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PSYCH 207: fixed a couple of typos.

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christhomson committed Mar 14, 2013
1 parent f489d77 commit fa1e253a38f488dfec9c4c6ceb50cee113e4e5f2
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  1. BIN psych207.pdf
  2. +2 −2 psych207.tex
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@@ -961,7 +961,7 @@
\item Research shows that you actually mentally rotate in your mind (no shortcuts).
\item There are individual differences in how good people are at generating images.
\item Spatial and visual processing are quite similar. Mathematical ability is highly associated with mental rotation ability (since spatial processing is really just comparing magnitudes).
- \item \textbf{Symbolic difference effect}: if you create an image of two things, the difference between the two jobs determines the performance of the comparison. For example, comparing an elephant and a cat is quicker than comparing a beaver to a cat or a mouse to a rat. Comparing 7 to 2 is faster than comparing 3 to 2.
+ \item \textbf{Symbolic difference effect}: if you create an image of two things, the difference between the two determines the performance of the comparison. For example, comparing an elephant and a cat is quicker than comparing a beaver to a cat or a mouse to a rat. Comparing 7 to 2 is faster than comparing 3 to 2.
\item Shepard and Metzler (1971) conducted an experiment where they asked participants to compare two objects and decide if they are the same. The objects were presented at different orientations/rotations. They discovered the time to compare is directly related to the degree of rotation required. In their experiment, there was a rotation rate of 60 degrees per second.
\item Men perform better than woman (by one standard deviation) for mental rotations on average, and the converse is true for information processing. Females typically have more math anxiety on average, so this is fairly logical.
\item Performance is likely better for rotating letters exactly 180 degrees (upside down).
@@ -1053,7 +1053,7 @@
\item We perceive speech by breaking its continuity up into chunks (words).
\item Like visual perception, context aids our interpretation of sounds and words, and can create illusions in some cases.
\item \textbf{Acoustic context effect}: perception of speech is context-sensitive. Neighboring stimuli can change how sound is perceived.
- \item \textbf{Visual context effect}: watching a guy's lips say ``ga'' when his voice is actually saying ``ba'' will make you hear any number of things, even things like ``ga.''
+ \item \textbf{Visual context effect}: watching a guy's lips say ``ga'' when his voice is actually saying ``ba'' will make you hear any number of things, even things like ``da.''
\end{itemize}
\subsection{Language \& Cognition}

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