Latest commit e84ca1f Feb 2, 2017 @deep-42-thought deep-42-thought committed with enable persistent view of irc messages (#362)
* remove path from libirc-include

* feature: irc: possibly show last n lines persistently instead of all lines said since last time

* irc: add overflow-check, for case when no newmsg's ->next is NULL

README.docs

DA DOCS. YO.
============
The main file that contains the bulk of our documentation is docs.xml .
We use the DocBook format, which is a really kickass xml-based way of
writing documentation, heavily oriented towards programming and computer
stuff. There are tags like <command> and <option> that marks up your
content without actually having to mark it up, which is why something
that's of the <command> shows up in some cool style regardless of
whether it's in a man page or a web page. DocBook has been around for
10 years, and there's TONS of resources online about the different
tags and the stuff that can be done.

FILE ORGANIZATION
=================
For the sake of making things readable and organized,
docs.xml "includes" three other files, as of 8/18/05.
These are config_settings.xml, command_options.xml, and variables.xml .
Their names are pretty self-explanatory, and what the "include" essentially
does is stick their contents into docs.xml at the appropriate locations
when it's time to produce a man page or html file. So if you wanted to
add a variable or explain a command line option better, you'd look in
variables.xml and command_options.xml. If you wanted to change the authors
or something, look in docs.xml

BUILDING DA DOCS
================
(NOTE that the docs are now built automatically via doc/Makefile.am, but it requires that you have docbook2x and xsltproc installed)

making the html is easy. xsltproc should more than likely already be on your system:

xsltproc http://docbook.sourceforge.net/release/xsl/current/html/docbook.xsl docs.xml > docs.html
==============================================================================================================
making the man page is pretty easy, it uses a program called docbook2x, which you might or might not have.

docbook2x-man docs.xml (produces a conky.1 file)
gzip conky.1

conky.1.gz can be viewed in man-form by doing "man -l conky.1.gz"
==============================================================================================================
making the README (text-only) file is just some simple unix:
man -l conky.1.gz | col -b > README