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Oct 3, 2020

btcpay-python

Install

pip3 install btcpay-python

If you were a user of the prior unofficial client library for Python, you would need to uninstall it first:

pip3 uninstall btcpay
pip3 install btcpay-python

This library is fully backward compatible with the prior unofficial library; no code changes are needed.

Pairing to your server:

To connect your website with your BTCPay server, you must first pair your application to BTCPay. To do this you will need to generate a pairing code as follows:

  1. On your BTCPay server, browse to Stores > Store settings > Access tokens > Create new token
  2. Fill in the form:
Label: <any string that will help you remember what this pairing is used for>
Public key: leave blank
  1. Click save and then copy the 7 digit pairing code from the success page

After you have the pairing code, you are ready to use the client library to create a client object.

The "easy method" to create a new BTCPay client

Use the pairing code obtained above as follows:

from btcpay import BTCPayClient

client = BTCPayClient.create_client(host='https://btcpay.example.com', code=<pairing-code>)

NOTE THAT PAIRING CODES WORK ONLY ONCE. This is because you only ever need to pair once. See the section later in this document regarding how to save a client object for later after pairing.

Uses for the client object you just created above

You'll probably only ever need the create_invoice and get_invoice methods, but the client object also has other methods, such as those for getting rate information.

Be sure to fully set up your store (including a derivation scheme in your store settings) otherwise these methods will fail.

The get_invoice method is very important. When BTCPay sends a payment notification (described here in Bitpay's API docs), it is unsigned and insecure. Being unsigned and insecure is necessary to maintain compatibility with software originally designed for Bitpay. You therefore cannot rely upon the data transmitted in the payment notification.

Instead, take the invoiceId from the payment notification, and use it to securely fetch the paid invoice data from BTCPay using get_invoice.

Create invoice

See the Bitpay API documentation for a full listing of key-value pairs that can be passed to invoice creation: https://bitpay.com/api#resource-Invoices

new_invoice = client.create_invoice({"price": 20, "currency": "USD"})

Get invoice

fetched_invoice = client.get_invoice(<invoice-id>)

The fetched_invoice above will be a dictionary of all invoice data from the Bitpay API. For instance, you can check the payment status with fetched_invoice['status'].

This get_invoice method is very important. When BTCPay sends a payment notification (described here in Bitpay's API docs), it is unsigned and insecure. Being unsigned and insecure is necessary to maintain compatibility with software originally designed for Bitpay. You therefore cannot rely upon the data transmitted in the payment notification.

Instead, take the invoiceId from the payment notification, and use it to securely fetch the paid invoice data from BTCPay using the get_invoice method above.

Get a list of invoices matching certain parameters

invoice_list = client.get_invoices(status='confirmed')

You can search by status, order_id, date_start, date_end, etc. See the method for a full list of parameters that can be passed to the method. The method returns a list of dictionaries, with each dictionary containing the invoice data for each matching invoice.

Get rates

client.get_rates()

This will fail if you have not set up default currency pairs in your store settings within BTCPay.

Get specific rate

client.get_rate('USD')

Storing the client object for later

After you create a client object, you must save the object to persistent storage if you wish for the pairing to persist beyond the limited time your code is in memory.

You do not need to store any tokens or private keys. Simply pickle the client object and save it to your persistent storage method (Redis, SQLAlchemy/SQLite/PostgreSql, MongoDB, etc). I suggest not using shelve or a similar static file for storage, as concurrent access could corrupt the static file.

When you need to call a method on the client object later, pull the client object from persistent storage, unpickle it, and perform any of the methods above on it which you may need.

Note that the pairing code obtained from BTCPay may only be used once to create one client object. It is then forever burned. You may not recreate a client object by re-using the pairing code. For later use, the client object must either be retrieved from persistent storage (the easy way) or recreated using the pem and merchant token (the hard way).

Creating a client the manual way (not necessary if you used the 'easy' method above)

If you prefer to create the client object manually (as was the only way in the prior unofficial library), you can do so as follows. This is unnecessary for most developers and is preserved primarily to maintain backward compatibility with both the prior unofficial library and Bitpay.

  • Generate and save private key:
import btcpay.crypto
privkey = btcpay.crypto.generate_privkey()
  • Create client:
from btcpay import BTCPayClient
client = BTCPayClient(host='http://hostname', pem=privkey)
  • On BTCPay server > shop > access tokens > create new token, copy pairing code:
  • Pair client to server and save returned token:
client.pair_client(<pairing-code>)
>>> {'merchant': "xdr9vw3v5wc0w90859v45"}
  • Recreate client:
client = BTCPayClient(
    host='http://hostname',
    pem=privkey,
    tokens={'merchant': "xdr9vw3v5wc0w90859v45"}
)