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A beanstalkd client for node.js & a simple framework for running beanstalkd workers.

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README.md

A straightforward and (nearly) complete beanstalkd client for node.js, along with a more opinionated beanstalkd jobs worker & runner.

FiveBeansClient

Heavily inspired by node-beanstalk-client, which is a perfectly usable client but somewhat dusty. I wanted more complete support of the beanstalkd protocol in a project written in plain javascript.

All client method names are the same case & spelling as the beanstalk text command, with hyphens replaced by underscore.

For complete details on the beanstalkd commands, see its protocol documentation.

Creating a client

var fivebeans = require('fivebeans');
var client = new fivebeans.client('10.0.1.1', 11300);

The constructor takes two arguments:

host: The address of the beanstalkd server. Defaults to 127.0.0.1.
port: Port to connect to. Defaults to 11300.

Producing jobs

use

client.use(tube, function(err, tubename) {});

Use the specified tube. Reponds with the name of the tube being used.

list_tube_used

client.list_tube_used(function(err, tubename) {});

Responds with the name of the tube currently being used by the client.

put

client.put(priority, delay, ttr, payload, function(err, jobid) {});

Submit a job with the specified priority (smaller integers are higher priority), delay in seconds, and allowed time-to-run in seconds. The payload contains the job data the server will return to clients reserving jobs. No processing is done on the data. Responds with the id of the newly-created job.

peek_ready

client.peek_ready(function(err, jobid, payload) {});

Peek at the data for the job at the top of the ready queue of the tube currently in use. Responds with the job id and payload of the next job, or 'NOT_FOUND' if there are no qualifying jobs in the tube.

peek_delayed

client.peek_delayed(function(err, jobid, payload) {});

Peek at the data for the delayed job with the shortest delay in the tube currently in use. Responds with the job id and payload of the next job, or 'NOT_FOUND' if there are no qualifying jobs in the tube.

peek_buried

client.peek_buried(function(err, jobid, payload) {});

Peek at the data for the next buried job in the tube currently in use. Responds with the job id and payload of the next job, or 'NOT_FOUND' if there are no qualifying jobs in the tube.

Consuming jobs

watch

client.watch(tube, function(err, numwatched) {});

Watch the named tube. Responds with the number of tubes currently watched by the client.

ignore

client.ignore(tube, function(err, numwatched) {});

Ignore the named tube. Responds with the number of tubes currently watched by the client.

list_tubes_watched

client.list_tubes_watched(function(err, tubelist) {});

Responds with an array containing the names of the tubes currently watched by the client.

reserve

client.reserve(function(err, jobid, payload) {});

Reserve a job. Responds with the id and the job data. The data is passed through untouched.

reserve_with_timeout

client.reserve_with_timeout(seconds, function(err, jobid, payload) {});

Reserve a job, waiting the specified number of seconds before timing out. err contains the string "TIMED_OUT" if the specified time elapsed before a job became available.

touch

client.touch(jobid, function(err) {});

Inform the server that the client is still processing a job, thus requesting more time to work on it.

destroy

client.destroy(jobid, function(err) {});

Delete the specified job. Responds with null if successful, a string error otherwise. This is the only method not named identically to its beanstalkd counterpart, because delete is a reserved word in Javascript.

release

client.release(jobid, priority, delay, function(err) {});

Release the specified job and assign it the given priority and delay (in seconds). Responds with null if successful, a string error otherwise.

bury

client.bury(jobid, priority, function(err) {});

Bury the specified job and assign it the given priority. Responds with null if successful, a string error otherwise.

kick

client.kick(maxToKick, function(err, numkicked) {});

Kick at most maxToKick delayed and buried jobs back into the active queue. Responds with the number of jobs kicked.

Server statistics

peek

client.peek(id, function(err, jobid, payload) {});

Peek at the data for the specified job.

pause_tube

client.pause_tube(tubename, delay, function(err) {});

Pause the named tube for the given number of seconds. No new jobs may be reserved from the tube while it is paused.

list_tubes

client.list_tubes(function(err, tubenames) {});

List all the existing tubes. Responds with an array of tube names.

stats_job

client.stats_job(jobid, function(err, response) {});

Request statistics for the specified job. Responds with a hash containing information about the job. See the beanstalkd documentation for a complete list of stats.

stats_tube

client.stats_tube(tubename, function(err, response) {});

Request statistics for the specified tube. Responds with a hash containing information about the tube. See the beanstalkd documentation for a complete list of stats.

stats

client.stats(function(err, response) {});

Request statistics for the beanstalkd server. Responds with a hash containing information about the server. See the beanstalkd documentation for a complete list of stats.

FiveBeansWorker

Inspired by node-beanstalk-worker but updated & rewritten to work with jobs queued by Stalker.

The worker pulls jobs off the queue & passes them to matching handlers. It deletes successful jobs & requeues unsuccessful ones. It logs its actions to the console and to a file.

Each job must be a JSON list containing two items:

[ tubename, jobdata ]

This is for compatibility with the Stalker library, which wraps the job data this way.

The job data is a hash with two fields:

type: type string matching a handler
payload: job data, in whatever format the job defines

The worker looks up a handler using the given type string and calls work() on the job payload.

Handler modules must export a field called 'type' with a brief descriptive string. They must also export a method called work() with this signature:

work(jobdata, callback(action, delay))

jobdata: job payload
action: 'success' | 'release' | 'bury' | custom error message
delay: time to delay if the job is released; otherwise unused

If the action is "success", the job is deleted. If it is "release", the job is released with the specified delay. If it is "bury", the job is buried. All other actions are treated as errors & the job is buried in response.

Handlers are extended with winston logging functions before they're used. This gives you access to each worker's logger inside your handlers. From within work(), call logging methods on this.

API

new FiveBeansWorker(options)

Returns a new worker object. options is a hash containing the following keys:

id: how this worker should identify itself in logs
host: beanstalkd host
port: beanstalkd port
logdir: directory for log files
handlers: list of handler objects; see above

start(tubelist, ignoreDefault)

Connects the worker to the beanstalkd server & sets it watching the specified tubes. The second option controls whether to ignore the default tube.

Example

var beanworker = require('fivebeans').worker;
var options = {
    id: 'worker_4', 
    host: '127.0.0.1',
    port: 11300,
    logdir: "./logs",
    handlers: handlerList,
}
var worker = new beanworker(options);
worker.start(['high', 'medium', 'low'], true);
return worker;

FiveBeansRunner

A wrapper that runs a single beanstalkd worker as a daemon. Responds to the USR2 signal by reloading the configuration and restarting the worker. Handles SIGINT, SIGHUP, and SIGQUIT by completing processing on the current job then stopping.

Example use:

var fivebeans = require('fivebeans');
var runner = new fivebeans.runner('worker_id_1', '/path/to/config.yml');
runner.go();

bin/beanworker

The above code plus optimist wrapped in a node shell script for your convenience.

bin/beanworker --id=[ID] --config=[config.yml]

Creates a runner for a worker with the specified ID & configured with the specified yaml file.

Configuration file

Here's an example yaml configuration:

beanstalkd:
    host: "127.0.0.1"
    port: 11300
watch:
    - 'circle'
    - 'picadilly'
    - 'northern'
    - 'central'
handlers:
    - "./handlers/holborn.js"
    - "./handlers/greenpark.js"
    - "./handlers/knightsbridge.js"
logdir: "/path/to/log"
ignoreDefault: true

beanstalkd: where to connect
watch: a list of tubes to watch.
handlers: a list of handler files to require
logdir: path to the directory for worker logs
ignoreDefault: true if this worker should ignore the default tube

You may omit the logdir line to suppress logging to a file.

If the handler paths don't start with / the current working directory will be prepended to them before they are required.

TODO

  • Handle DEADLINE_SOON from the server.

  • Hacky manner of exposing logging to the job handlers is hacky. Also too tied to the specific logging engine. Replace.

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