway, there are better things to focus on for now.

It's self-contained, but the individual operations, data and functions are discontinuous as well and the practical programs are more than the core algorithm. Especially during development.

OOP allows operator overloading. I guess you wouldn't want that for now, it may be confusing, but again - in long term, as understanding and generalization grows, it may get more convenient and allow more concise notation within the code.

OOP could be useful for exception handling like to pack info about the exceptions.
OOP also keeps closer together code and data, which is convenient, allow generalization and reduction of code duplication; it allows control of the way data is accessed (encapsulation), easy extension on a single site etc.

There would be an overhead, though in the already memory-hungry Python.

But once that the algorithm is clear and debugged well enough, it would be ported anyway.

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(Oh, I thought it didn't sent - so this is a shorter version of the above comment... :) )

Actually, I meant manual unfolding, as in pycharm variables.
My patterns / blobs have hierarchical structure, I want be able to click on
higher levels to see lower-level details selectively, or just skip them.

I know that you meant that, as well, the GUI element is called TreeView.
It could be done "locally" in Python as well with a GUI library or with a custom simple control, drawing with OpenCV for example.

However you need to know the structure of the tree, which element is a leaf and which is a branch and where each ends - without types it would be ambiguous. Some tree could be parsed and built, based on the ( ) [], but the types shoud be inferred somehow - again it's possible by some knowledge of the lengths and structure of the used tuples, but it's explicit in their initializations and in assignments, which have to be mapped.

I just added a simple try-except to frame_dblobs:

try:
if fork[0][0][5] == 1: # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
blob_seg = form_blob_seg(fork[0], _P, _x) # _P (y-2) is
packed in fork[0] blob segment + _fork (y-3)
ini = 0 # no blob segment initialization
return ini, blob_seg
except:
break

and put a breakpoint before "break", that preserved variable values.
That's ok for now, I just didn't know about try-except :).

Good!

I don't know, it seems that classes are mostly useful for linking disparate
programs, and cogalg is self-contained.
Anyway, there are better things to focus on for now.

OOP has many other usages, e.g. operator overloading, generalization of code and reduction of code duplication, extension of classes (in Python - in runtime as well) and making the code more compact or/and readable on the site of accessing the functions, encoded in the object-oriented part.

OOP also divides the complexity between subsystems and is for making explicit hierarchical systems.

...

BTW, if I'm not mistaken, I've suggested the named tuples in the past, but you've dismissed them?
They lay in between classes and tuples:
https://docs.python.org/2/library/collections.html#collections.namedtuple

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 13, 2018

(Oh, I thought it didn't sent - so this is a shorter version of the above comment... :) )

Actually, I meant manual unfolding, as in pycharm variables.
My patterns / blobs have hierarchical structure, I want be able to click on
higher levels to see lower-level details selectively, or just skip them.

I know that you meant that, as well, the GUI element is called TreeView.
It could be done "locally" in Python as well with a GUI library or with a custom simple control, drawing with OpenCV for example.

However you need to know the structure of the tree, which element is a leaf and which is a branch and where each ends - without types it would be ambiguous. Some tree could be parsed and built, based on the ( ) [], but the types shoud be inferred somehow - again it's possible by some knowledge of the lengths and structure of the used tuples, but it's explicit in their initializations and in assignments, which have to be mapped.

I just added a simple try-except to frame_dblobs:

try:
if fork[0][0][5] == 1: # _fork roots, see ln161, never == 1?
blob_seg = form_blob_seg(fork[0], _P, _x) # _P (y-2) is
packed in fork[0] blob segment + _fork (y-3)
ini = 0 # no blob segment initialization
return ini, blob_seg
except:
break

and put a breakpoint before "break", that preserved variable values.
That's ok for now, I just didn't know about try-except :).

Good!

I don't know, it seems that classes are mostly useful for linking disparate
programs, and cogalg is self-contained.
Anyway, there are better things to focus on for now.

OOP has many other usages, e.g. operator overloading, generalization of code and reduction of code duplication, extension of classes (in Python - in runtime as well) and making the code more compact or/and readable on the site of accessing the functions, encoded in the object-oriented part.

OOP also divides the complexity between subsystems and is for making explicit hierarchical systems.

...

BTW, if I'm not mistaken, I've suggested the named tuples in the past, but you've dismissed them?
They lay in between classes and tuples:
https://docs.python.org/2/library/collections.html#collections.namedtuple

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So my next task will be to apply a hierarchical/Tree view GUI for the output, for a start without labels. I'm a bit tired lately, so if don't manage to complete it to a milestone tomorrow, I may have a little break for a few days and will show something probably next week.

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Twenkid commented Sep 13, 2018

So my next task will be to apply a hierarchical/Tree view GUI for the output, for a start without labels. I'm a bit tired lately, so if don't manage to complete it to a milestone tomorrow, I may have a little break for a few days and will show something probably next week.

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(
You once mentioned about tracking the object IDs in Pycharm, I think
that's their address, it's what is printed by default if a class object is
fed to print():
<main.dP_Class object at 0x7fa247bddc50>

However inside the constructed tuples there would be just the id of the
compound object.
)

Interesting... That id loss might be why my blobs don't accumulate.

I assume you refer to id(variable)?

Another id is is the memory address in Pycharm <memory at 0x0000022BD96C7648>

charm_address

If the tuples are added without being divided in parts and then recollected, they may preserve their ids, but if you read the values and then recollect them : a,b,c = _P.popleft; _P.append(a,b,c) it's supposed to be another object.

It's visible in this simple test:

a = 1,2,3
d.append(a)
d
[(1, 2, 3)]
id(d)
1737922795976
id(a)
1737910335096
id(d[0])
1737910335096 #The tuple preserves its ID

x1, y1, z1 = d.pop()
d.append( (x1,y1,z1) ) #The tuple is recreated
id(d[0])
1737922805264 #It's now a new object

In ln145, fork_.append([]), that empty list is only to reserve an object id
for _P, which is replaced by a blob on the next scan line.

Future blob will replace _P by pop + appended (ln175, ln176), vs. by
assignment, because that's supposed to preserve object id.

But that would only happen on the next line, after P_.append((P, x, fork_))
on ln179.

So, fork_ is packed into tuple, and you are saying that destroys all
internal IDs?

And that can be prevented by naming the elements?

So my next task will be to apply a hierarchical/Tree view GUI for the
output, for a start without labels. I'm a bit tired lately, so if don't
manage to complete it to a milestone tomorrow, I may have a little break
for a few days and will show something probably next week.
That seems redundant for now, online pycharm does the job.

Could you work on converting to named tuples instead, if that preserves
object ID?
That would also help you to understand the code, and see which technical
implementations are helpful?

OK, if there's a reallocation, I don't know would it help, it'd be a new object.
But it could help if I do as with the tuple extension suggestion - by adding an additional variable to each tuple, called "id". When an object is recreated, it would copy that stable id, while the Python's internal one would change.

The assignment would be again something like GetID() in order to get it from a generator - the simplest is a counter, and the number would be mapped at least to a type (in case of named tuple that won't be necessary).

...

As of the Tree View - I've used that control and ironically I have drawn a similar icon like the Pycharm's one...

assistant_treeview_callgraph

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 14, 2018

(
You once mentioned about tracking the object IDs in Pycharm, I think
that's their address, it's what is printed by default if a class object is
fed to print():
<main.dP_Class object at 0x7fa247bddc50>

However inside the constructed tuples there would be just the id of the
compound object.
)

Interesting... That id loss might be why my blobs don't accumulate.

I assume you refer to id(variable)?

Another id is is the memory address in Pycharm <memory at 0x0000022BD96C7648>

charm_address

If the tuples are added without being divided in parts and then recollected, they may preserve their ids, but if you read the values and then recollect them : a,b,c = _P.popleft; _P.append(a,b,c) it's supposed to be another object.

It's visible in this simple test:

a = 1,2,3
d.append(a)
d
[(1, 2, 3)]
id(d)
1737922795976
id(a)
1737910335096
id(d[0])
1737910335096 #The tuple preserves its ID

x1, y1, z1 = d.pop()
d.append( (x1,y1,z1) ) #The tuple is recreated
id(d[0])
1737922805264 #It's now a new object

In ln145, fork_.append([]), that empty list is only to reserve an object id
for _P, which is replaced by a blob on the next scan line.

Future blob will replace _P by pop + appended (ln175, ln176), vs. by
assignment, because that's supposed to preserve object id.

But that would only happen on the next line, after P_.append((P, x, fork_))
on ln179.

So, fork_ is packed into tuple, and you are saying that destroys all
internal IDs?

And that can be prevented by naming the elements?

So my next task will be to apply a hierarchical/Tree view GUI for the
output, for a start without labels. I'm a bit tired lately, so if don't
manage to complete it to a milestone tomorrow, I may have a little break
for a few days and will show something probably next week.
That seems redundant for now, online pycharm does the job.

Could you work on converting to named tuples instead, if that preserves
object ID?
That would also help you to understand the code, and see which technical
implementations are helpful?

OK, if there's a reallocation, I don't know would it help, it'd be a new object.
But it could help if I do as with the tuple extension suggestion - by adding an additional variable to each tuple, called "id". When an object is recreated, it would copy that stable id, while the Python's internal one would change.

The assignment would be again something like GetID() in order to get it from a generator - the simplest is a counter, and the number would be mapped at least to a type (in case of named tuple that won't be necessary).

...

As of the Tree View - I've used that control and ironically I have drawn a similar icon like the Pycharm's one...

assistant_treeview_callgraph

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I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples
should preserve them.
I just did that:
ln149: buff_.append([P, x, fork, root])
ln179: P
.append([P, x, fork_]) # P with no overlap to next P is buffered
for next-line scan_P
, via y_comp
But if fork[0][0][5] == 1: is still always false

Of the elements - then that may add requirement for an id per element, not just per tuple, thus making even the single elements tuples.

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples
should preserve them.
I just did that:
ln149: buff_.append([P, x, fork, root])
ln179: P
.append([P, x, fork_]) # P with no overlap to next P is buffered
for next-line scan_P
, via y_comp
But if fork[0][0][5] == 1: is still always false

OK.
Is the error still that fork is empty?
If so, then just none of these lists and items exist, neither fork[0], from there on the sub-patterns or their parts, so these lists are not created and filled with data.

Something in blob, blob_seg, term_blob, ... family of functions, because I see fork_ is loaded from there?

I don't see why the error should have appeared due to different ids - there are no checks of the id in the code? You assign and compare values?

Why do you think it could be because of the ids - something that you're watching in the pycharm debugger?

In ln145, fork_.append([]), that empty list is only to reserve an object id

OK, it does for the container.

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Twenkid commented Sep 14, 2018

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples
should preserve them.
I just did that:
ln149: buff_.append([P, x, fork, root])
ln179: P
.append([P, x, fork_]) # P with no overlap to next P is buffered
for next-line scan_P
, via y_comp
But if fork[0][0][5] == 1: is still always false

Of the elements - then that may add requirement for an id per element, not just per tuple, thus making even the single elements tuples.

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples
should preserve them.
I just did that:
ln149: buff_.append([P, x, fork, root])
ln179: P
.append([P, x, fork_]) # P with no overlap to next P is buffered
for next-line scan_P
, via y_comp
But if fork[0][0][5] == 1: is still always false

OK.
Is the error still that fork is empty?
If so, then just none of these lists and items exist, neither fork[0], from there on the sub-patterns or their parts, so these lists are not created and filled with data.

Something in blob, blob_seg, term_blob, ... family of functions, because I see fork_ is loaded from there?

I don't see why the error should have appeared due to different ids - there are no checks of the id in the code? You assign and compare values?

Why do you think it could be because of the ids - something that you're watching in the pycharm debugger?

In ln145, fork_.append([]), that empty list is only to reserve an object id

OK, it does for the container.

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Boris, I invented something else which seemed easier to do for a start before extending the tuples - a Read-eval-print loop that's entered after an exception and the execution is applied over selected saved state.

We can add and execute code of any complexity by exec().

From simple printing of selected variable/s to modifying them, to functions.

Eventually going back to the function that failed and continuing with those changed values.

Twenkid@e9d7b13


localVars
frame
_P_
_buff_
P_
P
x
_ix
ix
fork_
buff_
root_
_fork_
_x
_P
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(x, _ix)
822 810
====
Directly over the saved states
822 810
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... if (x>_ix): print("x is bigger than _ix", x, _ix)
x is bigger than _ix 822 810
====
Directly over the saved states
x is bigger than _ix 822 810
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... x = 823
====
Directly over the saved states
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(x)
823
====
Directly over the saved states
823
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(buff_)
deque([])
====
Directly over the saved states
deque([])
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(root_)
[[], [], []]
====
Directly over the saved states
[[], [], []]
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(_P)
(0, 449, -131, -106, -2078, -1934, [(69, 0, -242, 5, -240), (70, -10, -261, 0, -238), (70, -23, -290, -10, -250), (68, -35, -316, -23, -274), (64, -37, -327, -33, -301), (57, -24, -318, -30, -317), (51, -2, -324, -15, -314)])
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Twenkid commented Sep 14, 2018

Boris, I invented something else which seemed easier to do for a start before extending the tuples - a Read-eval-print loop that's entered after an exception and the execution is applied over selected saved state.

We can add and execute code of any complexity by exec().

From simple printing of selected variable/s to modifying them, to functions.

Eventually going back to the function that failed and continuing with those changed values.

Twenkid@e9d7b13


localVars
frame
_P_
_buff_
P_
P
x
_ix
ix
fork_
buff_
root_
_fork_
_x
_P
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(x, _ix)
822 810
====
Directly over the saved states
822 810
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... if (x>_ix): print("x is bigger than _ix", x, _ix)
x is bigger than _ix 822 810
====
Directly over the saved states
x is bigger than _ix 822 810
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... x = 823
====
Directly over the saved states
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(x)
823
====
Directly over the saved states
823
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(buff_)
deque([])
====
Directly over the saved states
deque([])
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(root_)
[[], [], []]
====
Directly over the saved states
[[], [], []]
Enter python line (Ctrl-C for exit)... print(_P)
(0, 449, -131, -106, -2078, -1934, [(69, 0, -242, 5, -240), (70, -10, -261, 0, -238), (70, -23, -290, -10, -250), (68, -35, -316, -23, -274), (64, -37, -327, -33, -301), (57, -24, -318, -30, -317), (51, -2, -324, -15, -314)])
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(Preliminary answer, don't have the code at hand right now)

Of the elements - then that may add requirement for an id per element, not just per tuple, thus making even the single elements tuples.
Every object already has an id, and everything but integers is an object, including lists fork_ and root_.

Well, int-s also have to have id-s in Python, because everything in Py is an object of a class.

However in your code some of the types are actually numpy arrays, even with one element, because they are produced from the input image, which is a numpy array.

You could see that in pycharm debugger, the fields are too deep, I noticed a "dtype" element.

The elements in Numpy arrays are packed and you may have two indices that point to the same id. With just "print" they look like normal lists and can be accessed as normal lists with [].

(Tested: https://www.pythonanywhere.com/try-ipython/  )
In [2]: import nump
y as np
In [3]: a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
In [4]: a
Out[4]: array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
In [5]: id(a)
Out[5]: 139810716245168
In [6]: id(a[0])
Out[6]: 139810966726768
In [7]: id(a[1]
   ...: )
Out[7]: 139810966726792
In [8]: id(a[2])
Out[8]: 139810966726792
print(a)
[1 2 3 4 5]

Maybe you could try converting it to list, I think I've tried this, but it was long time ago and it's supposed to be a performance hit.
https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.ndarray.tolist.html

a = np.array([1,2])
a.tolist()
[1, 2]

>>> i = 123
>>> id(i)
93863562748832
>>> j = 235
>>> id(j)
93863562752416
>>> k = []
>>> k.append(i); k.append(j)
>>> k
[123, 235]
>>> id(k[0])
93863562748832
>>> id(k[1])
93863562752416

Lists created like [] should be just lists, but the elements inside could be numpy arrays.
I'll check the types more thoroughly later, or you could see them yourself in the debugger.

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples should preserve them. I just did that: ln149: buff_.append([ P, x, fork, root]) ln179: P.append([P, x, fork_]) # P with no overlap to next P is buffered for next-line scan_P, via y_comp

But if fork[0][0][5] == 1: is still always false OK. Is the error still that fork is empty?
No, but len(root_) and corresponding fork[0][0][5] are always > 1
I have an idea why, I think I messed-up with cross-reference between fork_ and root_, in ln145 and >ln146. Still working it out.

Why do you think it could be because of the ids - something that you're
watching in the pycharm debugger?
ID defines a unique object, in this case fork_ and root_. Which connect patterns between lines: lower-line Ps to higher-line _Ps. That reference is by object id rather than variable names because id is unique but the same var names apply to many patterns. So, the only way _P can be included in the right blob is by id of that blob. If id changes, then blobs won't accumulate: their _Ps won't find them.

a Read-eval-print loop ...
I don't know, Todor, this seems unnecessary at the moment. The tuples can be converted to lists, and pycharm can do all the visualization that I need. My problem is not tinkering with parameters, functions fail because they are not designed right. I would much rather if you worked on the code, otherwise you won't know what tools are needed.

OK. I see, but it may be useful for me for studying the code.

Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 15, 2018

(Preliminary answer, don't have the code at hand right now)

Of the elements - then that may add requirement for an id per element, not just per tuple, thus making even the single elements tuples.
Every object already has an id, and everything but integers is an object, including lists fork_ and root_.

Well, int-s also have to have id-s in Python, because everything in Py is an object of a class.

However in your code some of the types are actually numpy arrays, even with one element, because they are produced from the input image, which is a numpy array.

You could see that in pycharm debugger, the fields are too deep, I noticed a "dtype" element.

The elements in Numpy arrays are packed and you may have two indices that point to the same id. With just "print" they look like normal lists and can be accessed as normal lists with [].

(Tested: https://www.pythonanywhere.com/try-ipython/  )
In [2]: import nump
y as np
In [3]: a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
In [4]: a
Out[4]: array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
In [5]: id(a)
Out[5]: 139810716245168
In [6]: id(a[0])
Out[6]: 139810966726768
In [7]: id(a[1]
   ...: )
Out[7]: 139810966726792
In [8]: id(a[2])
Out[8]: 139810966726792
print(a)
[1 2 3 4 5]

Maybe you could try converting it to list, I think I've tried this, but it was long time ago and it's supposed to be a performance hit.
https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.ndarray.tolist.html

a = np.array([1,2])
a.tolist()
[1, 2]

>>> i = 123
>>> id(i)
93863562748832
>>> j = 235
>>> id(j)
93863562752416
>>> k = []
>>> k.append(i); k.append(j)
>>> k
[123, 235]
>>> id(k[0])
93863562748832
>>> id(k[1])
93863562752416

Lists created like [] should be just lists, but the elements inside could be numpy arrays.
I'll check the types more thoroughly later, or you could see them yourself in the debugger.

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples should preserve them. I just did that: ln149: buff_.append([ P, x, fork, root]) ln179: P.append([P, x, fork_]) # P with no overlap to next P is buffered for next-line scan_P, via y_comp

But if fork[0][0][5] == 1: is still always false OK. Is the error still that fork is empty?
No, but len(root_) and corresponding fork[0][0][5] are always > 1
I have an idea why, I think I messed-up with cross-reference between fork_ and root_, in ln145 and >ln146. Still working it out.

Why do you think it could be because of the ids - something that you're
watching in the pycharm debugger?
ID defines a unique object, in this case fork_ and root_. Which connect patterns between lines: lower-line Ps to higher-line _Ps. That reference is by object id rather than variable names because id is unique but the same var names apply to many patterns. So, the only way _P can be included in the right blob is by id of that blob. If id changes, then blobs won't accumulate: their _Ps won't find them.

a Read-eval-print loop ...
I don't know, Todor, this seems unnecessary at the moment. The tuples can be converted to lists, and pycharm can do all the visualization that I need. My problem is not tinkering with parameters, functions fail because they are not designed right. I would much rather if you worked on the code, otherwise you won't know what tools are needed.

OK. I see, but it may be useful for me for studying the code.

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  • on the id test.

Here numpy arrays are printed without commas.


In [22]: a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
In [23]: c = a[2]
In [24]: print(id(c))
139810966726816
In [25]: b = a.tolist()
In [26]: print(b)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
In [27]: id(a[0])
Out[27]: 139810966726792
In [28]: id(a[1])
Out[28]: 139810966726792
In [29]: id(a[2])
Out[29]: 139810966726792
In [30]: id(a[3])
In [31]: id(b[0])
Out[30]: 139810966726792

In [31]: id(b[0])
Out[31]: 38818136

In [32]: id(b[1])
Out[32]: 38818112

In [33]: id(b[2])
Out[33]: 38818088

In [34]: id(b[3])
Out[34]: 38818064
Collaborator

Twenkid commented Sep 15, 2018

  • on the id test.

Here numpy arrays are printed without commas.


In [22]: a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5])
In [23]: c = a[2]
In [24]: print(id(c))
139810966726816
In [25]: b = a.tolist()
In [26]: print(b)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
In [27]: id(a[0])
Out[27]: 139810966726792
In [28]: id(a[1])
Out[28]: 139810966726792
In [29]: id(a[2])
Out[29]: 139810966726792
In [30]: id(a[3])
In [31]: id(b[0])
Out[30]: 139810966726792

In [31]: id(b[0])
Out[31]: 38818136

In [32]: id(b[1])
Out[32]: 38818112

In [33]: id(b[2])
Out[33]: 38818088

In [34]: id(b[3])
Out[34]: 38818064
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boris-kz commented Sep 16, 2018

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Ok. I remember reading that integers are not objects in Python, but that seems wrong.

I think that was true for Java and C#, besides classes they had also "primitive types" for performance reasons.

What difference does it make? I only care about id of new lists and tuples

Didn't you ask about their elements?:

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples should preserve them. I just did that: ln149: buff_.append([ *P, x, fork, root]) (...)

OK. I see, but it may be useful for me for studying the code.
Or you can use pycharm. No need to reinvent the wheel.

You're right if the goal was just to manually watch the variables in slow step-by-step runs and if one would try to copy the entire Pycharm with all the menus etc. That's too much and unnecessary, I wouldn't do it.

I want to automate operations, create and generate more interesting ones and make existing ones faster, less tedious and easier, such as the manual debugging

The last feature I demonstrated for example could be extended for something else, like temporary code injection and eventually for runtime adaptable code generation, with the respective meta-structures.

The demands would arise on their own while the understanding of the code gets better and such little ideas will combine.

Thanks for your help Todor! I just sent you $1000.00 by PayPal, for 1st half of September.

Thanks, a good start for a new development and prize session!

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Twenkid commented Sep 16, 2018

Ok. I remember reading that integers are not objects in Python, but that seems wrong.

I think that was true for Java and C#, besides classes they had also "primitive types" for performance reasons.

What difference does it make? I only care about id of new lists and tuples

Didn't you ask about their elements?:

I meant id of tuple elements. Actually, using lists instead of tuples should preserve them. I just did that: ln149: buff_.append([ *P, x, fork, root]) (...)

OK. I see, but it may be useful for me for studying the code.
Or you can use pycharm. No need to reinvent the wheel.

You're right if the goal was just to manually watch the variables in slow step-by-step runs and if one would try to copy the entire Pycharm with all the menus etc. That's too much and unnecessary, I wouldn't do it.

I want to automate operations, create and generate more interesting ones and make existing ones faster, less tedious and easier, such as the manual debugging

The last feature I demonstrated for example could be extended for something else, like temporary code injection and eventually for runtime adaptable code generation, with the respective meta-structures.

The demands would arise on their own while the understanding of the code gets better and such little ideas will combine.

Thanks for your help Todor! I just sent you $1000.00 by PayPal, for 1st half of September.

Thanks, a good start for a new development and prize session!

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Yes, the elements that are lists and tuples.

ОК

What you really need at this point is imagination and communication.

The latter depends also on your behavior, you know. Lately you behave well, thanks.

Thanks, a good start for a new development and prize session!
Lets hope this one lasts :).

Yes. :)

I think this is just another excuse for you to avoid working on a code.

Well - if it means avoiding the same way and with the same limitations you impose to yourself while working, "manually" etc. - maybe yes. I know, that before moving forward I'll have to fit in it, but the tools may help me in the way of decoding it, like taking interactive notes. Some tools may make it easier for me and for other developers.

Also I think you've got a wrong expectations that all of the ideas are huge projects with 99999 lines of code and extensive design process. In fact some of them could be developed in an hour, a few hours or days, depending on motivation and unexpected obstacles, and then when combined provide new insights.

I'd better skip the details for now and show when the time comes - as with the logs which you dismissed as wrong, but they happened to be more helpful than just the online debugger.

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Twenkid commented Sep 16, 2018

Yes, the elements that are lists and tuples.

ОК

What you really need at this point is imagination and communication.

The latter depends also on your behavior, you know. Lately you behave well, thanks.

Thanks, a good start for a new development and prize session!
Lets hope this one lasts :).

Yes. :)

I think this is just another excuse for you to avoid working on a code.

Well - if it means avoiding the same way and with the same limitations you impose to yourself while working, "manually" etc. - maybe yes. I know, that before moving forward I'll have to fit in it, but the tools may help me in the way of decoding it, like taking interactive notes. Some tools may make it easier for me and for other developers.

Also I think you've got a wrong expectations that all of the ideas are huge projects with 99999 lines of code and extensive design process. In fact some of them could be developed in an hour, a few hours or days, depending on motivation and unexpected obstacles, and then when combined provide new insights.

I'd better skip the details for now and show when the time comes - as with the logs which you dismissed as wrong, but they happened to be more helpful than just the online debugger.

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boris-kz commented Sep 17, 2018

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And where it gets longer than it had too. Or at the moment it doesn't matter because you're doing a major refactoring and the code would change?

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Twenkid commented Sep 17, 2018

And where it gets longer than it had too. Or at the moment it doesn't matter because you're doing a major refactoring and the code would change?

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> What is excessive len(root_) - root_ with an excessive length?
> Yes, that _fork_[0][0][5] (roots, = len(root_)) which is always >1 Even though there are instances of initial len(root_) == 0|1 

OK

From the code online: https://github.com/boris-kz/CogAlg/blob/master/frame_dblobs.py


while _ix <= x:  # while horizontal overlap between P and _P, after that: P -> P_
        if _buff_:
            _P, _x, _fork_, root_ = _buff_.popleft()  # load _P buffered in prior run of scan_P_, if any
        elif _P_:
            _P, _x, _fork_ = _P_.popleft()  # load _P: y-2, _root_: y-3, starts empty, then contains blobs that replace _Ps
            root_ = []  # Ps connected to current _P
        else:
            break
        _ix = _x - len(_P[6])

        if P[0] == _P[0]:  # if s == _s: core sign match, also selective inclusion by cont eval?
            fork_.append([])  # mutable placeholder for blobs connected to P, filled with Ps after _P inclusion with complete root_
            root_.append(fork_[len(fork_)-1])  # to bind last P in fork_ to _P and then to blob?

if P[0] == _P[0]:

Then root_ is appended. Then if not x > ix: (i.e. x <= ix) a series of IFs are checked, one of which is if len(root) == 0: # never happens?

The other path I see is:

 while _ix <= x:  # while horizontal overlap between P and _P, after that: P -> P_
        if _buff_:
            _P, _x, _fork_, root_ = _buff_.popleft()

So something wrong pushed-poped to buff

There are cases where len(root_) is 0 but are they present when all other conditions are met to get there?

(Thinking out loud, I have to get my hands dirty and I'll do.)

` No, the point where len(root_) is incremented outside of scan_P_ run that formed it. Basically, you pick initial root_ with len(root_) == 0|1, then add something like: track_id = id(root_), then: if id(root_) == track_id, if len(root_) > 0|1 break # add a breakpoint before break

`

Ah, OK, I thought you're using some special hidden debugger functions which track the objects' lifecycle.
I was thinking of a robust tracking of any object that we want, where and when exactly it was created etc., without such manual checks.

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Twenkid commented Sep 17, 2018

> What is excessive len(root_) - root_ with an excessive length?
> Yes, that _fork_[0][0][5] (roots, = len(root_)) which is always >1 Even though there are instances of initial len(root_) == 0|1 

OK

From the code online: https://github.com/boris-kz/CogAlg/blob/master/frame_dblobs.py


while _ix <= x:  # while horizontal overlap between P and _P, after that: P -> P_
        if _buff_:
            _P, _x, _fork_, root_ = _buff_.popleft()  # load _P buffered in prior run of scan_P_, if any
        elif _P_:
            _P, _x, _fork_ = _P_.popleft()  # load _P: y-2, _root_: y-3, starts empty, then contains blobs that replace _Ps
            root_ = []  # Ps connected to current _P
        else:
            break
        _ix = _x - len(_P[6])

        if P[0] == _P[0]:  # if s == _s: core sign match, also selective inclusion by cont eval?
            fork_.append([])  # mutable placeholder for blobs connected to P, filled with Ps after _P inclusion with complete root_
            root_.append(fork_[len(fork_)-1])  # to bind last P in fork_ to _P and then to blob?

if P[0] == _P[0]:

Then root_ is appended. Then if not x > ix: (i.e. x <= ix) a series of IFs are checked, one of which is if len(root) == 0: # never happens?

The other path I see is:

 while _ix <= x:  # while horizontal overlap between P and _P, after that: P -> P_
        if _buff_:
            _P, _x, _fork_, root_ = _buff_.popleft()

So something wrong pushed-poped to buff

There are cases where len(root_) is 0 but are they present when all other conditions are met to get there?

(Thinking out loud, I have to get my hands dirty and I'll do.)

` No, the point where len(root_) is incremented outside of scan_P_ run that formed it. Basically, you pick initial root_ with len(root_) == 0|1, then add something like: track_id = id(root_), then: if id(root_) == track_id, if len(root_) > 0|1 break # add a breakpoint before break

`

Ah, OK, I thought you're using some special hidden debugger functions which track the objects' lifecycle.
I was thinking of a robust tracking of any object that we want, where and when exactly it was created etc., without such manual checks.

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boris-kz commented Sep 18, 2018

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Twenkid commented Sep 18, 2018

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