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use \lstinline throughout

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1 parent 7b22cd6 commit bd7127a47096a2849ca2937f8111c527c13f6e5d @charlietanksley committed Apr 4, 2011
Showing with 12 additions and 12 deletions.
  1. +12 −12 git-latex.tex
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@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
\date{\today}
\begin{document}
-\lstset{language=[LaTeX]TeX,breaklines=true,frame=single,frameround=tttt}
+ \lstset{language=bash,breaklines=true,frame=single,frameround=tttt,basicstyle=\ttfamily}
\maketitle
\tableofcontents
@@ -46,18 +46,18 @@ \section{What is a VCS?}
\section{Basic mechanics}
You are writing a paper, and you are doing so in \LaTeX with your
-favorite editor. Suppose the paper is \verb!paper.tex!, and suppose
+favorite editor. Suppose the paper is \lstinline!paper.tex!, and suppose
you are at the point where you are revising the paper—you have a draft
and you need to rework numerous sections. If you are using a VCS
-(which you have already told to watch \verb!paper.tex!) your basic
+(which you have already told to watch \lstinline!paper.tex!) your basic
workflow will look something like this:
\begin{enumerate}
\item
Write some. Maybe you delete half of a section and rewrite it.
\item
\emph{Commit} your changes. That is, you have already told your VCS
- to keep its eyes on \verb!paper.tex!, now you are telling the VCS
+ to keep its eyes on \lstinline!paper.tex!, now you are telling the VCS
about the changes you've made. Your VCS will know exactly what words
you changed, what you added, and what you deleted; when you commit
your changes you are telling the VCS to (a) save the hunk of changes
@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ \section{Slightly more advanced mechanics}
command to revert your paper to that old version.
(I realize you could do something like this without a VCS—you could
-save a copy of the paper \verb!good_version_from_december_7.tex! or
+save a copy of the paper \lstinline!good_version_from_december_7.tex! or
whatever. I'll talk more about this below.)
Or suppose that you realize that while the new version isn't better
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ \section{Slightly more advanced mechanics}
\section{But why use a VCS?}
People who don't use a VCS likely have one of two approaches to paper
-versions. One is the \verb!paper_1.tex!, \verb!paper_2.tex!, etc.
+versions. One is the \lstinline!paper_1.tex!, \lstinline!paper_2.tex!, etc.
approach. With this approach, you create a new draft at every
significant milestone or when you want to try something new. The other
approach is to have one version of the paper and just plow ahead; you
@@ -157,24 +157,24 @@ \section{A VCS is elegant}
So they were more or less pointless.
A VCS keeps one copy of your file. It has its own mechanism for
-keeping track of older versions. So you have one \verb!paper.tex!
+keeping track of older versions. So you have one \lstinline!paper.tex!
file. If you decide you want to go back to a version from two months
-ago, you issue a command and the contents of \verb!paper.tex! change
+ago, you issue a command and the contents of \lstinline!paper.tex! change
to that old version. The new one is still there—a simple command
-brings you back. So \verb!paper.tex! is now slightly magical: it can
+brings you back. So \lstinline!paper.tex! is now slightly magical: it can
turn into any document in its history at your command.
When you make a commit (tell the VCS about some changes), you write a
commit message. You could make these as uninformative as you like (my
first few months of messages were pretty weak). So if you change the
definition of 'four-dimensionalism' throughout you could have a commit
-message that reads \verb!made some changes! or \verb!changed the
+message that reads \lstinline!made some changes! or \lstinline!changed the
definition of four-dimensionalism throughout!. If you go with the
latter, then when you look at your history you can see exactly what
you did.
Most VCSs will let you tag a version of a file. So you could say that
-the version of \verb!paper.tex! from 8am on November 2010 is v1.0.
+the version of \lstinline!paper.tex! from 8am on November 2010 is v1.0.
When you do that, you should have the option to write a detailed
message about this version. So you could say what you liked about this
version but what you are thinking about changing. Then when you look
@@ -246,7 +246,7 @@ \section{History}
I use my VCS, git, for this all the time. I'm fond of a program called
\href{http://jonas.nitro.dk/tig/}{Tig} that lets me view a graphical
representation of my git repository in a terminal (there are other GUI
-alternatives). So I run \verb!tig --all! in a terminal and can very
+alternatives). So I run \lstinline!tig --all! in a terminal and can very
quickly see where I've been working recently. This is something like
a high-tech version of reading the last paragraph you wrote yesterday
before you start writing today. Only this version is quite helpful

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