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README.md

Ensurance

Allows you to ensure you have the class you expect... it's similar to

result = value.is_a?(Person) ? value : Person.find(value)

You can add fields to "ensure_by" (self.primary_key is the default) e.g.

if you add ensure_by :token to the User class User.ensure() works User.ensure(:user_id) works User.ensure(:token) works

.ensure() returns nil if the record is not found .ensure!() throws an exception if the record is not found

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'ensurance'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Usage

In your Rails app... include Ensurance either in specific models or ApplicationRecord to cover all your models.

It's really handy for service objects or Jobs that you want to call from the console to try out.

class User < ApplicationRecord
  include Ensurance
end


class SomeServiceClass
  def perform(user)
    user = User.ensure(user)
    # do something constructive here
  end
end

In this way you can call it with a User object, or a user id and it works just the same.

Also adds ensurance features to Hash, Time, and Date

Time.ensure(nil) -> nil
Time.ensure(Date.today) -> Date.today.beginning_of_day
Time.ensure(1509556285) -> 2017-11-01 11:11:25 -0600
Time.ensure("1509556285") -> 2017-11-01 11:11:25 -0600
Time.ensure(DateTime.now) -> DateTime.now.to_time
Time.ensure(1..4) -> ArgumentError "Unhandled Type for Time to ensure: Range"
Time.ensure(Time.now.to_s) -> Time.now [uses Time.parse()]
Time.ensure(Time.now.iso8601) -> Time.now [uses Time.parse()]

Date.ensure(nil) -> nil
Date.ensure(Date.today) -> Date.today
Date.ensure(1509556285) -> 2017-11-01
Date.ensure("1509556285") -> 2017-11-01
Date.ensure("2017-11-01") -> 2017-11-01 [uses Date.parse()]
Date.ensure("11/01/2017") -> 2017-11-01 [uses Date.parse()]

Hash.ensure(nil) -> nil
Hash.ensure(<aHash>) -> <aHash>
Hash.ensure(<json_string>) -> Hash
Hash.ensure(<an array>) -> <an array>.to_h

Array.ensure(nil) -> nil
Array.ensure([]) -> []
Array.ensure("1,2,4") -> ["1","2","4"]
Array.ensure("[1,2,4]") -> [1,2,4]  (JSON string)
Array.ensure({a:1, b:2}) -> [[:a, 1], [:b, 2]]

ActiveRecord

You can specify another field or fields to ensure by doing the following:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  include Ensurance

  ensure_by :token, :id    <- totally optional (:id is the default)
end

User.ensure(nil) -> nil
User.ensure!(nil) -> nil
User.ensure!(1) == User.find(1)
User.ensure(1) == User.find_by_id(1)
User.ensure(<a user record>) -> <a user record> (nothing happens)
User.ensure(<globalid>) == GlobalID::Locator.locate(<globalid>)
User.ensure(<globalid string>) == GlobalID::Locator.locate(<globalid string>)
User.ensure(<some token>) == User.where(token: <some token>).first
User.ensure!(<unknown_id>) -> ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound

Note:

  • They are checked in the order you provide them. (token first, then id)
  • if using something other than a unique field, it returns the most recently created_one (using created_at)

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/bsharpe/ensurance.

License

The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.

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Add ability to "ensure" ActiveRecords are full records

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