Permalink
Fetching contributors…
Cannot retrieve contributors at this time
77 lines (71 sloc) 3.86 KB
<HTML>
<!--
Copyright (c) 2010 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved.
Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); you
may not use this file except in compliance with the License. You
may obtain a copy of the License at
http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or
implied. See the License for the specific language governing
permissions and limitations under the License. See accompanying
LICENSE file.
-->
<HEAD>
<TITLE>YCSB - Core workloads</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<H1><img src="images/ycsb.jpg" width=150> Yahoo! Cloud Serving Benchmark</H1>
<H3>Version 0.1.2</H3>
<HR>
<A HREF="index.html">Home</A> - <A href="coreworkloads.html">Core workloads</A> - <a href="tipsfaq.html">Tips and FAQ</A>
<HR>
<H2>Core workloads</h2>
YCSB includes a set of core workloads that define a basic benchmark for cloud systems. Of course, you can define your own workloads, as described <a href="workload.html">here</A>. However,
the core workloads are a useful first step, and obtaining these benchmark numbers for a variety of different systems would allow you to understand the performance
tradeoffs of different systems.
<P>
The core workloads consist of six different workloads:
<P>
<B>Workload A: Update heavy workload</B>
<P>
This workload has a mix of 50/50 reads and writes. An application example is a session store recording recent actions.
<P>
<B>Workload B: Read mostly workload</B>
<P>
This workload has a 95/5 reads/write mix. Application example: photo tagging; add a tag is an update, but most operations are to read tags.
<P>
<B>Workload C: Read only</B>
<P>
This workload is 100% read. Application example: user profile cache, where profiles are constructed elsewhere (e.g., Hadoop).
<P>
<B>Workload D: Read latest workload</B>
<P>
In this workload, new records are inserted, and the most recently inserted records are the most popular. Application example: user status updates; people want to read the latest.
<P>
<B>Workload E: Short ranges</B>
<P>
In this workload, short ranges of records are queried, instead of individual records. Application example: threaded conversations, where each scan is for the posts in a given thread (assumed to be clustered by thread id).
<P>
<B>Workload F: Read-modify-write</B>
<P>
In this workload, the client will read a record, modify it, and write back the changes. Application example: user database, where user records are read and modified by the user or to record user activity.
<HR>
<H2>Running the workloads</H2>
All six workloads have a data set which is similar. Workloads D and E insert records during the test run. Thus, to keep the database size consistent, we recommend the following sequence:
<OL>
<LI>Load the database, using workload A's parameter file (workloads/workloada) and the "-load" switch to the client.
<LI>Run workload A (using workloads/workloada and "-t") for a variety of throughputs.
<LI>Run workload B (using workloads/workloadb and "-t") for a variety of throughputs.
<LI>Run workload C (using workloads/workloadc and "-t") for a variety of throughputs.
<LI>Run workload F (using workloads/workloadf and "-t") for a variety of throughputs.
<LI>Run workload D (using workloads/workloadd and "-t") for a variety of throughputs. This workload inserts records, increasing the size of the database.
<LI>Delete the data in the database.
<LI>Reload the database, using workload E's parameter file (workloads/workloade) and the "-load switch to the client.
<LI>Run workload E (using workloads/workloadd and "-t") for a variety of throughputs. This workload inserts records, increasing the size of the database.
</OL>
<HR>
YCSB - Yahoo! Research - Contact cooperb@yahoo-inc.com.
</BODY>
</HTML>