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Applied patches from Jim Keenan.

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commit c405bcc5cc269eab3294ba358ef85e2325600b72 1 parent 6308a25
@chromatic authored
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3  CREDITS
@@ -83,3 +83,6 @@ E: Jenda@Krynicky.cz
N: Curtis Jewell
E: csjewell@cpan.org
+
+N: James E Keenan
+E: jkeenan@cpan.org
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10 sections/barewords.pod
@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
Z<barewords>
-Perl uses sigils other punctuation pervasively; they help both the parser and
+Perl uses sigils and other punctuation pervasively to help both the parser and
the programmer identify the categories of named entities. Even so, Perl is a
malleable language. You can write programs in the most creative, maintainable,
-obfuscated, or bizarre fashion you prefer. Maintainability is a concern of
+obfuscated, or bizarre fashion as you prefer. Maintainability is a concern of
good programs, but the developers of Perl itself don't presume to dictate what
-I<you> most maintainable.
+I<you> find most maintainable.
X<bareword>
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ Hash keys in Perl 5 are barewords. These are usually not ambiguous because
their use as keys is sufficient for the parser to identify them as the
equivalent of single-quoted strings. Yet be aware that attempting to evaluate
a function call or a built-in operator (such as C<shift>) to I<produce> a hash
-key may not do as you expect, unless you disambiguate.
+key may not do what you expect, unless you disambiguate.
=begin programlisting
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ X<packages; bareword names>
Package names in Perl 5 are barewords in a sense. Good naming conventions for
packages (initial caps) help prevent unwanted surprises, but the parser uses a
heuristic to determine whether C<< Package->method() >> means to call a
-function named C<Package()> and the call the C<method()> method on its results
+function named C<Package()> and then call the C<method()> method on its results
or whether to treat C<Package> as the name of a package. You can disambiguate
this with the postfix package separator (C<::>), but that's rare and admittedly
ugly:
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6 sections/perl_community.pod
@@ -72,12 +72,6 @@ well as Perl 5 and Perl 6 development. Every CPAN distribution has its own RT
queue, linked from C<search.cpan.org> and available on U<http://rt.cpan.org/>.
Perl 5 and Perl 6 have separate RT queues available on U<http://rt.perl.org/>.
-X<corehackers>
-
-The corehackers project helps identify useful changes to Perl 5 and helps to
-mentor new developers into fixing bugs and adding features. Its wiki is
-available at U<http://corehackers.perl.org/>.
-
X<Perl 5 Porters>
X<p5p>
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9 sections/prototypes.pod
@@ -4,10 +4,11 @@ Z<prototypes>
X<prototypes>
-Novices commonly assume that they serve as function signatures. They do not;
-instead they serve two separate purposes. They offer hints to the parser to
-change the way it parses functions and their arguments. They also modify the
-way Perl 5 handles arguments to those functions when it executes them.
+A I<prototype> is a piece of optional metadata attached to a function
+declaration. Novices commonly assume that these <prototypes serve as function
+signatures. They do not; instead they serve two separate purposes. They offer
+hints to the parser to change the way it parses functions and their arguments.
+They also modify the way Perl 5 handles arguments to those functions.
To declare a function prototype, add it after the name:
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