low-cost deltabot 3D printer using tensioned lines
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README.md
bearing_608.scad
bearing_holder.scad
config.scad
effector_assembly.scad
effector_base.scad
effector_lower.scad
effector_standoff.scad
effector_tensioner.scad
effector_upper.scad
filament_assembly.scad
filament_hole_test.scad
filament_test.scad
filament_tube.scad
idler.scad
idler_mount.scad
jhead.scad
m5_internal.stl
nema17_mount.scad
skydelta.scad
spool.scad
utl.NEMA.scad

README.md

CAUTION: EXPERIMENTAL!

SkyDelta is a new type of 3D printer that employs tensioned lines for motion, rather than linear axes. This repository includes all the OpenSCAD parts files needed to replicate the design and play with it yourself, under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license (CC BY-NC).

Designed by Brandon Heller in California (mostly, plus some design done over the Pacific). The name refers to Skycam, which flies over football and athletic fields to provide great camera shots, using carefully-controlled high-tension lines.

SkyDelta builds on the triangular prism frame of an extrusion-based Linear Delta of your choice, like a Kossel Mini or Cerberus Pup. It ditches the linear rails, carriages, ball joints, control rods, belts and pulleys. It adds Spectra line, printed parts, bearings, standoffs, and three springs.

On the plus side, it can potentially be cheaper, simpler, and faster to build, plus yield a larger build envelope. On the down side, it may be harder to calibrate, requires new firmware, and may simply not print well.

Honestly, I don't know if it'll work, but it seems fun to try. The parts are carefully designed and all have seen tweaks from printing and assembling them, but the whole assembly will likely need tuning.