A CLI wrapper around git for an improved developer experience
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
src
.gitignore
CODE_OF_CONDUCT.md
LICENSE
README.md
package.json

README.md

giddy

giddy is a command line tool designed to help you manage your git workflow. It addresses some of the gaps that I've found in git's user experience and provides some helpful aliases for dealing with common git pitfalls. If you've experienced any pitfalls or user experience hiccups with git that you think should be addressed in giddy, please submit an issue.

If you think giddy is totally rad, you should give Safia some money.

Installation

npm install --global giddy

Usage

Stage and Undo

The git add and git rm commands can be a little opaque to new git users. In order to more transparently communicate what they do, giddy stage <file> runs either git rm <file> or git add <file> for a given file depending on whether or not it has been removed from the project.

giddy undo <files> undoes unstaged changes to a file by checking out the version of the file associated with the most recent commit. git undo --all undoes unstaged changes to all files in the project.

Revision History Traversal

Sometimes it's helpful to browse through changes in a project commit by commit. giddy provides a few simple commands for traversing the revision history for a particular project.

giddy back goes backwards one commit in the revision history. For example, in order to go back three commits into the project, a user can input the following commands.

$ giddy back
$ giddy back
$ giddy back

giddy forward goes forward one commit in the revision history until the user has hit the most recent commit for a project. For example, to navigate back two commits and forward one, a use can input the following commands.

$ giddy back
$ giddy back
$ giddy forward

These actions will happen in detached HEAD mode.

giddy latest takes the user to the most recent commit in the revision history regardless of where they are.

giddy-oops

The giddy-oops command is designed to provide shortcuts to handle common git pitfalls like accidently committing a sensitive file to the repository, forgetting to stage a file onto a commit, or undoing the most recent commit.

In order to undo a commit of a sensitive file and remove all references to that file from the revision history, the user can run the following command.

giddy-oops no-git super-secret-file.env

In order to stage a file onto an existing commit, you can run the following command.

giddy-oops missed i-totally-forgot-to-stage-this.txt

Happy gittin'!