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key points of first lesson #116

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psteinb opened this issue Nov 7, 2019 · 2 comments
Open

key points of first lesson #116

psteinb opened this issue Nov 7, 2019 · 2 comments

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@psteinb
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psteinb commented Nov 7, 2019

Check that the key ides are complete and correct for the first lesson with reference to lesson-outline.md.

Use to cdh as a guideline on how to write key points.

@psteinb psteinb added this to the update first lesson milestone Nov 7, 2019
@tkphd
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tkphd commented Feb 8, 2021

From The Carpentries' Curriculum Development Handbook:

5.2.2 Key points

While learning objectives communicate to learners the skills they should develop by working through each episode, key points summarize the main pieces of knowledge that learners should remember after completing the episode. These should also be limited to ~5-7 items. For the episode we’ve been considering in the Data Carpentry lesson Introduction to the Command Line for Genomics, the key points are:

  • “The shell gives you the ability to work more efficiently by using keyboard commands rather than a GUI.”
  • “Useful commands for navigating your file system include: ls, pwd, and cd.”
  • “Most commands take options (flags) which begin with a -.”
  • “Tab completion can reduce errors from mistyping and make work more efficient in the shell.”

The Carpentries lesson template automatically creates a reference page that includes all of the key points for each episode in the lesson. Key points should be specific enough that learners are able to use this reference page as review.

@tkphd
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tkphd commented Feb 8, 2021

The current key points are:

  • High Performance Computing (HPC) typically involves connecting to very large computing systems
    elsewhere in the world.
  • These other systems can be used to do work that would either be impossible or much slower on
    smaller systems.
  • The standard method of interacting with such systems is via a command line interface called
    Bash.

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