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Coinsplit is a tool for generating bitcoin addresses outside of bitcoin
and splitting them into halves and importing them into wallets.

** WARNING: THIS IS A VERY NEW TOOL! DON'T USE IT ON YOUR WALLET!
   BY DEFAULT, THIS TOOL USES THE BITCOIN TESTNET (See -DUSE_TESTNET
   in the Makefile.)

INSTALLATION.

  $ sudo apt-get install libgmp3-dev libssl-dev libdb4.6-dev
  $ make

COINSPLIT COOKBOOK.

Recipe 1:
Generate a bitcoin address on a computer without bitcoin installed.
Perhaps for security purposes.

  $ coinsplit --generate
  (Bitcoin address and private key print to stdout.)
 
  $ coinsplit --generate test.addr
  (This saves to a file.)
 
  (...then later when you want to access the address...)
  $ coinsplit wallet.dat --import test.addr

Recipe 2:
Split a bitcoin address into halves. Perhaps for safe-keeping. Both
parts are needed in order to import the key. This is done as a
one-time pad.

  $ coinsplit --generate --split key.pt1 key.pt2
  (Two files are created, each listing the bitcoin address and
  half of the private key.)

  (...then to import the address...)
  $ coinsplit wallet.dat --import key.pt1 key.pt2

Recipe 3:
Store all keys in ~/.bitcoin/wallet.dat as two separate halves.

  $ coinsplit --wallet --split key.pt1 key.pt2

  (Key files can be joined together, so you can add other wallets
  like...)
  $ coinsplit --wallet --split key.pt1 key.pt2

Recipe 4:
Move an address and its key to another wallet.

  $ coinsplit wallet1.dat --address 13zuMXTyQpCxL2GJZ6pdoVF3RzZiKm7XPu | coinsplit wallet2.dat --import

Recipe 5:
Act as an escrow. Generate a key and split it between the buyer and seller.
(In this case, the "seller" is selling bitcoins for a cost.) You also keep
a copy of the buyer's key, to protect the seller.

  $ coinsplit --generate --split 2>buyer.txt | mail -s "RE: 10 BTC" seller@bitcoin.org

The seller sends 10 BTC to the address in the file. The buyer then verifies
that the coins are present. The buyer pays and the seller gives the buyer the
other half of the key. The buyer then imports the key:

  $ coinsplit --import buyer.txt seller.txt
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