My configuration files (dotfiles)
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bin
config
etc
ssh
texmf/tex/latex
vim
zsh
.gitignore
README.md
Xresources
bash_profile
bashrc
ctags
dir_colors
gitconfig
gitignore
gitmessage
install.sh
npmrc
shell_aliases
shell_env
tmux.conf
vimrc
xinitrc
xprofile
zshrc

README.md

dotfiles

My configuration files (dotfiles) for anyone that is interested.

Repository Structure

For the most part the whole repository is meant to be symbolically linked into my home directory. This means that vimrc will be linked to ~/.vimrc and config/ will be linked to ~/.config/, the bin/ directory however gets linked without the leading dot (i.e. ~/bin/). Files that don't follow this scheme are install.sh, README.md, .gitignore, the ssh/ directory and anything under etc/.

In the case of the ssh/ directory, the ssh config file is linked itself as opposed to the whole directory because the directory may contain other sensitive information. I feel it is easier to ensure correct permissions for the ~/.ssh/ directory if done this way, so I think this is a better solution than linking the directory and ignoring everything inside of it.

The files under etc/ are files that help me configure my setup system-wide (such as udev rules) and are unlikely to be used on a system where root access is not permitted. The structure of the etc/ folder is setup to match that of the system, and instead of linking these I copy them to where they need to be in the event that I need them.

Vim Configuration

If you're here for my Vim configuration, make sure you check out the vim/ directory in addition to the vimrc file. There are a bunch of useful bits in those files and some of them are even required for things that are in my vimrc. I can't stop you from just blindly copying my vimrc and using it, but if you do I recommend you at least try to understand what it's doing. I have tried to comment it fairly well so just reading the file should give you a pretty good understanding of it.

Installing

The file install.sh is used to link these files to their correct places. By default the script runs in interactive mode, prompting whether or not to install each group of files. The install script provides a few options for different install cases (all, skipping interactive mode; force, relink already installed files), read the script itself or run install.sh -h for more information.

Usage

Anything on here can be used for free (unless otherwise noted of course), have fun.