Skip to content
Rails app demonstrating a WebAuthn password-less login
Ruby HTML JavaScript CSS
Branch: master
Clone or download
grzuy Merge pull request #114 from cedarcode/dependabot/bundler/loofah-2.3.1
build(deps): bump loofah from 2.3.0 to 2.3.1
Latest commit 784a9b8 Dec 19, 2019
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
app Allow unpermitted parameter `nickname` Oct 22, 2019
bin refactor: update to webpacker v4 Sep 27, 2019
config feat: don't serve traffic in heroku domain Oct 4, 2019
db
lib
log rails new May 9, 2018
public
test
tmp
vendor rails new May 9, 2018
.browserslistrc refactor: update to webpacker v4 Sep 27, 2019
.env.example docs: add env step in the app setup May 21, 2019
.env.test refactor: remove unnecessary lines Aug 7, 2019
.gitignore
.rubocop.yml build: update rubocop Jul 29, 2019
.ruby-version
.travis.yml ci: cache node modules Aug 14, 2019
Gemfile
Gemfile.lock Merge pull request #114 from cedarcode/dependabot/bundler/loofah-2.3.1 Dec 19, 2019
LICENSE
Procfile build: run db migrations on deploy Oct 6, 2018
README.md docs: update README Oct 4, 2019
Rakefile
babel.config.js
config.ru style: add rubocop Jul 5, 2018
package.json
postcss.config.js
yarn.lock

README.md

WebAuthn Rails Demo App

Application demonstrating a WebAuthn password-less login built with Ruby on Rails + webauthn ruby gem.

Travis

Want to try it?

Option 1 — Visit the hosted version

Option 2 — Run it locally

Prerequisites

  • Ruby
  • yarn (or npm)
  • PostgreSQL

Setup

$ git clone https://github.com/cedarcode/webauthn-rails-demo-app
$ cd webauthn-rails-demo-app/
$ cp .env.example .env
$ bundle install
$ yarn install (or npm install)
$ bundle exec rake db:setup

Running

$ bundle exec rails s

Now you can visit http://localhost:3000 to play with the demo site.

Development

Gem Update Policy

Gemfile Version Constraints

In Gemfile define gem dependencies using a version contrainst of ~> MAJOR.MINOR by default (or ~> 0.MINOR.PATCH if latest MAJOR is 0), unless you have reasons to use something different. An example of an exception could be rails, which is known to make backwards-incompatible changes in minor level updates, so in that case we use ~> MAJOR.MINOR.PATCH.

Updating

$ gem install bundler-audit
$ bundle audit --update
$ bundle update --conservative --group test development
$ bundle update --strict --patch
$ bundle update --strict --minor
$ bundle update --major
$ bundle outdated --groups

More in:

Updating gems cheat sheet

You can’t perform that action at this time.